Biodiversity

Species Profile and Threats Database


For information to assist proponents in referral, environmental assessments and compliance issues, refer to the Policy Statements and Guidelines (where available), the Conservation Advice (where available) or the Listing Advice (where available).
 
In addition, proponents and land managers should refer to the Recovery Plan (where available) or the Conservation Advice (where available) for recovery, mitigation and conservation information.

EPBC Act Listing Status Listed as Critically Endangered
Listing and Conservation Advices Commonwealth Listing Advice on Haloragis platycarpa (Threatened Species Scientific Committee, 2006cz) [Listing Advice].
 
Commonwealth Conservation Advice on Haloragis platycarpa (Threatened Species Scientific Committee, 2008yz) [Conservation Advice].
 
Recovery Plan Decision Recovery Plan required, included on the Commenced List (1/11/2009).
 
Adopted/Made Recovery Plans National recovery plan for the Broad-fruited Haloragis (Haloragis platycarpa) (Department of Environment and Conservation, 2009s) [Recovery Plan].
 
Other EPBC Act Plans Pinnate-leaved Eremophila (Eremophila pinnatifida ms) Interim Recovery Plan 2002-2007 (Stack, G. & A. Brown, 2002) [Recovery Plan].
 
Federal Register of
    Legislative Instruments
Declaration under s178, s181, and s183 of the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 - List of threatened species, List of threatened ecological communities and List of threatening processes (Commonwealth of Australia, 2000) [Legislative Instrument].
 
Inclusion of species in the list of threatened species under section 178 of the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (44) (14/8/2006) (Commonwealth of Australia, 2006h) [Legislative Instrument].
 
State Government
    Documents and Websites
WA:Threatened flora of the Western Central Wheatbelt (Collins, J., 2009) [State Species Management Plan].
State Listing Status
WA: Listed as Critically Endangered (Wildlife Conservation Act 1950 (Western Australia): September 2013 list)
Scientific name Haloragis platycarpa [15371]
Family Haloragaceae:Haloragales:Magnoliopsida:Magnoliophyta:Plantae
Species author Benth.
Infraspecies author  
Reference Flora Australiensis 2 (5 Oct. 1864) 478.
Distribution map Species Distribution Map

This is an indicative distribution map of the present distribution of the species based on best available knowledge. See map caveat for more information.

Illustrations Google Images

Scientific name: Haloragis platycarpa (Benth 1864).

Common name: Broad-fruited Haloragis (Brown et al. 1998).

The Broad-fruited Haloragis is a short-lived herb that grows to 30 cm tall. It has many branches and is hairless, apart from some single-celled transparent hairs. Stalkless leaves up to 45 mm long are arranged alternately along the stem. The leaves are lanceolate (tapering from the base), with several large teeth towards the apex. Groups of one to three flowers are held in the upper axils, but only the central flower is functional. Each flower has four petals, up to 2 mm long, 8 stamens and four styles. The single fruit that develops in each axil is up to 2.5 mm long, and has a swollen, spongy covering. It has four compartments, four weak ribs, and is densely covered with minute, rounded projections (Brown et al. 1998; CALM 2005).

The Broad-fruited Haloragis is known to occur in a single population near Dalwallinu, 220 km north-east of Perth in the West Australian wheatbelt (CALM 2005).

The total extent of occurrence for this species is approximately 0.584 km² (CALM 2005).

The total area of occupancy for this species is approximately 0.584 km² (CALM 2005).

The Department of Conservation and Land Management's Regional Herbaria Consultant rediscovered the Broad-fruited Haloragis following advice from local plant enthusiasts. The species was confirmed from the Dalwallinu Town Reserve but not seen at any other location. Local plant enthusiasts have not found or collected this plant from any other site in the District (CALM 2005).

The Broad-fruited Haloragis was not located/collected during flora surveys in the early 1990s in association with the preparation of Wildlife Management Program No. 9, Declared Rare Flora and Other Plants in Need of Special Protection in the Merredin District (Mollemans et al. 1993).

Prior to the rediscovery, ongoing plant surveys had been untaken by Departmental staff from the CALM Merredin District in the Dalwallinu area, but this species has not been recorded at any other site (CALM 2005).

