Biodiversity

Species Profile and Threats Database


For information to assist proponents in referral, environmental assessments and compliance issues, refer to the Policy Statements and Guidelines (where available), the Conservation Advice (where available) or the Listing Advice (where available).
 
In addition, proponents and land managers should refer to the Recovery Plan (where available) or the Conservation Advice (where available) for recovery, mitigation and conservation information.

EPBC Act Listing Status Listed as Endangered
Listing and Conservation Advices Commonwealth Listing Advice on Pultenaea trichophylla (Tufted Bush-pea) (Threatened Species Scientific Committee (TSSC), 2009bs) [Listing Advice].
 
Commonwealth Conservation Advice on Pultenaea trichophylla (Tufted Bush-pea) (Threatened Species Scientific Committee (TSSC), 2009bx) [Conservation Advice].
 
Recovery Plan Decision Recovery Plan required, included on the Commenced List (1/11/2009).
 
Adopted/Made Recovery Plans
Federal Register of
    Legislative Instruments
Declaration under s178, s181, and s183 of the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 - List of threatened species, List of threatened ecological communities and List of threatening processes (Commonwealth of Australia, 2000) [Legislative Instrument].
 
Amendment to the list of threatened species under section 178 of the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (86) (17/11/2009) (Commonwealth of Australia, 2009f) [Legislative Instrument].
 
State Government
    Documents and Websites
SA:Draft recovery plan for 23 threatened flora taxa on Eyre Peninsula, South Australia 2007-2012 (Pobke, K., 2007) [State Recovery Plan].
State Listing Status
SA: Listed as Rare (National Parks and Wildlife Act 1972 (South Australia): Rare species: June 2011 list)
Scientific name Pultenaea trichophylla [12715]
Family Fabaceae:Fabales:Magnoliopsida:Magnoliophyta:Plantae
Species author H.B.Will. ex J.Black
Infraspecies author  
Reference Black, J.M. (1924), Flora of South Australia Pt. 2: 301
Distribution map Species Distribution Map

This is an indicative distribution map of the present distribution of the species based on best available knowledge. See map caveat for more information.

Illustrations Google Images
http://www.flora.sa.gov.au/cgi-bin/texhtml.cgi?form=speciesfacts&family=&genus=Pultenaea&species=trichophylla&iname=&submit=Search

Scientific name: Pultenaea trichophylla

Common name: Tufted Bush-pea

Tufted Bush-pea is a small slender shrub to 20–50 cm high, with reddish ascending or prostrate branches, small leaves and red and yellow pea flowers (Jessop & Toelken 1986).

Tufted Bush-pea leaves are (Jessop & Toelken 1986):

  • 8–10 mm long by 1–1.5 mm wide
  • mostly crowded at the end of branches on leaf stalks (petioles) 2–3 cm long
  • lance shaped (lanceolate) tapering to a fine (but not sharp) pointy tip (mucro) about 5 mm long
  • hairless on the topside but with long soft hairs underneath
  • concave above
  • three nerved.

Tufted Bush-pea bracts (stipules) at the base of the leaves are lance shaped (lanceolate), pointy tipped (acute), brown, hairless, and do not totally cover the branches to which they are attached. Flowers are about 7 mm long and are attached to very short stalks (subsessile) and are situated on the ends of small branches (branchlets) but somewhat hidden by the surrounding longer leaves. At the base of the flower sepals (calyx) there are small leaf like structure (bracteoles) which are only 1 mm long, triangular shaped and brown and leathery. At the base of the flower stalk there also is 2–3 leaf like structures (bracts) which are 1 mm long, leathery, dark brown and without teeth. Each flower consists of a wing like petal; and an outer, and two inner, petals which are not wing-like. The outer, not wing-like petal of the flower (standard) is yellow with red veins and nearly twice as long as the sepals (Jessop & Toelken 1986).

Tufted Bush-pea is endemic to Eyre Peninsula, where it is is confined to 20 subpopulations in the Koppio Hills between Tod River Reservoir (in the south) to just north of Ungarra (in the north) (Adelaide Herbarium 2005; Pobke 2007; SA DEH 2005a). Subpopulations occur in small patches of remnant vegetation interspersed by cleared land (TSSC 2009bs). The species is confined to the Eyre Hills subregion of the Eyre Yorke Block Interim Biogeographic Regionalisation Region of Australia (IBRA) and the Eyre Peninsula Natural Resource Management Region.

