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Ulandra Nature Reserve, Bethungra, NSW, Australia

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List Register of the National Estate (Non-statutory archive)
Class Natural
Legal Status Registered (30/06/1992)
Place ID 708
Place File No 1/06/313/0001
Statement of Significance
This nature reserve constitutes a highly important remnant of regionally representative open forest in the agricultural district of the south-west slopes, dominated by CALLITRIS ENDLICHERI and a variety of eucalypts. These vegetation types do not survive within the region to any great extent beyond this reserve. The reserve contains the invasive ornamental ACACIA BAILEYANA growing in a portion of its relatively restricted natural distribution.

The reserve also appears to furnish critical reproductive and foraging resources for the threatened superb parrot (POLYTELIS SWAINSONII) as well as significant habitat for another vulnerable bird species, the turquoise parrot (NEOPHEMA PULCHELLA). Moreover, it represents almost a sole habitat isolate for many species which can be regarded as regionally uncommon due to the extent of clearing, and for irruptive/migratory nectarivorous and insectivorous passerines. Included within Ulandra Nature Reserve is a relatively undisturbed catchment (feeding Merrybundinah Creek); such a phenomenon is a rarity within an agriculturally transformed landscape of this type.
Official Values Not Available
Description
Ulandra Nature Reserve covers an area of residual wooded hills of the Ulandra Range which occurs in an extensively cleared agricultural district between Junee and Cootamundra. The terrain is hilly with rough rocky ridges, some steep sided gulllies and a broader gently sloping physiographic unit to the east which includes an important, almost entire catchment which feeds into Merrybundindah Creek. Mount Ulandra rises to 761m and most of the reserve is above 500m elevation. Vegetation of the area is mostly open forest of cypress pine (CALLITRIS ENDLICHERI), a vegetation type which is very poorly conserved in the south-western slopes region. CALLITRIS is scattered throughout the reserve, its density varying in response to topographic variation. Associated tree species are bundy (EUCALYPTUS GONIOCALYX), Blakely's red gum (E. BLAKELYI), Dwyer's mallee gum (E. DWYERI), red stringybark (E. MACRORHYNCHA) and Bridge's apple box (E. BRIDGESIANA). There are localised occurrences of the yellow box (E. MELLIODORA), red gum (E. CAMALDULENSIS) association. Shrub and herb layers exhibit very variable development throughout the open forest. A number of wattles including the well known and ornamentally valued ACACIA BAILEYANA growing in a portion of its comparatively restricted natural range, occur with other shrubs and numerous species of sclerophyllous graminoids and forbs. Documentation of the reserve's fauna is poor. There are records of the grey kangaroo (MACROPUS GIGANTEUS) and swamp wallaby (WALLABIA BICOLOR) representing the macropods, of the brush tailed and ring tailed possums (TRICHOSURUS VULPECULA and PSEUDOCHEIRUS PEREGRINUS), together with a species of glider (presumably PETAURUS BREVICEPS), among the arboreal group. Mention is also made of an undetermined number of bats and many birds, including wedge tailed eagles (AQUILA AUDAX). It should be noted that the reserve lies within the range of the threatened turquoise parrot (NEOPHEMA PULCHELLA) and within the current breeding area of the superb parrot (POLYTELIS SWAINSONII). The latter species is also regarded as possessing a threatened and declining status and is highly dependent for foraging and breeding habitat on the yellow box red gum association which is represented within the reserve. No indication of the herpetofaunal complement the reserve has been published however observations indicate the presence of some saxicoline and fossorial skinks, some elapid snakes, at least two species of LITORIA and one species of small MYOBATRACHID. Ulandra Reserve shows signs of past damage and yet it comprises the comprehensive superstructure of an ecosystem which is very poorly retained and reserved for conservation purposes in this extensively cleared agricultural district. The rocky knolls and colour contrasts within the canapy of the cypress pine open eucalypt forest presents a pleasing view. This area of low hills supporting vegetation which has significance by virtue of its residual nature is an important refuge area for the region's severely debilitated wildlife.
History Not Available
Condition and Integrity
Ulandra Nature Reserve exhibits some damage due to prior incursions of pastoral clearing (30ha-40ha of Portion 162 have been cleared and are in the process of regenerating) and stock water dam construction, together with continued predation and competition pressure from exotic animals (particularly pigs, SUS SCROFA). Infestations of introduced weeds are visible from the main route into the reserve. This road leads to an inholding within Portion 161 on which telecommunication installations have been constucted. These structures are visible from much of the reserve.
Location
About 3930ha, 4km south-east of Bethungra.
Bibliography
BLAKERS,M., DAVIES,S.J.J.F. AND REILLY,P.N. (1984). THE ATLAS OF
AUSTRALIAN BIRDS. R.A.O.U./MELBOURNE UNIVERSITY PRESS, MELBOURNE.
LEE,R. (1979). PROPOSED MT ULANDRA NATURE RESERVE. UNPUBLISHED
REFERENCE STATEMENT M262, NPWS, SYDNEY.
TOTAL ENVIRONMENT CENTRE (1983) OUR WILDLIFE IN PERIL. REED
SYDNEY.
WEBSTER,R.(1987). THE SUPERB PARROT: A SURVEY OF THE BREEDING
DISTRIBUTION AND HABITAT REQUIREMENTS. UNPUBLISHED REPORT W12.2,
NPWS, SYDNEY:47 pp. AND APP.

Report Produced  Mon Apr 21 05:24:27 2014