Biodiversity

Species Profile and Threats Database


For information to assist proponents in referral, environmental assessments and compliance issues, refer to the Policy Statements and Guidelines (where available), the Conservation Advice (where available) or the Listing Advice (where available).
 
In addition, proponents and land managers should refer to the Recovery Plan (where available) or the Conservation Advice (where available) for recovery, mitigation and conservation information.

EPBC Act Listing Status Listed as Endangered
Recovery Plan Decision Recovery Plan required, included on the Commenced List (1/11/2009).
 
Adopted/Made Recovery Plans Recovery plan for nationally threatened plant species on Kangaroo Island South Australia (Taylor, D.A., 2012) [Recovery Plan].
 
Federal Register of
    Legislative Instruments
Declaration under s178, s181, and s183 of the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 - List of threatened species, List of threatened ecological communities and List of threatening processes (Commonwealth of Australia, 2000) [Legislative Instrument].
 
State Government
    Documents and Websites
SA:Threatened Flora of South Australia Fact Sheet - Threatened Flora on Kangaroo Island. Endangered Small flower Daisy-bush Olearia microdisca (South Australian Department for Environment and Heritage (SA DEH), 2010j) [Information Sheet].
SA:Draft Recovery Plan for 15 Nationally Threatened Plant Species, Kangaroo Island, South Australia, second edition 2003-2013 (Taylor, D.A., 2008) [State Recovery Plan].
State Listing Status
SA: Listed as Endangered (National Parks and Wildlife Act 1972 (South Australia): June 2011 list)
Scientific name Olearia microdisca [21465]
Family Asteraceae:Asterales:Magnoliopsida:Magnoliophyta:Plantae
Species author J.Black
Infraspecies author  
Reference Transactions and Proceedings of the Royal Society of South Australia 52 (24 Dec. 1928) 229.
Distribution map Species Distribution Map

This is an indicative distribution map of the present distribution of the species based on best available knowledge. See map caveat for more information.

Illustrations Google Images

Scientific name: Olearia microdisca

Common name: Small-flowered Daisy-bush

The Small-flowered Daisy-bush is a compact shrub growing up to 2 m high. Flower heads are white with a yellow centre (Cooke 1986b).

Current Distribution

The Small-flowered Daisy-bush is endemic to north-east Kangaroo Island on the flood plains surrounding the Cygnet River, Nepean Bay and the plateau between MacGillivray Hill and America River Inlet (Davies 1986; Jessop & Toelken 1986; Taylor 2008). The species also persists on slopes and plateau sites within 5 km either side of Hog Bay road, between Nepean Bay and the junction with Three Chain road (Taylor 2008).

The species has a current estimated area of occupancy of 26.1 km2 (Taylor 2008).

Past Distribution

The distribution of the Small-flowered Daisy-bush at the time of European settlement was not documented, however, it is likely to have included large areas of now cleared habitat in east Kangaroo Island (Taylor 2008). 2003 surveys of previously known locations, that dated as far back as 1983, indicated that the species had declined or disappeared at several sites (Taylor 2003).

The Small-flowered Daisy-bush is known to occur in several areas of remnant vegetation, including roadside reserves and private property (Davies 1986; Taylor 2008). Based on an assessment of data and published surveys dating back to 1986, Taylor (2008) identified the current, important, known sub-populations of the species as:

Sub-population

Location

Abundance

Area of occupancy (km2)

A

Hog Bay Road, Wilsons Road and Beyeria Conservation Park

1002

7.5

B

Airport and Gum Creek Road

637

7.6

C

American River Road

510 

1.3 

D

Hog Bay Road

91

2.1 

E

Hog Bay Road and Hundred Line Road

16

5.7

F

Playford Highway

7

1.0 

G

Playford Highway

1

0.9

TOTAL

 

2264

26.1

The Small-flowered Daisy-bush generally occurs on floodplains, with the highest concentration of plants found along creek banks and surrounding gilgais (small depressions) subject to seasonal waterlogging (Davies 1986; Jusaitis 1993). The soils are usually a fine sandy loam or lateritic heavy clay. However, smaller populations have been found in better drained sites in sandy soil on the gentle, north-facing slopes of hilly uplands.

Away from creeklines the Small-flowered Daisy-bush is observed in open mallee shrubland to woodland dominated by Eucalyptus cneorifolia, Melaleuca uncinata, M. gibbosa, Dodonaea baueri, Grevillea ilicifolia, Lasiopetalum baueri, Eutaxia microphylla and Lepidosperma viscidum. Along creeklines it occurs in Eucalyptus cosmophylla low open-woodland and in Melaleuca gibbosa tall shrubland and open-scrub (Taylor 2008).

The Small-flowered Daisy-bush flowers mainly between October and February, although flowering and fruiting has been observed in May and June (Davies 1986). The species germinates following disturbance and all large populations observed occur in vegetation which is regenerating after disturbance. Very few individuals were observed in 'climax' vegetation, and none of these were seedlings (Davies 1986; Jusaitis 1993).

Populations are, however, threatened by frequent disturbance or grazing which does not allow plants to replenish the soil seed bank. A population of O. microdisca burnt in 1985 and thought to have become extinct was found to have regenerated, four years after the fire. The interval between germination and seed production is thought to be at least four years (Davies 1986; Jusaitis 1993).