Freebairn (2003) suggested that the Tufted Bush-pea occurred along the Port Lincoln-Buckleboo Railway between Port Lincoln and Ungarra, however, this record is probably a misidentification.

Tufted Bush-pea is estimated to have an extent of occurrence of 162 km² (TSSC 2009bs). Extent of occurrence was determined using post-1990 data from the Adelaide Herbarium database (Adelaide Herbarium 2005) and the South Australia Department of Environment and Heritage (SA DEH) databases (SA DEH 2005a). A possible occurrence decline of 12% has been estimated since the 1960s. No future trends have been predicted (SA DEH 2005a).

Tufted Bush-pea is estimated to have a area of occupancy of less than 1 km² (TSSC 2009bs) or 0.295 km² (Freebairn & Pobke 2005). It is likely that significant area of occupancy declines have occurred due to 75% of the native vegetation habitat being cleared (Freebairn 2003; SA DEH 2002a), however, it is unknown whether this clearing is historical or recent (since the 1990s). No future occupancy trends are predicted (SA DEH 2005a).

The Tufted Bush-pea may be considered fragmented as subpopulations occur in isolated remnant vegetation interspersed by cleared land and roads (Freebairn & Pobke 2005).

Road verges of most major roads over the range of the Tufted Bush-pea (between Tod River Reservoir in the south to Ungarra in the north) have been searched. Not all private land containing suitable native vegetation has been searched (SA DEH 2005a).

At least 20 subpopulations of Tufted Bush-pea totaling in excess of 10 500 plants survive on Eyre Peninsula (Pobke 2007). Some subpopulations have exhibited minor declines or gradual declines in individuals, however, this is not indicative of broader scale declines (SA DEH 2005a). Mass germination was observed following the Wangarry fires in 2005 (SA DEH 2005a).

The following table presents subpopulation information for the Tufted Bush-pea (Adelaide Herbarium 2005; SA DEH 2005a):

Location Tenure Total plants Area Last survey
Section 207 Hundred of Koppio Private property (heritage agreement) (and extends onto adjacent roadside) 1000 (5000 including roadside area) 150 000 m² (includes roadside area) 1995–1996
Section 250 Hundred of Koppio Private property (heritage agreement) 1250 80 000 m² 1995–1996
Section 44 Hundred of Koppio Private property (heritage agreement) 1000   1995–1996
Section 131 Hundred of Hutchinson Private property (heritage agreement) "Extensive"   1995–1996
Section 98 Hundred of Stokes (west side of Nyllow Hill) Private property 500   1994–1995
Section 31 Hundred of Stokes Private property 1000   1994–1995
Tucknott Scrub Conservation Park Conservation park 100   1994–1995
Tucknott Scrub Conservation Park Conservation park 12   1994–1995
Section 107 Hundred of Stokes Private property 1000   1994–1995
"Koppio" Private property 28 900 m² 1994–1995
Section 197 Hundred of Koppio Private property 100   1994–1995
Section 128 Hundred of Koppio Private property     1994–1995
Section 130 Hundred of Hutchinson Private property     1994–1995
Section 132 Hundred of Hutchinson Private property     1994–1995
The road adjacent to Nyllow Park Station Roadside 66 30 000 m² Early 1990s
The road to Uranno (adjacent to Oolanta Creek) Roadside 500 52 500 m² Early 1990s
The road to Yallundra Flat from Uranno Roadside 13   Early 1990s

The generation length of Tufted Bush-pea is unknown although monitoring has shown plants are able to live at least ten years (SA DEH 2005a). However, monitoring of 27 plants over six years found that 37% of plants died apparently due to age, indicating that the species is only moderately long-lived (Jusaitis & Smith 1998).

Tufted Bush-pea occurs in Tucknott Scrub Conservation and had an estimated 100 plants in 1994–1995 (SA DEH 2005a). At least four subpopulations of the Tufted Bush-pea occur on private land protected under four separate conservation covenants. These areas contain at least 3250 plants in 1995–1996 (SA DEH 2005a).

The Tufted Bush-pea grows on (Adelaide Herbarium 2005; SA DEH 2005a):

  • pale brown or grey, acidic, sandy or clay loam over ironstone in gullies, on hillcrests and on undulating plains
  • acidic gravelly sandy loam in open depressions
  • lateritic soils on hill slopes with outcropping quartzite
  • hard, red-brown clay loam over laterite on the slopes of hills and gullies.

