Wildlife Conservation Plan for Migratory Shorebirds

Department of the Environment and Heritage, 2006

Wildlife conservation plan open for public comment

About the plan

At a national level Commonwealth legislation, the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Act 1999 (EPBC Act) provides for the development and implementation of Wildlife Conservation Plans. The Australian Government Department of the Environment and Heritage, in consultation with interested stakeholders, has developed a Wildlife Conservation Plan for Migratory Shorebirds.

A wildlife conservation plan sets out the research and management actions necessary to support survival of one or more migratory, marine, conservation dependant or cetacean species listed under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (the EPBC Act), which are not considered endangered or vulnerable, but would benefit from a nationally coordinated approach to conservation. This is the first Wildlife Conservation Plan developed under the Act.

Australia is already involved in a wide range of activities that promote the conservation of migratory shorebirds, both within Australia and across the East Asian - Australasian Flyway. This Plan recognises that there are a range of Government agencies, non-Government organisations, research groups, industry, community groups and volunteers that are contributing to these activities in Australia and that the successful implementation of the Plan relies on the continued involvement of these organisations and people.

This Plan outlines national activities to support flyway shorebird conservation initiatives and provides a strategic framework to ensure these activities plus future research and management actions are integrated and remain focused on the long-term survival of migratory shorebird populations and their habitats.

The Plan contains the statutory elements as legislated by the EPBC Act. Detailed background information outlining the conservation activities currently being conducted in Australia, as well as information on the biology, population status and threats to the migratory shorebirds covered by this plan can be found in the accompanying Background paper.

This Plan must be reviewed every five years.