Threatened Species Scientific Committee members

The current members are:

Professor Helene Marsh (Qld) (Chair)

Professor Helene Marsh

Professor Helene Marsh

Professor Helene Marsh was appointed to the Committee in August 2011. She is a conservation biologist with some 30 years experience in research into species conservation, management and policy with particular reference to tropical marine and terrestrial wildlife of conservation concern. The policy outcomes of her research include significant contributions to the science base of dugong conservation in Australia and internationally. Her research also provided the conceptual basis for the 'Back on Track' Program conducted by the Queensland government. Helene is committed to informing interdisciplinary solutions to conservation problems and has collaborated widely with colleagues in other disciplines.

Helene is a Fellow of the Australian Academy of Technological Sciences and Engineering and has received international awards for her research and conservation from the Pew Charitable Trust, the Society of Conservation Biology and the American Society of Mammalogists. She is President –Elect of the Society of Marine Mammalogy and Co–chair of the IUCN Sirenia Specialist Group. She is on the editorial boards of Conservation Biology, Endangered Species Research and Oecologia.

Helene is Dean of Graduate Research Studies and Distinguished Professor of Environmental Science at James Cook University. Her publications include two books, 130+ papers in professional journals, ~30 chapters in refereed monographs/conference proceedings, more than 30 papers in conference/workshop proceedings, plus numerous technical reports and popular articles. Helene has been on the supervisory committees of more than 80 honours students, research higher degree candidates and postdoctoral fellows. She is anticipating her 50th PhD student to graduate in 2012.

Dr Sue McIntyre (ACT/NSW)

Dr Sue McIntyre

Dr Sue McIntyre

Dr Sue McIntyre was appointed to the Committee in November 2012. She is a plant ecologist with over 30 years research experience in native vegetation conservation and management. She has worked at the University of Melbourne, the University of New England and for the last 20 years at CSIRO where she is a Senior Principal Research Scientist. She is also currently a Research Associate with the Fenner School of Environment and Society, Australian National University. She has published over 120 published papers including 79 refereed journal papers, and has over 4,800 citations. Topics of publication include disturbance ecology, invasion ecology, conservation biology, plant functional types and landscape ecology. She has major expertise in the grasslands and grassy eucalypt woodlands and the integration of conservation management and production in rural landscapes. Her work has influenced policy in relation to vegetation protection, management of remnant vegetation, landscape planning, and the development of stewardship programs for endangered grassy woodlands.

Dr McIntyre's advisory and research leadership roles have included membership of the Council for Sustainable Vegetation Management (1997-2000), Task leader for the international Global Change and Terrestrial Ecosystems program (Task 2.2.1 Responses of Vegetation to Land Use and Disturbance 1997-2001), membership of Land and Water Australia's Native Vegetation R&D Program Management Advisory Committee (2000-2002), member of the Expert Panel on grassland management of Belconnen Naval Base (Department of Defence 2007) and a member of the advisory committee for the Victorian Government's Remnant Native Vegetation Investigation 2008-11. She is currently a board director of Bush Heritage Australia.

Dr Sarah Legge (WA)

Dr Sarah Legge

Dr Sarah Legge

Sarah Legge is wildlife ecologist with over 20 years of research and conservation management experience. She has been a member of the Commonwealth Government’s Threatened Species Scientific Committee since 2012, and is also on Birdlife’s Threatened Species Committee. She is one of the leaders of the newly-formed Threatened Species Recovery Hub (part of the National Environmental Science Program), based out of the University of Queensland.  Until recently, Sarah worked for the Australian Wildlife Conservancy, where she developed and led its Conservation and Science program for several years. This role included designing AWC’s ecological monitoring program to measure and report on conservation performance, overseeing AWC’s species reintroduction program, and developing a strategic research portfolio on threatened species and threat management. In the Kimberley, Sarah worked with a small team of AWC staff and students on a number of large-scale adaptive management and strategic research projects, focussing on the mechanisms for recovering threatened and declining species, and restoring ecological integrity. This included collaborating with government, local pastoralists and indigenous communities to develop an award-winning regional fire management program (EcoFire), which transformed fire patterns over 4 million hectares of the central and north Kimberley, and helped to catalyse fire management change more broadly over much of the region. Sarah has authored 1 book, over 80 peer-reviewed publications (in the fields of evolutionary ecology, wildlife ecology, threat management), and many technical reports and popular articles.

Professor Stuart Bunn (Qld)

Professor Stuart Bunn

Professor Stuart Bunn

Professor Bunn is the Director of the Australian Rivers Institute at Griffith University in Brisbane, Australia.  His major research interests are in the ecology of river and wetland systems with a particular focus on the science to underpin river management.   This research has resulted in over 200 technical publications, most of which are refereed journal papers and conference proceedings.

Stuart has extensive experience working with international and Australian government agencies on water resource management issues.From 2008-2012, he was appointed as an Australian National Water Commissioner and has previously served as Chair of the Scientific Advisory Panel for the Lake Eyre Basin Ministerial Forum and as a Director of Land and Water Australia. He is currently Chair of the Executive Scientific Expert Panel for the Southeast Queensland Healthy Waterways Partnership and a member of the Advisory Committee for Social, Economic and Environment Science for the Murray-Darling Basin Authority.  He is also a member of the Scientific Steering Committee for the Global Water System Project.

In 2007, Professor Bunn was awarded the Australian Society for Limnology Medal “in recognition of his outstanding contribution to research and management of Australia’s inland waters”.

Professor David Keith (NSW)

Professor David Keith

Professor David Keith

David Keith is Professor of Botany at the University of New South Wales, deputy director of the Centre for Ecosystem Science and Senior Principal Research Scientist at the NSW Office of Environment and Heritage where he has worked as an ecologist since 1986. His research activities include field and modelling studies of the dynamics of plant populations, communities and their habitats and their application to the conservation of biodiversity.