Tufted Bush-pea associated vegetation includes (Adelaide Herbarium 2005; SA DEH 2005a):

  • Sugar Gum (Eucalyptus cladocalyx) woodlands over an understorey dominated by Broom Honey-myrtle (Melaleuca uncinata) and other shrubs
  • tall shrublands dominated by Broom Honey-myrtle and Acacia spp. over sparse low shrubs
  • E. peninsularis low woodland/mallee over a sparse understorey dominated by Broom Honey-myrtle, Tate's Grass Tree (Xanthorrhoea semiplana subsp. tateana), and low shrubs
  • Drooping Sheoak (Allocasuarina verticillata) low open woodland over Peppermint Box (E. odorata) and Ridge-fruited Mallee (E. angulosa) over a shrubby understorey
  • Ridge-fruited Mallee and Narrow-leaved Red Mallee (E. foecunda) over an understorey dominated by Broom Honey-myrtle and other shrubs.

Tufted Bush-pea flowering occurs progressively along the stems between September–February, but mainly from November, with seed dehiscing (being discharged from the capsule) in February–March. No pollinators have been observed (Jusaitis 1991; Jusaitis & Sorensen 1994). Jusaitis and Sorensen (1994) measured seasonal growth of individual plants from two of the populations between 1990–1994 and found that the main growth flush took place during the spring and early summer with little or no growth occurring between autumn and winter.

The Tufted Bush-pea is only moderately long-lived and is not dependant on fire for seedling germination (Jusaitis & Smith 1998). This species cannot self-pollinate, indicating that reduced seed production may occur in small isolated subpopulations with low genetic diversity (Jusaitis & Sorensen 1994).

Vegetation clearence and fragmentation
Jusaitis and Sorensen (1994a) describe past declines in Tufted Bush-pea numbers as largely being a result of the clearance of its habitat. This species is largely confined to the Hundreds of Stokes, Koppio and Hutchinson area's where over 88%, 77% and 84% of native vegetation has been cleared, respectively (Freebairn 2003). The species is also confined to the Eyre Hills IBRA Subregion, where 88% of remaining blocks of native vegetation are 20 ha or smaller in size (SA DEH 2002a).

The plant communities in which the Tufted Bush-pea largely occurs have been the more heavily targeted for clearance for agriculture due to the heavier soils on which they occur. Consequently most populations of this species now occur in small patches of remnant vegetation interspersed by cleared land (Pobke 2007) and are at increased extinction risk at many sites due to their close proximity to agricultural land and roads.

Road site disturbance
At roadside sites, the Tufted Bush-pea is under threat from chemical drift, weed invasion and disturbance from road and fence maintenance activities (TSSC 2009bs). Pobke (2007) highlighted the importance of roadside subpopulations for gene flow between larger populations, but noted that roadside populations are greatly depleted (less than 500 individuals).

Grazing
Jusaitis and Sorensen (1994a) observed that the Tufted Bush-pea is palatable to stock. Jusaitis and Sorensen (1995b) described most subpopulations occurring on private land as being unfenced from livestock, and this is a continuing threat.

Experimental trials and field observations described in Jusaitis and Sorensen (1997a) and Jusaitis and Smith (1998) indicated the species is able to regenerate following moderately heavy pruning, however, plants are killed with the removal of all above-ground biomass.

Weed invasion and disease
Bridal Creeper (Asparagus asparagoides) is a serious weed in woodland communities on Southern Eyre Peninsula and is able to readily outcompete small shrub species like the Tufted Bush-pea (Pokbe 2007). Pultenaea spp. are also susceptible to Phytophthora cinnamomi and this fungal disease is suspected to exist on Eyre Peninsula (Pokbe 2007; SA DEH n.d.).

Fire
Freebairn and Pobke (2005) described the Tufted Bush-pea as being highly vulnerable to localised catastrophic events, such as fire, due to its small extent of occurrence. For example during the 2005 Wangary fire, the majority of Tufted Bush-pea subpopulations occurred in the area affected by the fire (Freebairn & Pobke 2005). Fire regimes are extremely important: fire can stimulate recruitment events, however, too frequent fire will reduce the soil seed bank and too seldom fire (or absence of other disturbance) will cause population senescence (Pokbe 2007).

