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Publications archive - Annual reports

Disclaimer

Key departmental publications, e.g. annual reports, budget papers and program guidelines are available in our online archive.

Much of the material listed on these archived web pages has been superseded, or served a particular purpose at a particular time. It may contain references to activities or policies that have no current application. Many archived documents may link to web pages that have moved or no longer exist, or may refer to other documents that are no longer available.

Environment Australia Annual Report 2000-01

Environment Australia, 2001
ISSN 1441-9335

Management of human resources

Workforce planning, staffing retention and turnover

During the year Environment Australia made considerable progress in improving workforce planning strategies to better align resources to the achievement of the business objectives of the organisation. This involves continuous monitoring of workforce data, including demographics, profiles, staff retention and turnover, to identify trends and develop appropriate strategies in the areas of recruitment, remuneration and conditions, and staff development. Workforce analysis contributed significantly to the development of strategies for the second Environment Australia certified agreement.

Future activities will focus on identifying current and desired skills through the development of a capabilities framework.

In taking a strategic approach to workforce planning, Environment Australia is in the process of developing an annual people development plan to identify learning and development priorities. The plan will identify the generic skills, development objectives, principles, responsibilities and performance measurements necessary to achieve the business outcomes and commitments outlined in the corporate plan, certified agreement and strategic people management plan. Development of the strategic people management plan has been an initiative during the year.

Through the Environment Australia Certified Agreement 2000-2002, Environment Australia has recognised the importance of maintaining a competitive remuneration and flexible conditions package. This has contributed to the retention of staff during the year with reduced turnover, particularly at Environment Australia level 6 and executive level 1, the levels with the highest numbers of staff required for policy work.

Bureau of Meteorology

The major changes that have taken place in the Government's approach to the management of the Australian Public Service over recent years have impacted significantly on the Bureau of Meteorology and created formidable human resource management challenges for the Bureau. In the face of reducing staff numbers, an aging staff profile resulting from low levels of recruitment over the past 15 or so years, the shortage of staff in key employment categories and the relative absence of lower level staff in most categories, the Bureau will continue to emphasise workforce planning to ensure the best staffing situation possible. In particular, and to ensure that the Bureau's primary service operations are maintained, the size of the annual recruitment intakes of key specialist groups (meteorologists and observers) have been increased to the extent possible in recent years, whilst allowing limited recruitment of staff in other categories. Further efforts in the workforce planning area have given priority to base-grade recruitment into specialist and core function categories, restructuring within the resource envelope to increase the proportion of staff at operational levels, increased exposure of more junior staff to senior management tasks and staff training and development generally.

Australian Antarctic Division

The Australian Antarctic Division has had a very low rate of staff turnover. The average age of AAD employees is approximately 45 years and many employees have more than 20 years service. In this context the AAD commenced development of a programme to re-focus its workforce management and planning framework, to ensure that the basic culture of the AAD is one in which the principles of workforce planning are more actively considered in the context of achieving business outcomes.

Generally, the Australian Antarctic Division is able to attract suitably qualified applicants for most vacancies, although there has been some difficulty in recruiting women in science and management disciplines. This trend has been arrested to some degree with an increase in female representation in the research science field and the engagement of two female station leaders for the Australian National Antarctic Research Expeditions' 2002 season.

Training and development

Environment Australia continued its commitment to achieving the Investors in People standard, the internationally recognised quality standard for improving the organisation's performance. Efforts to ready the organisation for recognition as an Investor in People produced further improvements to Environment Australia's approach to training and development. A network of coordinators and an advisory team chaired by a deputy secretary were appointed, a communications strategy was developed and implemented and senior managers worked to identify and implement changes in their approach to developing people.

Environment Australia's major investment in training and development was the implementation of the new performance and development scheme for all non-senior executive service staff. The scheme features team planning, individual performance agreements and development plans, 360 degree feedback and performance assessment. To implement the scheme all work teams participated in facilitated planning workshops designed to produce annual business plans and allow individuals to draft their performance agreements and development plans. By 30 June 2001 most staff had undertaken the 360 degree feedback process and received their reports. In preparation for performance assessment, workshops were conducted for managers and staff on the assessment process and on giving and receiving feedback.