The population of the Broad-fruited Haloragis was 20-30 individuals when the species was rediscovered in October 2000. The site was resurveyed in June 2001 but only 30 dead plants were recorded. The site was surveyed again in 2003 and 2004 but no plants were recorded during these surveys (CALM 2005).

WATSCU staff have indicated that this species is likely to be an annual which dies annually and reappears in winter/spring from soil stored seed. Therefore, the disappearance of the only recorded plants in 2001 may be part of an annual cycle making it difficult to predict trends with only a few years survey data (CALM 2005).

The Broad-fruited Haloragis is found in low woodland, growing in flat, brown, dry loam soils (CALM 2005).

Species associated with the Broad-fruited Haloragis include Acacia acuminata, Grevillea levis, Pimelea avonensis and numerous grasses both native and introduced (CALM 2005; WA Herbarium 2005).

The Pinnate-leaf Eremophila (Eremophila pinnatifida), listed as Critically Endangered under the EPBC Act, occurs on the same land parcel as the only known population of the Broad-fruited Haloragis. An Interim Recovery Plan has been prepared for E. pinnatifida (Stack & Brown 2002) and recovery actions for this species may also assist in the recovery of the Broad-fruited Haloragis (CALM 2005).

This species is easily recognisable by its distinctive fruit, which is shaped like a depressed globe (Brown et al. 1998).

Surveying late in the flowering season may be most effective as the Broad-fruited Haloragis' distinct fruit is easy to detect. However, the exact flowering season is unknown and monitoring of the known population is required to clarify this (CALM 2005).

A factor contributing to a decline in the quality of habitat and potentially the population size of the Broad-fruited Haloragis is weed invasion. Severe weed invasion is likely to critically reduce the population health and reproductive vigour of the Broad-fruited Haloragis (CALM 2005). Although this species was recorded from a weedy area of a shire reserve, so little is known about this species it is difficult to know what factors may be required to stimulate regeneration in this species. Weeds may be a factor in the long-term. The dry seasons that Western Australia have been experiencing since 2000 has resulted in fewer weeds in the area (CALM 2005).

It is believed that the Broad-fruited Haloragis appears following disturbance events such as soil disturbance, fire or heavy rain. The year that the species was rediscovered, another threatened species under the EPBC Act, Eremophila pinnatifida, appeared also from soil-stored seed, although no further seedlings have appeared since. It is suspected that both it and the Broad-fruited Haloragis germinated following heavy summer rainfall that year (CALM 2005).

The area in which the species was found has not been burnt for an extended period of time and it is unclear whether fire would destroy the population or stimulate the germination of seed (CALM 2005).

Winter drought conditions may have had a severe effect on the Broad-fruited Haloragis as no recruitment was observed (CALM 2005).

The local shire, who manages the land on which the only known population of the Broad-fruited Haloragis occurs, have been notified and advised of their legislative responsibility to protect the plants. Legislative protection under the Wildlife Conservation Act (1950) and clearing provisions under Western Australia's Environmental Protection Act (1986) provide legal protection from clearing and other human physical disturbances to the plants and population site (CALM 2005).

Proposed recovery actions for the Broad-fruited Haloragis (CALM 2005) include:

  • Further survey to try and locate plants in current population and additional populations;
  • Germplasm collection if adequate seed material is available;
  • Negotiations with the Shire to manage the shire reserve for the conservation of this species;
  • Weed control; and
  • Biological research to gain an understanding of the ecology of this species.

This species was first described by Benthem (1864).

The following table lists known and perceived threats to this species. Threats are based on the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN) threat classification version 1.1.