Minister's Reasons for Recovery Plan decision. Date of decision
Information on, and recommendations for, the Tufted Bush-pea are included in the multi species recovery plan Draft Recovery Plan for 23 Plant Taxa on Eyre Peninsula South Australia 2007-2012 (Pobke 2008). This recovery plan is currently being recommended for adoption at the national level (17/11/2009).

Existing recovery actions
The Tufted Bush-pea is part of the Ark on Eyre project, which started in 2000 and funded by the Eyre Natural Resource Management Region. The regional recovery plan for this area (Pobke 2007) outlines undertaken recovery actions and include:

  • surveys, monitoring, propagation and translocation by Black Hill Flora Centre staff (one of these translocations is described in Jusaitis and Sorensen (1994))
  • seed collection and storage as part of the Millennium Seed Bank Project by SA DEH staff
  • preliminary assessment of two of eleven subpopulations suspected burnt by the Wangary Bushfire by SA DEH staff.

Recommendations for recovery
Pobke (2007), SA DEH (2002a) and the Threatened Species Scientific Committee (TSSC 2009bx) provide general recovery recommendations, and include:

  • habitat restoration and threat abatement (including weed management, browsing pressure, Phytophthora infestation, translocation and revegetation)
  • targeted formal protection and habitat protection
  • rabbit control
  • implementation of roadside markers and signage
  • the reviewing and updating of the recovery plan
  • development and implementation of a suitable fire management strategy.

Research recommendations
Pobke (2007) and the TSSC (2009bx) provide research recommendations, and include:

  • the establishment of monitoring protocols
  • research into the reproductive biology, conservation genetics and fire ecology of the species, and the impact of herbivory, chemical drift and Phytophthora infestation
  • further surveys
  • seed germination trials.

Brief descriptions of the conservation status, distribution, habitat, floral biology, threats, and recovery actions for the Tufted Bush-pea are given in Jusaitis (1991), Jusaitis and Sorensen (1994, a, c, d; 1995a, b: 1996; 1997a, b), Jusaitis and Smith (1998) and Pobke (2007).

The taxonomy of the Tufted Bush-pea is described in Black (1924), Jessop and Toelken (1986) and de Kok and West (2003).

Brief information on, and recommendations for, the Tufted Bush-pea are included in a draft recovery plan for plant taxa on Eyre Peninsula (Pobke 2007) and the Biodiversity Plan for Eyre Peninsula (SA DEH 2002a). Other recommendations are provided in Jusaitis (1991) and Jusaitis and Sorensen (1994, a, c, d; 1995a, b: 1996; 1997a, b).

The following table lists known and perceived threats to this species. Threats are based on the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN) threat classification version 1.1.

