Biodiversity

Species Profile and Threats Database


For information to assist proponents in referral, environmental assessments and compliance issues, refer to the Policy Statements and Guidelines (where available), the Conservation Advice (where available) or the Listing Advice (where available).
 
In addition, proponents and land managers should refer to the Recovery Plan (where available) or the Conservation Advice (where available) for recovery, mitigation and conservation information.

EPBC Act Listing Status Listed as Vulnerable
Listing and Conservation Advices Commonwealth Conservation Advice on Pomaderris pallida (Threatened Species Scientific Committee, 2008te) [Conservation Advice].
 
Recovery Plan Decision Recovery Plan not required, included on the Not Commenced List (1/11/2009).
 
Adopted/Made Recovery Plans
Federal Register of
    Legislative Instruments
Declaration under s178, s181, and s183 of the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 - List of threatened species, List of threatened ecological communities and List of threatening processes (Commonwealth of Australia, 2000) [Legislative Instrument].
 
State Government
    Documents and Websites
NSW:Pale Pomaderris - profile (NSW Department of Environment, Climate Change and Water (NSW DECCW), 2005jp) [Internet].
State Listing Status
NSW: Listed as Vulnerable (Threatened Species Conservation Act 1995 (New South Wales): December 2013)
Scientific name Pomaderris pallida [13684]
Family Rhamnaceae:Rhamnales:Magnoliopsida:Magnoliophyta:Plantae
Species author Wakef.
Infraspecies author  
Reference The Victorian Naturalist 68 (9 Dec. 1951) 141. (NB. Text runs from p. 140 to p. 142, then p. 141, and p. 143). (NB. Description cont. on p. 143).
Distribution map Species Distribution Map

This is an indicative distribution map of the present distribution of the species based on best available knowledge. See map caveat for more information.

Illustrations Google Images

Pomaderris pallida (Pale Pomaderris) is a compact, rounded perennial shrub, growing to 1.5 m high. The species has narrow or elliptical leaves, up to 20 mm long and 6 mm wide (Harden 2000 cited in TSSC 2008te).  The upper and lower surfaces of the leaves are covered in velvety, star-shaped hairs, which are visible under magnification (TSSC 2008te). The leaf surfaces are dark green (upper) and pale grey-white (lower) (TSSC 2008te). The flowers are cream or pale yellow (Briggs & Leigh 1985; Harden 1990; Garnett & Hyndes 1992). The fruit is a small, three-chambered, hairy capsule (Harden 2000 cited in TSSC 2008te).

The Pale Pomaderris is currently known from the ACT, southern NSW and eastern Victoria. In the ACT, this species is scattered along the Cotter, Paddys and Murrumbidgee Rivers and through the Molonglo Gorge (Briggs & Leigh 1985; Harden 1990; Garnett & Hyndes 1992; NSW NPWS 2000, pers. comm.). In NSW, the species is known to occur along the Murrumbidgee, in Tinderry Nature Reserve, along the Queanbeyan River, Kydra Trig and the Shoalhaven River. A population that was historically recorded in Kosciusko National Park has not been relocated for many years (Moore 2005 cited in TSSC 2008te). In Victoria, the species occurs in the North East and East Gippsland Natural Resource Management regions.

Plants propagated from cuttings collected near Kambah Pool, ACT, are established at the Australian National Botanic Gardens, Canberra (Briggs & Leigh 1985; Meredith & Richardson 1990).

In 1983-4, detailed searches were conducted in areas of suitable habitat along the lower reaches of Paddys River (NSW) and along the Murrumbidgee River, from Kambah Pool (ACT) to a few kilometres north of Ginninderra Falls (NSW). There does not appear to be suitable habitat upriver from the known sites on the Murrumbidgee River, until at least Tharwa (Walker 1997).

Willis (pers. comm. in Briggs & Leigh 1985) reported that the vegetation along the Ingeegoodbee River (Victoria) remained relatively undisturbed and, providing the original identification was correct, the species should still survive at the site.

The Pale Pomaderris is known from 15 locations throughout the species’ range (as of 2008) (TSSC 2008te). The details of 11 locations identified prior to 1985 are shown in the table below (Briggs and Leigh 1985).