Threat Class Threatening Species References
Climate Change and Severe Weather:Droughts:Drought Commonwealth Conservation Advice on Haloragis platycarpa (Threatened Species Scientific Committee, 2008yz) [Conservation Advice].
Climate Change and Severe Weather:Storms and Flooding:Storm damage Commonwealth Conservation Advice on Haloragis platycarpa (Threatened Species Scientific Committee, 2008yz) [Conservation Advice].
Ecosystem/Community Stresses:Indirect Ecosystem Effects:Restricted geographical distribution (area of occupancy and extent of occurrence) Commonwealth Listing Advice on Haloragis platycarpa (Threatened Species Scientific Committee, 2006cz) [Listing Advice].
Human Intrusions and Disturbance:Human Intrusions and Disturbance:Human induced disturbance due to unspecified activities Commonwealth Conservation Advice on Haloragis platycarpa (Threatened Species Scientific Committee, 2008yz) [Conservation Advice].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive Non-Native/Alien Species:Competition and/or habitat degradation by weeds Commonwealth Conservation Advice on Haloragis platycarpa (Threatened Species Scientific Committee, 2008yz) [Conservation Advice].
Natural System Modifications:Fire and Fire Suppression:Inappropriate and/or changed fire regimes (frequency, timing, intensity) National recovery plan for the Broad-fruited Haloragis (Haloragis platycarpa) (Department of Environment and Conservation, 2009s) [Recovery Plan].
Commonwealth Conservation Advice on Haloragis platycarpa (Threatened Species Scientific Committee, 2008yz) [Conservation Advice].
Species Stresses:Indirect Species Effects:Low numbers of individuals Commonwealth Listing Advice on Haloragis platycarpa (Threatened Species Scientific Committee, 2006cz) [Listing Advice].
Species Stresses:Indirect Species Effects:Poor recruitment (regeneration) and declining population numbers National recovery plan for the Broad-fruited Haloragis (Haloragis platycarpa) (Department of Environment and Conservation, 2009s) [Recovery Plan].
Species Stresses:Indirect Species Effects:no known population National recovery plan for the Broad-fruited Haloragis (Haloragis platycarpa) (Department of Environment and Conservation, 2009s) [Recovery Plan].
Uncategorised:Uncategorised:threats not specified Commonwealth Conservation Advice on Haloragis platycarpa (Threatened Species Scientific Committee, 2008yz) [Conservation Advice].

Benthem (1864). Flora Australiensis.:478.

Brown, A., C. Thomson-Dans & N. Marchant, eds. (1998). Western Australia's Threatened Flora. Como, Western Australia: Department of Conservation and Land Management.

CALM (2004). Draft Policy Statement No 9. Conserving Threatened Species and Ecological Communities (Revised). Western Australian Department of Conservation and Land Management.

Department of Environment and Conservation (2009s). National recovery plan for the Broad-fruited Haloragis (Haloragis platycarpa). [Online]. Western Australia: Department of Environment and Conservation. Available from: http://www.environment.gov.au/biodiversity/threatened/publications/recovery/haloragis-platycarpa.html.

Mollemans, F.H., P.H. Brown & D.J. Coates (1993). Declared rare flora and other plants in need of special protection in the Merredin District (excluding the Wongan-Ballidu Shire). Western Australia Department of Conservation and Land Management.

Stack, G. & A. Brown (2002). Pinnate-leaved Eremophila (Eremophila pinnatifida ms) Interim Recovery Plan 2002-2007. [Online]. Available from: http://www.environment.gov.au/biodiversity/threatened/publications/recovery/e-pinnatifida/index.html.

Western Australian Department of Conservation and Land Management (WA CALM) (2005). Records held in CALM's Declared Flora Database and Rare flora files. Perth, Western Australia: WA CALM.

Western Australian Herbarium (2005). FloraBase - The Western Australian Flora. [Online]. Perth, Western Australia: Department of Conservation and Land Management. Available from: http://florabase.calm.wa.gov.au/.

EPBC Act email updates can be received via the Communities for Communities newsletter and the EPBC Act newsletter.

This database is designed to provide statutory, biological and ecological information on species and ecological communities, migratory species, marine species, and species and species products subject to international trade and commercial use protected under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (the EPBC Act). It has been compiled from a range of sources including listing advice, recovery plans, published literature and individual experts. While reasonable efforts have been made to ensure the accuracy of the information, no guarantee is given, nor responsibility taken, by the Commonwealth for its accuracy, currency or completeness. The Commonwealth does not accept any responsibility for any loss or damage that may be occasioned directly or indirectly through the use of, or reliance on, the information contained in this database. The information contained in this database does not necessarily represent the views of the Commonwealth. This database is not intended to be a complete source of information on the matters it deals with. Individuals and organisations should consider all the available information, including that available from other sources, in deciding whether there is a need to make a referral or apply for a permit or exemption under the EPBC Act.

Citation: Department of the Environment (2014). Haloragis platycarpa in Species Profile and Threats Database, Department of the Environment, Canberra. Available from: http://www.environment.gov.au/sprat. Accessed Fri, 25 Jul 2014 22:01:52 +1000.