Biodiversity

Species Profile and Threats Database


For information to assist proponents in referral, environmental assessments and compliance issues, refer to the Policy Statements and Guidelines (where available), the Conservation Advice (where available) or the Listing Advice (where available).
 
In addition, proponents and land managers should refer to the Recovery Plan (where available) or the Conservation Advice (where available) for recovery, mitigation and conservation information.

EPBC Act Listing Status Listed as Vulnerable
Listing and Conservation Advices Commonwealth Conservation Advice on Zieria collina (Threatened Species Scientific Committee, 2008xi) [Conservation Advice].
 
Recovery Plan Decision Recovery Plan required, included on the Commenced List (1/11/2009).
 
Adopted/Made Recovery Plans Border Ranges Rainforest Biodiversity Management Plan - NSW & Queensland (NSW Department of Environment, Climate Change and Water (NSW DECCW), 2010o) [Recovery Plan].
 
Federal Register of
    Legislative Instruments
Declaration under s178, s181, and s183 of the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 - List of threatened species, List of threatened ecological communities and List of threatening processes (Commonwealth of Australia, 2000) [Legislative Instrument].
 
State Listing Status
QLD: Listed as Vulnerable (Nature Conservation Act 1992 (Queensland): July 2012)
Scientific name Zieria collina [2178]
Family Rutaceae:Sapindales:Magnoliopsida:Magnoliophyta:Plantae
Species author C.T.White
Infraspecies author  
Reference Proceedings of the Royal Society of Queensland 43 (7 Mar. 1932) 46.
Distribution map Species Distribution Map

This is an indicative distribution map of the present distribution of the species based on best available knowledge. See map caveat for more information.

Illustrations Google Images
http://www.brisrain.webcentral.com.au/corchorus/poster_species.pdf

Large spreading shrub to 3 m, with conspicuous white flowers (Armstrong 2002).

It is restricted to the environs of Tamborine Mountain in south-eastern Qld (Stanley & Ross 1983; Fitzsimmons 1999; Halford, D., pers. comm., 2001; Armstrong 2002), where it is known from four populations in national parks or nature reserves, eight populations on Commonwealth Defence Force land and five populations on either freehold land or unreserved public land. The species occurs within an area c. 15 km by 5 km (Fitzsimmons 1999; Halford, D. 2001, pers. comm.).

Forms thickets in light rainforest, and often a dominant shrub in regrowth (Stanley & Ross 1983).< Grows at an altitude of c. 550 m (Armstrong 2002).

Tamborine NP - Palm Grove section: grows as a spindly shrub in heavy chocolate cracking clay soils on the margin between tall open forest and rainforest with emergent hoop pine Araucaria cunninghamii (Fitzsimmons 1999; Armstrong 2002). Other associated species include Eucalyptus grandis, E. major, Lophostemon confertus and Flindersia australis (Armstrong 2002).

Tamborine NP - Cedar Ck section: grows in steep rock-strewn gullies on shallow gravelly soil amongst large trachyte boulders in open forest (Fitzsimmons 1999; Armstrong 2002). Associated species include Corymbia maculate, C. citriodora ssp. variegata, Eucalyptus propinqua, E. microcorys and Lophostemon confertus with understorey plants such as Brachychiton discolor, Cordyline stricta, Alphitonia excelsa and Hibbertia scandens (BRI undated; Fitzsimmons 1999; Armstrong 2002).

Tamborine NP - Knoll section: grows in basalt-derived, dark-red, clay loams on steep hillsides on the margin between tall open forest and closed forest. Associated species include Eucalyptus grandis, Lophostemon confertus, Euroschinus falcata, Cinnamomium olivieri, Synoum glandulosum, Pittosporum undulatum, Calamus muelleri and Alpinia caerulea (Armstrong 2002).

Cliff Rd and Contour Rd: grows on deep, red, basalt derived krasnozems soils in rainforest margins. At Cliff Rd it forms thickets in disturbed areas in the tall forest comprising a rainforest margin (Fitzsimmons 1999).

Adequate drainage may be a factor influencing the location of the species (Fitzsimmons 1999).