Location Number Location details Plants present (1985) Tenure
1 0.9 km downstream from the Kambah Pool car park - 45 m² of steep slopes above the eastern bank of the Murrumbidgee River. 520-530 m above sea level (asl). 50 Crown Land
2 2 km downstream from the Kambah Pool lower car park and 300 m upstream from New Station Creek - 0.5 ha of steep slopes along the east side of the Murrumbidgee River valley. 530-550 m asl. 200-300 Crown Land
3 2.2 km downstream from Kambah Pool lower car park and 100 m upstream from New Station Creek - on the upper brow of the ridge overlooking the east bank of the Murrumbidgee River. Also on the north river bank at the junction of New Station Creek and the Murrumbidgee River. 60 Crown Land
4 1.5 km upstream from the junction of Murrumbidgee River and Cotter River - 1 ha along the top and upper slopes of the east bank of the Murrumbidgee River valley. 510-530 m asl. 200-300 Crown Land
5 150 m north-east of the second weir, downstream of the junction of the Murrumbidgee River and Cotter River - 150 m section of cliff. 500-520 m asl. 60 Crown Land
6 500 m north of the second weir, downstream of the junction of the Murrumbidgee River and Cotter River - 150 m section of steep slope on the eastern side of the river. 500-540 m asl. 150-200 Crown Land
7 800 m downstream from the second weir, downstream of the junction of the Murrumbidgee River and Cotter River - 225 m2 area, 200 m east of the river and immediately north of a fenceline. 480-490 m asl. 10 Crown Land
8 1.5 km downstream from the second weir, downstream of the junction of the Murrumbidgee River and Cotter River - 80 m section of moderately steep valley side. 480-510 m asl. 50 Crown Land
9 2.2 km south east from the junction of Paddys River and the Cotter River - 0.25 ha area on an upper slope of a gully on the east side of Paddys River. 580-600 m asl. 100 Crown Land
10 2.5 km south east from the junction of Paddys River and the Cotter River - 1 ha of lower slopes of a valley side. 500-530 m asl. 100 Crown Land
11 1.4 km south east from the junction of Paddys River and the Cotter River - very steep hillside on the east bank of Paddys River. 500 m asl. 1 Crown Land

It has been noted that suitable habitat extends further beyond the locations where the Pale Pomaderris has been recorded. There was a report of a large population in a nature park in Canberra, leading to the suggestion that the species may not be as rare as once thought (Walker 1997).

The species is conserved in Namadgi National Park (NP), Bullen Range Nature Reserve (NR) and Stony Creek NR (ACT) with less than 1000 individuals in each (Briggs & Leigh 1996). The species has previously been collected in Kosciusko NP, but its current status there is unknown (Briggs & Leigh (1990).

The Pale Pomaderris is found at numerous small sites along the plateau edge and very steep upper slopes and cliffs of river valleys (Briggs & Leigh 1985; Garnett & Hyndes 1992) at 480-600 m above sea level. The ACT sites are only on the eastern banks of the rivers, with an aspect ranging from north-westerly through westerly to southerly. The soils are shallow, pale brown sandy loams over granite rock and large, exposed granite boulders may be present. The species grows in near-monospecific stands in shrubland, surrounded by Eucalyptus or Callitris woodland, or in open forest (Briggs & Leigh 1985; Harden 1990). The shrubland is commonly dominated by Bursaria spinosa (Blackthorn/Boxthorn), Grevillea juniperina (Juniper Grevillea), Acacia rubida (Red-stemmed Wattle) and Kunzea ericoides (formerly Leptospermum phylicoides) (Burgan) (Briggs & Leigh 1985). Details on the habitat of each of the eleven populations surveyed by Briggs & Leigh (1985):