The Graduate Development Programme continued with 20 new graduates commencing at the end of January 2001. These graduates were the first to be recruited through a new process featuring online applications, preliminary testing and assessment centres. It was also the first time Environment Australia had conducted its own separate advertising campaign for graduate recruits. A total of 1500 graduates from all over Australia applied for the positions.
Implementation of the Indigenous Recruitment and Career Development Strategy made significant progress during the year. A traditional skills template has been developed for staff at the Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park and is awaiting board of management approval. At Kakadu National Park, traditional skills were incorporated into the selection criteria of a number of staff positions. Training in job selection processes and techniques was provided to staff and traditional owners of the three jointly managed parks. A number of cross-cultural and workplace diversity awareness programmes were conducted across the Department.

The strategy provides for 10 indigenous traineeships. Seven people had been recruited for the Canberra office and the national parks by 30 June 2001. Progress was made towards finalising the learning guides for the Northern Territory Education and Training Authority training package in lands, parks and wildlife. This package will be used as the basis for the accredited training of indigenous trainees in the parks.

Other programmes provided during the year included:

Bureau of Meteorology

The Bureau of Meteorology's training programme aims to meet the Bureau's needs for staff with appropriate management skills and specialised technical and professional skills. It also provides specialised meteorological training to defence force personnel and to the staff of overseas national meteorological and hydrological services.

In 2000 and 2001, large initial training courses were conducted at the levels of professional officer (meteorologist) and technical officer (observer) to compensate for the increased retirement rate within the Bureau.

Over 1070 staff undertook short, in-service training courses covering such aspects of management development as project or change management, accrual accounting, the Bureau's new SAP financial management system and the Australian Public Service Values and Code of Conduct. Twenty-one staff were enrolled in the Bureau's management education programme, conducted in conjunction with the Association of Professional Engineers, Scientists and Managers Australia, which provides formal qualifications at the certificate and graduate certificate levels.

Further details on the Bureau of Meteorology's training activities for 2000-01 are in the Bureau's annual report.

Australian Antarctic Division

The Australian Antarctic Division continued to invest in management and leadership development at the non-senior executive service level. Nominated employees, usually at Australian Public Service level 6 and above, participated in a management and leadership development programme with the Mt Eliza Business School. The programme promotes appropriate values and generates an enhanced awareness of leadership style, expectations, challenges and personal abilities.

Participants, from all areas of the Australian Antarctic Division, have consistently provided positive feedback in regard to this programme. The result is a core group of employees who share a commitment to contemporary management and leadership principles.

Current developments in workforce planning and workforce management will give greater emphasis to strategic learning and development programmes and examine the potential for succession planning. The Australian Antarctic Division Certified Agreement 2000-2002 commits to the development of a performance appraisal scheme that reinforces a performance and learning culture and requires that the scheme be linked to appropriate learning and development outcomes.

Impact and features of certified agreements and Australian Workplace Agreements, and productivity initiatives

Certified agreements

Environment Australia, the Bureau of Meteorology and the Australian Antarctic Division are covered by separate certified agreements. Australian Workplace Agreements for executive level 1 and 2 employees are also handled separately. Australian Workplace Agreements are offered to all senior executive service staff.

The Environment Australia Certified Agreement 2000-2002 was certified on 2 August 2000 under section 170LJ of the Workplace Relations Act 1996. The agreement received a favourable response from staff, with 93.9 per cent of those who voted supporting the agreement. The agreement has a nominal expiry date of 30 June 2002 and builds on the gains and achievements made under the 1998-1999 certified agreement. It makes an important contribution to increasing Environment Australia's efficiency and effectiveness, improving the agency's policy and programme outcomes, and enhancing the quality of the working lives of employees. The overall remuneration and conditions package represents an excellent outcome for Environment Australia and its employees. The main features of this comprehensive agreement which contribute to productivity improvements in Environment Australia include:

In accordance with commitments in the certified agreement, management and employees have been working cooperatively through the market testing of corporate services, monitoring the feasibility of streamlining work processes and practices, and assessing possible savings and improvements, including the use of SAP employee self-service.

