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Eleocharis parodii

Description
 

Parodi Spike Rush (Eleocharis parodii) is a slender tufted perennial sedge, with a short rhizome (underground stem). Flowering stems (culms) are 20-45 cm high, pith-filled, round in cross-section, and 2-5 mm in diameter. The leaves are reduced to brownish sheaths enclosing the base of the flowering stems. The spike-like flower head is cylindrical, 2-3 cm long, 2-4 mm in diameter, and looks like a continuation of the stem. Floral bracts (modified leaves) are about 2 mm long, yellow-brown, with a broad translucent margin. The 6-7 whitish bristles are slightly shorter than the nut. The pale brown or greenish grey nut has 3 ribbed angles, is egg-shaped, about 0.8 mm long and about 0.5 mm in diameter. The small persistent style-base on top of the nut is about a sixth as long as and about a quarter as broad as the nut, and is separated from the nut by a narrow neck (Wilson 1993).

For further information and assistance with identification of Parodi Spike Rush contact the herbarium in your state or territory.

Distribution:

Parodi Spike Rush was first collected near Griffith, New South Wales, in 1977, where it occurred over less than 1 hectare. In early 2006 it was considered to be eradicated but ongoing monitoring was recommended. It is not known to be naturalised elsewhere in Australia (Cunningham & Brown 2006).

Potentially, Parodi Spike Rush could spread to other irrigation areas and wetlands in temperate mainland Australia and possibly Tasmania (Sainty & Associates 2004).

Habit:Herb, Aquatic
Key points:
  • Parodi Spike Rush (Eleocharis parodii) is a perennial sedge native to Argentina.
  • It grows in wet places like irrigation channels and rice crops.
  • In Australia, it is only known from one infestation near Griffith, New South Wales, which is now thought to have been eradicated.
  • Potentially, it could spread to become a problem in man-made and natural wetlands in southern Australia.
How it spreads:

Dispersal of Parodi Spike Rush is likely to occur by nuts being eaten by water birds or being transported in water or in mud on birds' feet or on other animals or farming equipment. Dispersal could also happen by spread of displaced rhizomes in water or with mud (Sainty & Associates 2004; Wilson 2007, pers. comm.).

Where it grows:

Parodi Spike Rush grows in wet habitats, with at least semi-permanent water. This can include irrigation channels as well as natural waterbodies (Wilson 2007, pers. comm.).

Flower colour:Yellow, Green
Distribution map:

http://www.weeds.org.au/cgi-bin/weedident.cgi?tpl=plant.tpl&ibra=all&card=W17 

Impacts:

Potentially, Parodi Spike Rush could impact on irrigation channels and irrigated crops such as rice, as well as natural wetlands, in southern Australia (Cunningham & Brown 2006; Wilson 2007, pers. comm.).

Origin:

Parodi Spike Rush is a perennial sedge native to Argentina (Cunningham & Brown 2006).

It is not known to be naturalised anywhere else outside its natural range (Cunningham & Brown 2006).

History:

Parodi Spike Rush was probably introduced into Australia accidentally with contaminated rice seed or farming equipment (Wilson 2007, pers. comm.).

Parodi Spike Rush was first collected near Griffith, New South Wales, in 1977, where it occurred over less than 1 hectare. It has not been seen there since 2000. The irrigation channel where it was growing was filled in and replaced by a pipe in 2003 (Sainty & Associates 2004). In early 2006 it was considered to be eradicated but ongoing monitoring was recommended. It is not known to be naturalised elsewhere in Australia (Cunningham & Brown 2006).

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This database is designed to provide information, including biological and ecological, on invasive plant species that are on a national weed list, or are legislated against in a state or territory. While reasonable efforts have been made to ensure the accuracy of the information, no guarantee is given, nor responsibility taken, by the Commonwealth for its accuracy, currency or completeness. The Commonwealth does not accept any responsibility for any loss or damage that may be occasioned directly or indirectly through the use of, or reliance on, the information contained in this database. The information contained in this database does not necessarily represent the views of the Commonwealth. This database is not intended to be a complete source of information on the matters it deals with. For further information on the images contained in the database please contact the copyright owner. All images in the weed identification tool are managed by the Australian Plant Image Index (APII). Various copyright conditions apply for these images. For further information on the copyright conditions of images contained in the database please contact the APII at: photo@anbg.gov.au.