Threat Class Threatening Species References
Agriculture and Aquaculture:Agriculture and Aquaculture:Land clearing, habitat fragmentation and/or habitat degradation Pultenaea trichophylla in Species Profile and Threats (SPRAT) database (Department of the Environment and Heritage, 2006wh) [Internet].
Commonwealth Listing Advice on Pultenaea trichophylla (Tufted Bush-pea) (Threatened Species Scientific Committee (TSSC), 2009bs) [Listing Advice].
Agriculture and Aquaculture:Livestock Farming and Grazing:Grazing pressures and associated habitat changes Pultenaea trichophylla in Species Profile and Threats (SPRAT) database (Department of the Environment and Heritage, 2006wh) [Internet].
Commonwealth Listing Advice on Pultenaea trichophylla (Tufted Bush-pea) (Threatened Species Scientific Committee (TSSC), 2009bs) [Listing Advice].
Climate Change and Severe Weather:Habitat Shifting and Alteration:Habitat loss, modification and/or degradation Commonwealth Listing Advice on Pultenaea trichophylla (Tufted Bush-pea) (Threatened Species Scientific Committee (TSSC), 2009bs) [Listing Advice].
Ecosystem/Community Stresses:Indirect Ecosystem Effects:Loss and/or fragmentation of habitat and/or subpopulations Commonwealth Listing Advice on Pultenaea trichophylla (Tufted Bush-pea) (Threatened Species Scientific Committee (TSSC), 2009bs) [Listing Advice].
Human Intrusions and Disturbance:Human Intrusions and Disturbance:Mechanical disturbance during construction, maintanance or recreational activities Pultenaea trichophylla in Species Profile and Threats (SPRAT) database (Department of the Environment and Heritage, 2006wh) [Internet].
Commonwealth Listing Advice on Pultenaea trichophylla (Tufted Bush-pea) (Threatened Species Scientific Committee (TSSC), 2009bs) [Listing Advice].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive Non-Native/Alien Species:Competition and/or habitat degradation Asparagus asparagoides (Bridal Creeper, Bridal Veil Creeper, Smilax, Florist's Smilax, Smilax Asparagus) Commonwealth Listing Advice on Pultenaea trichophylla (Tufted Bush-pea) (Threatened Species Scientific Committee (TSSC), 2009bs) [Listing Advice].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive Non-Native/Alien Species:Vegetation and habitat loss caused by dieback Phytophthora cinnamomi Threat abatement plan for disease in natural ecosystems caused by Phytophthora cinnamomi (Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts (DEWHA), 2009w) [Threat Abatement Plan].
Commonwealth Listing Advice on Pultenaea trichophylla (Tufted Bush-pea) (Threatened Species Scientific Committee (TSSC), 2009bs) [Listing Advice].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Predation, competition, habitat degradation and/or spread of pathogens by introduced species Recovery Plans: Prostanthera eurybioides, Pterostylis arenicola, Acacia cretacea, Pultenaea trichophylla (Jusaitis, M., 1991) [Recovery Plan].
Natural System Modifications:Fire and Fire Suppression:Inappropriate and/or changed fire regimes (frequency, timing, intensity) Commonwealth Listing Advice on Pultenaea trichophylla (Tufted Bush-pea) (Threatened Species Scientific Committee (TSSC), 2009bs) [Listing Advice].
Pollution:Agricultural Effluents:Habitat degradation due to agricultural chemical pollution Commonwealth Listing Advice on Pultenaea trichophylla (Tufted Bush-pea) (Threatened Species Scientific Committee (TSSC), 2009bs) [Listing Advice].
Species Stresses:Indirect Species Effects:Low genetic diversity and genetic inbreeding Commonwealth Listing Advice on Pultenaea trichophylla (Tufted Bush-pea) (Threatened Species Scientific Committee (TSSC), 2009bs) [Listing Advice].
Transportation and Service Corridors:Roads and Railroads:Development and/or maintenance of roads Commonwealth Listing Advice on Pultenaea trichophylla (Tufted Bush-pea) (Threatened Species Scientific Committee (TSSC), 2009bs) [Listing Advice].

Adelaide Herbarium (2005). ADHERB database. South Australia: Department of Environment and Heritage.

Black, J.M. (1924). Flora of South Australia. 2:301.

Freebairn & K. Pobke (2005). Draft recovery plan for 23 threatened flora taxa on Eyre Peninsula, South Australia 2004-2009. [Online]. Port Lincoln, South Australia: Department for Environment and Heritage. Available from: http://www.environment.sa.gov.au/biodiversity/west_bcp/pdfs/draft_recovery_plan_for23.pdf..

Freebairn, A. (2003). Preliminary Report to Environment Australia Regarding the Clearance of Four Flora Species Listed under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 along the Port Lincoln-Buckleboo Railway. Regional Conservation. Adelaide, South Australia: Department for Environment and Heritage.

Jessop, J.P. & H.R. Toelken, eds. (1986). Flora of South Australia. Adelaide, South Australia: SA Government Printing Division.

Jusaitis, M. (1991). Recovery Plans: Prostanthera eurybioides, Pterostylis arenicola, Acacia cretacea, Pultenaea trichophylla. Adelaide, South Australia: Blackhill Flora Centre.

Jusaitis, M. & B. Sorensen (1994). Conservation Studies on Endangered Plant Species from South Australia's Agricultural Regions. Adelaide, South Australia: Black Hill Flora Centre.

Jusaitis, M. & B. Sorensen (1994a). Progress report January 1994. Recovery of Pultenaea trichophylla. Athelstone, South Australia: Black Hill Flora Centre.

Jusaitis, M. & B. Sorensen (1994c). Progress report August 1994. Recovery of Pultenaea trichophylla. Athelstone, South Australia: Black Hill Flora Centre.