Bureau of Meteorology

Action in 2000-01 focused on the implementation of productivity and efficiency initiatives identified in the Bureau of Meteorology's Certified Agreement 2000-01 which was ratified by the Australian Industrial Relations Commission in April 2000. The main issues addressed were:

Australian Antarctic Division

The AAD's second certified agreement was certified under section 170 LJ of the Workplace Relations Act on 28 August 2000, with 92 per cent of employee votes cast being in favour. This agreement consolidates and builds on significant streamlining of conditions and administration that occurred with the last agreement.

The Australian Antarctic Division Certified Agreement 2000-2002 emphasises the development and implementation of a new performance appraisal scheme for all AAD employees, reinforcing a performance and learning culture within the AAD and focusing performance on appropriate values and business outcomes. The agreement also commits all parties to working constructively through productivity initiatives, the output pricing review and market testing processes.
Late in 2000-01, the AAD embarked on a programme of organisational review, focusing on the achievement of identified business outcomes, compliance with Australian Public Service and AAD values, and productivity improvement. This process will continue into 2001-02.

The AAD's human resources management functions (as with corporate services functions overall) produced competitive results in the context of the output pricing review. Market testing of corporate services within the AAD is in the scoping stage.

Australian Workplace Agreements

During 2000-01, Environment Australia offered all ongoing executive level 1 and 2 employees an Australian Workplace Agreement, recognising that executive level employees have a key role to play in the leadership and management of Environment Australia. The key feature of these agreements is a performance bonus system.

Development of contracts and subsequent negotiations of Australian Workplace Agreements for a select group of key Bureau of Meteorology executive level 2 managers were completed. These second-round workplace agreements build on the principles established earlier and go towards matching individuals' reward in meeting their assessed contribution to achieving corporate objectives.

Arrangements for the extension of Australian Workplace Agreements to Australian Antarctic Division employees at executive levels 1 and 2 are under development.

In line with Government policy, the agreements are offered to all Environment Australia, Bureau of Meteorology and Australian Antarctic Division senior executive service staff.

Employment conditions and remuneration

Environment Australia

As at 30 June 2001, there were 49 approved Australian Workplace Agreements in place for senior executive service and equivalent employees.
The salary range available for senior executive service employees is $87 815 per annum to $145 183.

Australian Workplace Agreements provide non-salary benefits including various leave types; use of an executive vehicle; home computing facilities; airline club membership; removal of deeming for recreation leave; and eligibility for spouse-accompanied overseas travel.

There were 1259 Environment Australia employees covered by the certified agreement and 185 executive level employees covered by Australian Workplace Agreements.

Non-salary benefits provided by Environment Australia include:

Environment Australia employee salaries as at 30 June 2001

Environment Australia classification Salary range
1/2
$26 407 - $34 190
3
$34 924 - $39 683
4
$39 145 - $42 242
5
$42 840 - $45 920
6
$46 725 - $55 125
Executive level 1
$58 598 - $78 909
Executive level 2
$67 575 - $94 430

Note: Includes research scientists and public affairs officers. A small number of employees at executive levels 1 and 2 receive an
additional skills and responsibilities salary supplement of up to 10 per cent of salary as part of their Australian Workplace Agreement.

Bureau of Meteorology

There are 1447 Bureau of Meteorology employees covered by the Bureau's certified agreement and seven non-senior executive service employees covered by Australian Workplace Agreements.

Non-salary benefits provided by the Bureau (excluding Australian Workplace Agreement provisions) include:

Bureau of Meteorology employee salaries as at 30 June 2001

Australian Public Service classification Salary range
Cadet (full-time study)
$15 317 - $16 929
Cadet (work placement)
$27 071 - $29 920
Trainee
$29 232 - $32 403
1
$24 993 - $29 920 ($30 048 RP)
2
$30 638 - $33 976 ($34 795 RP)
3
$34 408 - $39 607 ($40 266 RP)
4
$37 664 - $42 230 ($43 064 RP)
5
$40 401 - $46 000 ($46 826 RP)
6
$46 855 - $53 822
Executive level 1
$60 065 - $73 085
Executive level 2
$69 277 - $108 315
Chief research scientist
$109 803 - $109 803

Note: RP means retention point.