David leads long term research projects on the dynamics of heathland, mallee, upland swamp and grassy woodland ecosystems within the Australian Long Term Ecological Research Network. These have helped to advance understanding of interactions between native vegetation and bushfire, climate change, grazing and diseases.

Several of David's studies have assessed risks and management options for species of threatened flora and fauna, as well as threatened ecological communities. His research also contributed to the development, testing and application of conservation risk assessment methods, including Red List methods for both species and ecosystems. He lead the scientific development of IUCN Red List criteria for ecosystems and co-leads the Red List of Ecosystems theme within IUCN's Commission on Ecosystem Management.

David served on the NSW Scientific Committee (2003-2008), the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species Standards and Petitions Subcommittee, and chairs the IUCN Committee for Scientific Standard of the Red List of Ecosystems. He has authored more than 110 peer-reviewed scientific papers and an award-winning book, 'Ocean shores to desert dunes: the native vegetation of New South Wales and the ACT'.

Professor Kingsley Dixon (WA)

Professor Kingsley Dixon

Professor Kingsley Dixon

Profess Kingsley Dixon is a Botanist, conservation biologist and restoration ecologist working out of the Science laboratories at Kings Park and Botanic Garden where he was responsible for development of a major restoration and conservation research focus on Australian species and ecosystems (terrestrial and marine environments) and more broadly on drylands globally. Research is focused on implementing integrated conservation and restoration combines the fundamentals of genetic diversity, ex situ long-term conservation of germplasm and rebuilding of damaged landscapes and ecosystems that include repatriation of threatened plant species. Fundamental research includes plant nutritional research (mycorrhizal systems, heterotrophy), seed science and dormancy research, cryogenics and pollination ecology. Author of ten books and over 300 research articles including Science and Nature and recipient of the Linnean Medal for Botany (2013) and a number of other international and national awards. Board member of the Society for Ecological Restoration and Foundation Chair of the Society for Ecological Restoration Australasia.

Dr Nicola Mitchell (WA)

Dr Nicola Mitchell

Dr Nicola Mitchell

Dr Nicola Mitchell was appointed to the Committee in April 2015. She is an physiological ecologist focused on anticipating and mitigating the impacts of environmental change on threatened species. She has worked primarily with amphibians and reptiles for the past 20 years, with research locations ranging from alpine Tasmania, to the Kimberley, to offshore islands in New Zealand. She is currently a Senior Lecturer in the School of Animal Biology at the University of Western Australia (UWA) where she leads an active research group using skills in developmental and thermal biology, environmental modelling and genetics to investigate the capacity of vertebrate species to adapt to climate change. Her research publications focus on temperature-dependent sex determination in reptiles and on emerging conservation strategies such as assisted migration.

Dr Mitchell works with state conservation agencies in research collaborations on sea turtles and the western swamp turtle, as a Recovery Team member, and is a member of the International Herpetological Committee of the World Congress of Herpetology. She has worked with the citizen science program ClimateWatch since its inception and has embedded the program in first year biology teaching at UWA.

Professor Colin Simpfendorfer (QLD)

Professor Colin Simpfendorfer is the Director of the Centre for Sustainable Tropical Fisheries and Aquaculture within the College of Marine and Environmental Sciences at James Cook University. His research interests are in the fields of shark and ray biology, ecology, fisheries and conservation. He had worked in Australia and the USA as a research scientist for government, academia and a private research laboratory. Throughout his career he has conducted research that is aimed to improve the management and conservation of sharks, rays and other marine predators.

Colin has extensive experience in providing scientific advice to fisheries management and conservation agencies. He is currently the Co-Chair of the IUCN’s Shark Specialist Group. He had previously served as the Chair of the Australian Fisheries Management Authority’s Shark Resources Assessment Group, and the US National Marine Fisheries Service’s Smalltooth Sawfish Recovery Team. He has served on numerous fisheries management committees, including the Queensland Shark Panel, Queensland Reef Management Advisory Committee and Western Australian Demersal Gillnet and Demersal Longline Fishery Management Advisory Committee.

Colin has published over 150 scientific papers and continues an active research program supervising postgraduate students and collaborating with colleagues in Australia and overseas.

Dr David Kendal (Vic)

Dr David Kendal

Dr David Kendal

Dave is a research fellow at the Australian Research Centre for Urban Ecology, a division of the Royal Botanic Gardens Victoria, and an honorary fellow in the School of Biosciences, University of Melbourne. Dave is an urban ecologist who specialises in human perceptions of nature, and the ecology of cultivated and remnant vegetation in human settlements. Dave has over 10 years of experience in research and consulting projects exploring people’s attitudes, beliefs and values towards nature, and the ecological patterns that are the outcome of these social drivers. Recent projects have explored the general public’s values for publicly managed natural land in Victoria, the influences shaping manager decision making in urban grassland conservation reserves, and landholder and manager awareness of national environmental law protecting grasslands across western Victoria.

Dr Hamish Campbell (NSW)

Dr Hamish Campbell

Dr Hamish Campbell

Hamish Campbell is an animal ecologist with over 20 years research experience. He has published over 80 papers in referred journals or conference proceedings, and edited two book chapters. He currently leads the Movement & Landscape Ecology Laboratory at the University of New England, which studies the animal-habitat relationship across all taxa. As well as field-based research Hamish is interested in big-data and the development of collaborative cyber-infrastructure to improve the sharing and reuse of ecological data between scientists and natural resource managers. He has co-authored a number of web-based research platforms, and acted as a consultant on state and federal species recovery and management plans. He sits on the editorial board for the scientific journal Austral Ecology.