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Fort Lytton, 160 South St, Lytton, QLD, Australia

Photographs View Photo Database Record
List Register of the National Estate (Non-statutory archive)
Class Historic
Legal Status Registered (25/03/1986)
Place ID 14080
Place File No 4/01/001/0212
Statement of Significance
Historically, Fort Lytton is significant for its association with the development of Colonial fortifications as a defence against the perceived threat from hostile European powers during the latter half of the nineteenth century (Criterion A.4). The complex is the only major fortified position within the Brisbane area and as such is regarded as a regionally rare example of nineteenth century military engineering (Criterion B.2).
Official Values Not Available
Description
During the 1870s Australia's isolation and small population made her sensitive to European expansion in the pacific, and fears of a Russion attack were persistant. Investigations were carried out by Sir William Jervois and Lieutenant Colonel Peter Scratchley regarding Australia's defences and their 1877 report recommended that Brisbane should be protected by defences established at Lytton, at the mouth of the Brisbane River. Fort Lytton was subsequently developed as an intricate defence complex surrounded by a moat which originally connected with the river. The fort was the main line of defence up to and including World War One, but during world war two main lines of defence were established on Bribie and Moreton Islands, at the northern entrance to Moreton Bay. Guns on these islands were placed to sweep across and protect the major part of the waters of Moreton Bay and an anti aircraft battery was established at the southern end of Bribie Island. Fort Lytton then became a second line of defence, protecting the southern waters of the bay and the entrance to the Brisbane River. With the development of modern defence weapons and techniques, Fort Lytton became obsolete as an integral part of Australia's coastal defence system, and was abandoned by the Army and the Commonwealth. Fort Lytton is now administered by the Queensland National Parks and Wildlife Service. The fort consists of a fortified concrete and earthen embankment surrounding a central open space. The whole is enclosed by a moat, part of which is now silted up. Concrete gun replacements, magazines and store chambers are buried within the lee of the northern wall facing the river. The plan consists of two pairs of emplacements for large guns with ancillary support. Two rifled 6in guns on the right face commanded the river approach; on the left face, sixty four pounders were to face the river and sweep the foreshore. The complex is the only major fortified position within the Brisbane area. It is an example of nineteenth century military engineering complete with extensive earth works and defences against foot assault.
History Not Available
Condition and Integrity
Two of the emplacements have been modified to suit improving military technology but the remaining structures are substantially as built. No military equipment remains on the site. The massive timber entry gates were reconstructed in 1966.
Location
About 6.8ha, 160 South Street (Lytton Road), Fort Lytton National Park, Lytton.
Bibliography
HOGAN, JANET : BUILDING QUEENSLAND'S HERITAGE (NATIONAL TRUST OF
QUEENSLAND, RICHMOND, VIC, 1978)
DOAK, FRANK : AUSTRALIAN DEFENCE HERITAGE - THE BUILDINGS,
ESTABLISHMENTS AND SITES OF OUR MILITARY HISTORY THAT HAVE BECOME PART
OF THE NATIONAL ESTATE (FAIRFAX LIBRARY, BROADWAY, NSW, 1988)

Report Produced  Thu Aug 28 01:44:44 2014