Australian Antarctic Division

There are 292 Australian Antarctic Division employees covered by the AAD's certified agreement.

Non-salary benefits provided by the AAD include:

Australian Antarctic Division employee salaries as at 30 June 2001

Australia Antarctic Division classification Salary range
Band 1
$27 126 - $29 642
Band 2
$30 531 - $34 361
Band 3
$35 392 - $37 547
Band 4
$38 674 - $42 260
Band 5
$43 528 - $46 178
Band 6
$47 563 - $53 532
Band 7
$55 139 - $63 922
Band 8
$65 839 - $108 826
Medical practitioner 2
$85 907 - $99 591
Expeditioner band 1
$37 408 - $50 090
Expeditioner band 2
$46 040 - $62 134
Expeditioner band 3
$63 945 - $73 324
Medical practitioner 1
$90 376 - $101 246

Performance pay - Executive Levels 1 and 2, 2000-01

  Executive level 1 Executive level 2
Environment Australia
 
Number of staff
83
78
Average performance pay
$2190
$2790
Range of performance pay
$407 - $3906
$466 - $8000
Total
$181 770
$217 628
Bureau of Meteorology
 
Number of staff
0
7
Average performance pay
0
$9250
Range of performance pay
0
$4260 - $11 475
Total
0
$64 752

Note: There were no performance payments for executive level staff in the Australian Antarctic Division.

Remuneration for senior executive service employees

Environment Australia's remuneration strategy for its employees in the senior executive service is based on the following set of principles:

Almost all Environment Australia's senior executive service employees have Australian Workplace Agreements. The Secretary reviews the senior executive service remuneration package from time to time. The next round of agreements is proposed to be effective from July 2001 with a nominal expiry date of June 2003.

Occupational health and safety

Environment Australia's occupational health and safety performance is outlined at Appendix 3.

Staffing tables

Performance pay - Senior executive service 2000-01

  Senior executive level 1 Senior executive levels 2/3
Number of staff
33
15
Average performance pay
$6817
$12 783
Range of performance pay
$708 - $15 743
$4241 - $24 197
Total
$226 565
$191 749

Notes:
The table comprises aggregated Environment Australia, Bureau of Meteorology and Australian Antarctic Division numbers.
Some payments were made on a pro-rata basis as senior executive or executive level employment did not span the full appraisal year.
Performance payments paid during 2000-01 related to performance during the 1999-2000 appraisal cycle.

The total senior executive service and non-senior executive service performance pay was:

Environment Australia
$696 913
Bureau of Meteorology
$148 427
Australian Antarctic Division
$37 124
Total
$882 464

Environment Australia - Staff employed under the Public Service Act as at 30 June 2001

  Full-time Part-time  
 
Ongoing
Non-ongoing
Ongoing
Non-ongoing
 
Male
Female
Male
Female
Male
Female
Male
Female
Total
Department
380
394
47
56
14
63
12
21
987
Parks Australia
144
72
29
24
4
13
54
61
401
Australian Heritage Commission
27
41
5
5
3
7
0
3
91
Grand total
551
507
81
885
21
83
66
85
1479

Environment Australia - Staff by classification, gender and location as at 30 June 2001

  Secretary Senior executive Executive Environment Australia
1/2 - 6*
Research scientist Public affairs Total
Australian Capital Territory              
Females
11
154
437
13
615
Males
1
32
218
253
2
5
511
Total
1
43
372
690
2
18
1126
New South Wales
Females
2
28
30
Males
1
8
55
64
Total
0
1
10
83
0
0
94
Western Australia
Females
2
2
Males
1
9
10
Total
0
0
1
11
0
0
12
Northern Territory
Females
3
109
112
Males
3
16
111
5
135
Total
0
3
19
220
5
0
247
Grand total
1
47
402
1004
7
18
1479

* Includes 118 casual employees and day labourers

Environment Australia - Senior executive service as at 30 June 2001

  Male Female Total
Band 1
24
10
34
Band 2
8
1
9
Band 3
3
1
4

Includes 7 inoperative staff
Includes 6 Environment Australia executive level 2 staff acting senior executive band 1