Location Number Habitat association
1 Soil is shallow, pale-brown, gravelly loam overlying decomposed granite. There are large exposed granite outcrops and boulders present. The species grows in an almost monospecific stand, in a relatively open area on the edge of open forest dominated by Eucalyptus macrorhyncha (Red Stringybark) with scattered E. polyanthemos (Red Box). There is a moderately dense understorey of Grevillea juniperina (Juniper Wattle), Bursaria spinosa (Boxthorn), Correa reflexa (Native Fuchsia), Cassinia aculeata (Dolly Bush), Acacia rubida (Red-stemmed Wattle), Lomandra longifolia (Spiny-headed Mat Rush), Hardenbergia violacea (False Sarsparilla) and a Poa sp. There are small numbers of Discaria pubescens (Hairy Anchor Plant).
2 Soil is shallow, yellow-brown, gravelly loam overlying decomposing granite. The species is co-dominant with Grevillea juniperina (Juniper Wattle) and Bursaria spinosa (Boxthorn) in a shrub community that also supports scattered Acacia rubida (Red-stemmed Wattle), Hibbertia sp. and Poa sp. The plateau surrounding these two populations was once Eucalypt woodland. Pasture abuts the population.
3 The habitat is similar to location 2.
4 The soil is dark brown, gravelly loam amongst large granite boulders. They have a predominantly western aspect, but from north-west/south-east. The species grows in a shrub community surrounded by Eucalyptus mannifera on the plateau and Pomaderris angustifolia (Narrow-leaf Pomaderris) and Kunzea ericoides (Burgan) on the lower granite slopes. All the understorey shrubs at the site near Kambah were present along with two additional species Dodonaea angustissima (Narrow-leaved Hopbush) and Parahebe perfoliata. A few plants of the rare Discaria pubescens (Hairy Anchor Plant) were found.
5 Soil is shallow pale brown, gravelly loam amongst exposed granite boulders. The vegetation is Eucalyptus mannifera (Brittle Gum) and E. macrorhyncha (Red Stringybark) woodland with a sparse shrub understorey including Bursaria spinosa (Boxthorn), Grevillea juniperina (Juniper Grevillea) and Pomaderris angustifola (Narrow-leaf Pomaderris).
6 Soil is brown, gravelly loam overlying granite. Vegetation is similar to that of location 5.
7 The soil is red clay loam over rock. Vegetation is Eucalyptus polyanthemos (Red Box) and Callitris endlicheri (Black Cypress Pine) woodland with virtually no understorey.
8 Soil is skeletal, brown, sandy loam overlying decomposed granite. Vegetation is Callitris endlicheri (Black Cypress Pine), Eucalyptus mannifera (Brittle Gum) and E. macrorhyncha (Red Stringybark)open woodland, with a shrubby understorey, including Pomaderris angustifolia (Narrow-leaf Pomaderris), Leptospermum sp., Bursaria spinosa (Boxthorn), Grevillea juniperina (Juniper Grevillea), Acacia rubida (Red-stemmed Wattle), Cryptandra amara (Bitter Cryptandra), Glycine clandestina, Monotoca sp. and Haloragis sp.
9 The soil is dark brown, sandy loam over broken quartzite and granite. The vegetation is Eucalyptus bridgesiana (Apple Box) and E. mannifera (Brittle Gum) woodland with an understorey including Bursaria spinosa (Boxthorn), Indigofera australis (Australian Indigo), Glycine clandestina, Senecio sp. and various sedges and grasses.
10 The soil is a dark brown sandy loam over granite. Vegetation is Eucalyptus melliodora (Yellow Box) and Casuarina cunninghamiana (River Oak) woodland, with a shrub understorey including Bursaria spinosa (Boxthorn), Acacia dealbata (Silver Wattle), Kunzea ericoides (Burgan) and a Poa sp.
11 Habitat is similar to location 9.

Flowers are borne from mid September to early December (Briggs & Leigh 1985; Garnett & Hyndes 1992).

The main threats identified for Pomaderris pallida are rural residential development, competition from weeds (particularly the Blackberry – Rubus sp.), grazing by feral goats (Capra hircus), inappropriate fire regimes, fragmentation, and loss of remnant habitat (TSSC 2008te). Location two is experiencing a weed threat, in the form of a Pinus radiata invasion (Briggs & Leigh 1985; Garnett & Hyndes 1992). Location-specific threats are provided in the following table, locations not included in this table are under no immediate threat (Briggs & Leigh 1985):

Location Number Threats
2 All the existing population is within unleased river corridor and seems safe from further clearing. The most serious threat is the potential of invasion by Pinus radiata, as scattered plants already exist within the population.
4 The site does not appear to be under threat, but adjacent leasehold land is not fenced off from the river corridor.
9 Inappropriate fire regime.
10 Inappropriate fire regime.
11 Inappropriate fire regime.

Documents relevant to the management of Pomaderris pallida can be found at the start of the profile.

The following table lists known and perceived threats to this species. Threats are based on the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN) threat classification version 1.1.

