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Nindooinbah Homestead, Garden and Outbuildings, Nindooinbah House Rd, Beaudesert, QLD, Australia

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List Register of the National Estate (Non-statutory archive)
Class Historic
Legal Status Registered (22/06/1993)
Place ID 18337
Place File No 4/01/072/0020
Statement of Significance
Ninndooinbah Homestead complex, garden and outbuildings are a rural homestead complex demonstrating a continuum of landuse from 1841. Nindooinbah is a representative example of a Queensland country Federation Bungalow in the detailing and encircling veranda. The accommodation unit (formerly the manager's house, the woolshed (formerly worker's accommodation), the gatehouse (formerly a detached kitchen) and the studio (formerly workers Cook's accommodation) are nineteenth century buildings, demonstrating period structural techniques, built to serve pastoral farm practices (Criterion D.2). The main residence displays the influence of the Queensland architect Robin Dods with his characteristic linear planning and concern with climatic control. The garden also demonstrates the particular style characteristics of Dods, with palms, tropical plants and compartmentalized areas (Criterion F.1). The garden is an uncommon example of a Federation geometric style expressed in a rural homestead garden (Criterion B 2).
Official Values Not Available
Description
Nindooinbah Station was first settled by Paul and Clement Lawless in 1841, who were early settlers in south-east Queensland. They established a homestead and introduced sheep to the valley. The Lawless family later moved to Burnett and sold their lease to Mr W A Campigne, who later became a member of the Legislative Council formed in Queensland after its separation from New South Wales. The property then belonged to Captain Towns who was a pioneer of the sugar industry in Queensland and with others was responsible for the introduction of Kanaka labour. Nindooinbah was sold to Barker and White and subdivided under the Closer Settlement Act of 1868. John Collins and Sons leased the property in 1906 and it became the homestead of William Collins. In 1909 Collins died, leaving the property to his wife and family. During Campigne's time the original Georgian style home with fine detailing was built. When William Collins owned the property, the architect Robin Dods was employed to design extensions and alterations. Dods' alterations were sympathetic to the original house. He extended the house to the south, adding a new entrance, kitchen wing, bedrooms and dining room. The plan is symmetrical in the form of a U-surrounded by large verandahs which connect to the garden by two broad timber stairs on the east. These stairways and pergola above were designed by Dods, however they have been altered. The entrance leads to an informal entrance and living room, which was typical of Dods planning. The entry has a tent like ceiling in polished timber, the walls are stained timber with polished floors and joinery. From this room verandahs connect the main rooms of the houses, which is the only method of circulation. The dining room is panelled and contains Dod's decorative plaster work. The house is generally only of one room's depth, which allows cross ventilation through the shaded verandahs. Other typical features of Dods' include the skilled planning with the use of the linear plan for cross ventilation, an encircling veranda and bay windows projecting into the veranda. The planning was practical with bathrooms located near bedrooms. The more distinctive characteristics of Dods' houses such as the enlarged timber detailing are not evident in this house and much of his original details on the entrance pergolas have been removed. Original nineteenth century buildings remain consisting of the woolshed (formerly worker's accommodation) and barns built of massive timber from compigne's time. The studio (formerly the workers Cook's accommodation) and the gatehouse (formerly the detached kitchen of the main residence) also remain. The garden was redeveloped after the extensions to the house by R S Dods c 1906 and exhibit characteristics of the garden style of Dods consisting of avenues of palms, a grotto, stone paving and compartmentalised areas. The garden slopes towards the valley floorand views form the garden extend across lagoons to the Mcpherson Ranges. In recent years a pond with a tea house has been added and some old buildings relocated for new use.
History Not Available
Condition and Integrity
The original house was extended in 1906 by R S Dods. The pergolas, designed by Dods to define the entrance have been removed. (Assessed in 1985)
The gardens are also believed to be designed by Dods and have had some small changes and extensions. Nineteenth century outbuildings have had some modifications for changing uses and some have been relocated. Despite these changes the buildings and gardens have historic integrity and are in an excellent condition. (1991)
Location
About 25ha, 4.6km south-east of Beaudesert, Nindooinbah House Road corner Nindooinbah Connection Road, comprising the homestead, garden and outbuildings, with the area bounded by the alignment of the power line around the complex on its northern, western and southern sides, and by a straight line joining AMG points: 95414-Canungra 045994 and 050002 on the eastern side of the complex.
Bibliography
COX, P. AND STACEY, W. THE AUSTRALIAN HOMESTEAD. LANDOWNE, 1972
VOGUE LIVING, MAY 1984. "WITH AN ONGOING GRACE" AND "CULTIVATED
FRIENDS".
ALL SAINTS TAMROOKUM, "AN HISTORICAL ASSESSMENT AND PHYSICAL SURVEY",
1983. (R. RIDDEL)
LUND, H.NEVILLE, "ROBIN DODS, 1868-1920",ARCHITECTS OF AUSTRALIA,
MACMILLAN, SOUTH MELBOURNE,1981.
GUEST, S. PRIVATE GARDENS OF AUSTRALIA. LOTHIAN PUBLICATIONS,
MELBOURNE, 1990.

Report Produced  Wed Aug 27 19:20:33 2014