Environment Australia - Senior executive service mobility as at 30 June 2001

Commencements 0
Cessations 3
Transfers/promotions within Department 5

Bureau of Meteorology - Staff by classification, gender and location as at 30 June 2001

  Chief of Division Senior executive Administrative Professional Technical General service Information technology Public affairs Research scientist Trainee Total
New South Wales                      
Females
3
7
4
      14
Males
1
6
44
66
1
      118
Total
1
9
51
70
1
      132
Victoria
       
Females
2
82
53
12
17
    4 170
Males
1
7
101
225
146
3
103
1 15 20 622
Total
1
9
183
278
158
3
120
1 15 24 792
Queensland
       
Females
5
7
2
      14
Males
1
7
38
93
1
1
      141
Total
1
12
45
95
1
1
      155
South Australia
Females
5
1
2
8
 
6
22
54
1
1
84
Total
11
23
56
1
1
92
Western Australia
Females
3
2
5
10
Males
1
5
24
86
1
117
Total
1
8
26
91
1
127
Tasmania
Females
5
2
5
12
Males
2
22
45
1
70
Total
7
24
50
1
82
Northern Territory
Females
3
7
3
13
Males
1
24
46
1
72
Total
4
31
49
1
85
Grand total
1
12
234
478
569
5
126
1
15
24
1465

Bureau of Meteorology - Staff employed under the Public Service Act as at 30 June 2001

  Full-time Part-time
 
Ongoing
Non-ongoing
Ongoing
Non-ongoing
Male
1159
48
6
11
Female
173
23
38
7
Total
1332
71
44
18

Bureau of Meteorology - Senior executives as at 30 June 2001

  Male Female Total
Band 1
6
2
8
Band 2
3*
0
3*
Band 3
1
0
1
Total
10
2
12

* Includes one Chief of Division Grade 2

Bureau of Meteorology - Senior executive service mobility as at 30 June 2001

Transfers/promotions within Department 1
Promotions within the Department 4

Bureau of Meteorology - Inoperative staff as at 30 June 2001

  Senior executive Non-senior executive
Leave without pay
0
14
Maternity leave
0
2
Special training schemes
0
3
Compensation
0
2
Long-service leave
0
5
Sick leave
0
3
Mixed leave
0
10
Total
0
39

Australian Antarctic Division - Staff employed under the Public Service Act as at 30 June 2001

  Full-time Part-time  
 
Ongoing
Non-ongoing
Ongoing
Non-ongoing
Total
 
Male
Female
Male
Female
Male
Female
Male
Female
Tasmania
Chief of Division
1
1
Senior executive 1
1
1
2
Senior executive 2
1
1
Band 1
1
5
3
1
10
Band 2
7
2
2
1
12
Band 3
3
6
5
7
3
24
Band 4
5
6
1
3
2
17
Band 5
18
12
9
1
1
2
1
44
Band 6
36
4
15
7
2
1
2
67
Band 7
10
4
8
1
23
Band 8
35
1
36
Medical practitioner 1
1
1
Medical practitioner 2
2
1
3
Total
118
41
44
21
4
7
4
2
241
Antarctica
Medical practitioner 1
2
2
4
Expeditioner band 1
27
27
Expeditioner band 2
1
19
20
Expeditioner band 3
3
1
4
Total
1
0
51
3
0
0
0
0
55
Grand total
119
41
95
24
4
7
4
2
296

Australian Antarctic Division - Employment arrangements as at 30 June 2001

  Senior executive Non-senior executive
Australian Workplace Agreement
3
0
Certified agreement coverage
292
Award
1
0

Australian Antarctic Division - Staff by classification, gender and location as at 30 June 2001

  Chief of Division Senior executive Band 1 - 8 Medical practitioner Expeditioner
band 1 - 3
Tasmania          
Females
0
1
70
0
0
Males
1
2
163
4
0
Total
1
3
233
4
0
Antarctica
Females
0
0
0
2
1
Males
0
0
0
2
50
Total
0
0
0
4
51
Grand total
1
3
233
8
51

Australian Antarctic division - Senior executive Service as At 30 June 2000

  Male Female Total
Band 1
1
1
2
Band 2
1
0
1
Band 3
0
0
0
Total
2
1
3