Jusaitis, M. & B. Sorensen (1994d). Interim progress report December 1994. Pultenaea trichophylla. Athelstone, South Australia: Black Hill Flora Centre.

Jusaitis, M. & B. Sorensen (1995a). Progress report March 1995. Pultenaea trichophylla. Athelstone, South Australia: Black Hill Flora Centre.

Jusaitis, M. & B. Sorensen (1995b). Recovery Plan. Pultenaea trichophylla. Annual report September 1995. Athelstone, South Australia: Black Hill Flora Centre.

Jusaitis, M. & B. Sorensen (1996). Progress report August 1996. Pultenaea trichophylla. Athelstone, South Australia: Black Hill Flora Centre.

Jusaitis, M. & B. Sorensen (1997a). Recovery plan Pultenaea trichophylla Annual report. January 1997. Athelstone, South Australia: Black Hill Flora Centre.

Jusaitis, M. & B. Sorensen (1997b). Progress report August 1997. Pultenaea trichophylla. Athelstone, South Australia: Black Hill Flora Centre.

Jusaitis, M. & K. Smith (1998). Pultenaea trichophylla recovery plan annual report, 1998. Adelaide, South Australia: Department for Environment, Heritage and Aboriginal Affairs.

Kok, R.P.J. de & J.G. West (2003). A revision of Pultenaea (Fabaceae) 2. Eastern Australian species with velutinous ovaries and incurved leaves. Australian Systematic Botany. 16 (2):229-273. [Online]. CSIRO Australia. Available from: http://www.publish.csiro.au/?act=view_file&file_id=SB01019.pdf.

Pobke, K. (2007). Draft recovery plan for 23 threatened flora taxa on Eyre Peninsula, South Australia 2007-2012. [Online]. South Australia: Department for Environment and Heritage. Available from: http://www.environment.sa.gov.au/biodiversity/west_bcp/pdfs/draft_recovery_plan_for23.pdf..

South Australia Department for Environment and Heritage (SA DEH) (2005a). SA DEH databases comprising of the Opportune Database, Plant Population Database, Reserves Database, Roadside Vegetation Database and Survey Database. Adelaide, South Australia: Department of Environment and Heritage.

South Australian Department for Environment and Heritage (SA DEH) (2002a). Biodiversity Plan for Eyre Peninsula. [Online]. Adelaide, South Australia: Department for Environment and Heritage. Available from: http://www.environment.sa.gov.au/biodiversity/bioplans.html.

South Australian Department for Environment and Heritage (SA DEH) (no date). Phytophthora cinnamomi causing dieback in plants. Spread the word - not Phytophthora.

Threatened Species Scientific Committee (TSSC) (2009bs). Commonwealth Listing Advice on Pultenaea trichophylla (Tufted Bush-pea). [Online]. Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts. Canberra, ACT: Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts. Available from: http://www.environment.gov.au/biodiversity/threatened/species/pubs/12715-listing-advice.pdf.

Threatened Species Scientific Committee (TSSC) (2009bx). Commonwealth Conservation Advice on Pultenaea trichophylla (Tufted Bush-pea). [Online]. Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts. Canberra, ACT: Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts. Available from: http://www.environment.gov.au/biodiversity/threatened/species/pubs/12715-conservation-advice.pdf.

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This database is designed to provide statutory, biological and ecological information on species and ecological communities, migratory species, marine species, and species and species products subject to international trade and commercial use protected under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (the EPBC Act). It has been compiled from a range of sources including listing advice, recovery plans, published literature and individual experts. While reasonable efforts have been made to ensure the accuracy of the information, no guarantee is given, nor responsibility taken, by the Commonwealth for its accuracy, currency or completeness. The Commonwealth does not accept any responsibility for any loss or damage that may be occasioned directly or indirectly through the use of, or reliance on, the information contained in this database. The information contained in this database does not necessarily represent the views of the Commonwealth. This database is not intended to be a complete source of information on the matters it deals with. Individuals and organisations should consider all the available information, including that available from other sources, in deciding whether there is a need to make a referral or apply for a permit or exemption under the EPBC Act.

Citation: Department of the Environment (2014). Pultenaea trichophylla in Species Profile and Threats Database, Department of the Environment, Canberra. Available from: http://www.environment.gov.au/sprat. Accessed Fri, 22 Aug 2014 22:10:59 +1000.