Threat Class Threatening Species References
Ecosystem/Community Stresses:Indirect Ecosystem Effects:Loss and/or fragmentation of habitat and/or subpopulations Commonwealth Conservation Advice on Pomaderris pallida (Threatened Species Scientific Committee, 2008te) [Conservation Advice].
Ecosystem/Community Stresses:Indirect Ecosystem Effects:Restricted geographical distribution (area of occupancy and extent of occurrence) Pomaderris pallida in Species Profile and Threats (SPRAT) database (Department of the Environment and Heritage (DEH), 2006rx) [Internet].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive Non-Native/Alien Species:Competition and/or habitat degradation Pinus radiata (Radiata Pine Monterey Pine, Insignis Pine, Wilding Pine) Pomaderris pallida in Species Profile and Threats (SPRAT) database (Department of the Environment and Heritage (DEH), 2006rx) [Internet].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive Non-Native/Alien Species:Competition and/or habitat degradation Rubus fruticosus aggregate (Blackberry, European Blackberry) Commonwealth Conservation Advice on Pomaderris pallida (Threatened Species Scientific Committee, 2008te) [Conservation Advice].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive Non-Native/Alien Species:Grazing, tramping, competition and/or habitat degradation Capra hircus (Goat) Commonwealth Conservation Advice on Pomaderris pallida (Threatened Species Scientific Committee, 2008te) [Conservation Advice].
Natural System Modifications:Fire and Fire Suppression:Inappropriate and/or changed fire regimes (frequency, timing, intensity) Pomaderris pallida in Species Profile and Threats (SPRAT) database (Department of the Environment and Heritage (DEH), 2006rx) [Internet].
Residential and Commercial Development:Residential and Commercial Development:Habitat modification (clearance and degradation) due to urban development Commonwealth Conservation Advice on Pomaderris pallida (Threatened Species Scientific Committee, 2008te) [Conservation Advice].
Species Stresses:Species Stresses:unspecified Commonwealth Conservation Advice on Pomaderris pallida (Threatened Species Scientific Committee, 2008te) [Conservation Advice].

Briggs, J.D. & J.H. Leigh (1985). Delineation of Important Habitats of Rare and Threatened Plant Species in the Australian Capital Territory. Canberra: CSIRO.

Briggs, J.D. & J.H. Leigh (1990). Delineation of Important Habitats of Threatened Plant Species in South-Eastern New South Wales. Canberra: Australian Heritage Commission.

Briggs, J.D. & J.H. Leigh (1996). Rare or Threatened Australian Plants - Revised Edition. Collingwood: CSIRO Publishing.

Garnett, R. & Hyndes, D. (1992). The Heritage of the Australian Capital Territory. Canberra: National Trust of Australia.

Harden, G.J. (ed) (1990). Flora of New South Wales. Volume One. Kensington, NSW: University of NSW Press.

Harden, G.J. (ed.) (2000). Flora of New South Wales, Volume One. Kensington, NSW: University of NSW Press.

Meredith, L.D. & M.M. Richardson (1990). Rare or Threatened Australian Plant Species in Cultivation in Australia. Report Series No. 15. Page(s) 1-114. Canberra: Australian National Parks and Wildlife Service.

NSW National Parks & Wildlife Service (NSW NPWS) (2000). Personal communication. Sydney: NSW NPWS.

Threatened Species Scientific Committee (2008te). Commonwealth Conservation Advice on Pomaderris pallida. [Online]. Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts. Available from: http://www.environment.gov.au/biodiversity/threatened/species/pubs/13684-conservation-advice.pdf.

Walker, J (1997). Rhamnaceae Study Group Newsletter.:3. Association of Societies for Growing Aust. Plants.

EPBC Act email updates can be received via the Communities for Communities newsletter and the EPBC Act newsletter.

This database is designed to provide statutory, biological and ecological information on species and ecological communities, migratory species, marine species, and species and species products subject to international trade and commercial use protected under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (the EPBC Act). It has been compiled from a range of sources including listing advice, recovery plans, published literature and individual experts. While reasonable efforts have been made to ensure the accuracy of the information, no guarantee is given, nor responsibility taken, by the Commonwealth for its accuracy, currency or completeness. The Commonwealth does not accept any responsibility for any loss or damage that may be occasioned directly or indirectly through the use of, or reliance on, the information contained in this database. The information contained in this database does not necessarily represent the views of the Commonwealth. This database is not intended to be a complete source of information on the matters it deals with. Individuals and organisations should consider all the available information, including that available from other sources, in deciding whether there is a need to make a referral or apply for a permit or exemption under the EPBC Act.

Citation: Department of the Environment (2014). Pomaderris pallida in Species Profile and Threats Database, Department of the Environment, Canberra. Available from: http://www.environment.gov.au/sprat. Accessed Fri, 18 Apr 2014 00:47:24 +1000.