Threats to the Small-flowered Daisy-bush include land clearance, stock grazing, weed invasion, road maintenance activities, increasing salinity of creeks and damage caused by kangaroos (Macropus spp.) (Jusaitis 1993). The inability of plants to regenerate following loss of apical meristems usually results in the death of the plant.

The Threatened Plant Action Group (SA) received $40 000 of funding, through the Threatened Species Network Community Grants in 2001-02, part of which was for the development of an interim recovery plan for the species, an assessment of its status and threats prioritising on-ground recovery works and direct future recovery efforts, and the development of partnerships to carry out weed control, seed collection, planting and site protection.

The Nature Conservation Society of South Australia Inc received $21 980 of funding through the Threatened Species Network Community Grants in 2003-04, part of which was for the implementation of actions under a Threatened Species Network draft recovery plan in three areas critical to plant recovery - grazing management, weed management, community awareness and involvement.

Documents relevant to the management of the Small-flowered Daisy-bush can be found at the start of the profile.

The following table lists known and perceived threats to this species. Threats are based on the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN) threat classification version 1.1.

Threat Class Threatening Species References
Agriculture and Aquaculture:Agriculture and Aquaculture:Land clearing, habitat fragmentation and/or habitat degradation Olearia microdisca in Species Profile and Threats (SPRAT) database (Department of the Environment and Heritage, 2006rt) [Internet].
Agriculture and Aquaculture:Livestock Farming and Grazing:Grazing pressures and associated habitat changes Olearia microdisca in Species Profile and Threats (SPRAT) database (Department of the Environment and Heritage, 2006rt) [Internet].
Human Intrusions and Disturbance:Human Intrusions and Disturbance:Mechanical disturbance during construction, maintanance or recreational activities Olearia microdisca in Species Profile and Threats (SPRAT) database (Department of the Environment and Heritage, 2006rt) [Internet].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive Non-Native/Alien Species:Competition and/or habitat degradation by weeds Olearia microdisca in Species Profile and Threats (SPRAT) database (Department of the Environment and Heritage, 2006rt) [Internet].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive Non-Native/Alien Species:Vegetation and habitat loss caused by dieback Phytophthora cinnamomi Threat abatement plan for disease in natural ecosystems caused by Phytophthora cinnamomi (Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts (DEWHA), 2009w) [Threat Abatement Plan].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Problematic Native Species:Competition, predation and/or habitat degradation by kangaroos and wallabies Olearia microdisca in Species Profile and Threats (SPRAT) database (Department of the Environment and Heritage, 2006rt) [Internet].
Natural System Modifications:Dams and Water Management/Use:Salinity Olearia microdisca in Species Profile and Threats (SPRAT) database (Department of the Environment and Heritage, 2006rt) [Internet].

Cooke, D.A. (1986). Compositae (Asteraceae). In: Jessop, J.P. & H.R. Toelken, eds. Flora of South Australia, Part III: Polemoniaceae-Compositae. 4th Edition. Adelaide: South Australian Government Printing Division.

Davies, R.J.P. (1986). Threatened Plant Species of the Mt Lofty Ranges and Kangaroo Island Regions of South Australia. Conservation Council of South Australia.

Jessop, J.P. & H.R. Toelken, eds. (1986). Flora of South Australia. Adelaide, South Australia: SA Government Printing Division.

Jusaitis, M. (1993). Conservation Studies on four endangered plants from Kangaroo Island, SA. Adelaide; SA DELM.

Taylor D. (2003). Profile of 15 nationally threatened plants on Kangaroo Island. Report to the Department for Environment and Heritage. Kingscote, South Australia.

Taylor, D.A. (2008). Draft Recovery Plan for 15 Nationally Threatened Plant Species, Kangaroo Island, South Australia, second edition 2003-2013. [Online]. Department for Environment and Heritage, Government of South Australia. Available from: http://www.environment.sa.gov.au/Plants_Animals/Threatened_species_ecological_communities/Recovery_planning/Plans_for_threatened_plants_in_SA.

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This database is designed to provide statutory, biological and ecological information on species and ecological communities, migratory species, marine species, and species and species products subject to international trade and commercial use protected under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (the EPBC Act). It has been compiled from a range of sources including listing advice, recovery plans, published literature and individual experts. While reasonable efforts have been made to ensure the accuracy of the information, no guarantee is given, nor responsibility taken, by the Commonwealth for its accuracy, currency or completeness. The Commonwealth does not accept any responsibility for any loss or damage that may be occasioned directly or indirectly through the use of, or reliance on, the information contained in this database. The information contained in this database does not necessarily represent the views of the Commonwealth. This database is not intended to be a complete source of information on the matters it deals with. Individuals and organisations should consider all the available information, including that available from other sources, in deciding whether there is a need to make a referral or apply for a permit or exemption under the EPBC Act.

Citation: Department of the Environment (2014). Olearia microdisca in Species Profile and Threats Database, Department of the Environment, Canberra. Available from: http://www.environment.gov.au/sprat. Accessed Fri, 11 Jul 2014 19:33:17 +1000.