Flowers are borne throughout the year but peak from Aug. to Oct.(Stanley & Ross 1983; Fitzsimmons 1999). Mature fruit have been observed in Nov. A period of about six weeks is required for fruit to ripen. The species has the ability to produce large quantities of viable seed. Seeds are released once the fruit is ripe, i.e. they are not stored on the plant for extended periods. Within the populations surveyed (during 1997, most seedlings grew close to, but not directly beneath, parent plants. Seedling survivorship was high with several seedlings demonstrating notable resilience, surviving severe defoliation (Fitzsimmons 1999).

Average monthly increases in height were c. 4 cm during the peak growth period in mid to late spring and early summer. In contrast, average monthly growth rates in the winter months ranged from 0.4-0.7 cm. If the shrubs continue to grow an average of 4 cm per month over the summer months, then it is feasible that seedlings may reach reproductive maturity within two to three years (Fitzsimmons 1999).

The species does not have a lignotuber (McDonald, W.J.F. in Fitzsimmons 1999), nor other mechanisms for regeneration following fire. There are few, if any epicormic buds, no large food stores in stems or roots and no protective layer of thick, insulating bark. These factors suggest that the plant would be killed by fire. The species does not appear to need fire to complete its lifecycle. It has been observed to flower, fruit, seed and germinate in the absence of fire. However, fire, of infrequent interval and outside the flowering/seeding period may benefit the species by creating habitable niches where previously the species may have been in successional decline. Anecdotal observations suggest that this species is an opportunistic colonist that responds to disturbance events, including fire and clearing (Fitzsimmons 1999).

The following table lists known and perceived threats to this species. Threats are based on the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN) threat classification version 1.1.

Threat Class Threatening Species References
Climate Change and Severe Weather:Habitat Shifting and Alteration:Habitat loss, modification and/or degradation Border Ranges Rainforest Biodiversity Management Plan - NSW & Queensland (NSW Department of Environment, Climate Change and Water (NSW DECCW), 2010n) [State Recovery Plan].
Ecosystem/Community Stresses:Ecosystem Degradation:Decline in habitat quality Border Ranges Rainforest Biodiversity Management Plan - NSW & Queensland (NSW Department of Environment, Climate Change and Water (NSW DECCW), 2010n) [State Recovery Plan].
Ecosystem/Community Stresses:Indirect Ecosystem Effects:Loss and/or fragmentation of habitat and/or subpopulations Zieria collina in Species Profile and Threats (SPRAT) database (Department of the Environment and Heritage (DEH), 2006xa) [Internet].
Border Ranges Rainforest Biodiversity Management Plan - NSW & Queensland (NSW Department of Environment, Climate Change and Water (NSW DECCW), 2010n) [State Recovery Plan].
Ecosystem/Community Stresses:Indirect Ecosystem Effects:Restricted geographical distribution (area of occupancy and extent of occurrence) Zieria collina in Species Profile and Threats (SPRAT) database (Department of the Environment and Heritage (DEH), 2006xa) [Internet].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive Non-Native/Alien Species:Competition and/or habitat degradation Lantana camara (Lantana, Common Lantana, Kamara Lantana, Large-leaf Lantana, Pink Flowered Lantana, Red Flowered Lantana, Red-Flowered Sage, White Sage, Wild Sage) Zieria collina in Species Profile and Threats (SPRAT) database (Department of the Environment and Heritage (DEH), 2006xa) [Internet].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive Non-Native/Alien Species:Competition and/or habitat degradation by weeds Zieria collina in Species Profile and Threats (SPRAT) database (Department of the Environment and Heritage (DEH), 2006xa) [Internet].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Presence of pathogens and resulting disease Border Ranges Rainforest Biodiversity Management Plan - NSW & Queensland (NSW Department of Environment, Climate Change and Water (NSW DECCW), 2010n) [State Recovery Plan].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Problematic Native Species:Competition, predation and/or habitat degradation by insects Zieria collina in Species Profile and Threats (SPRAT) database (Department of the Environment and Heritage (DEH), 2006xa) [Internet].
Natural System Modifications:Fire and Fire Suppression:Inappropriate and/or changed fire regimes (frequency, timing, intensity) Commonwealth Conservation Advice on Zieria collina (Threatened Species Scientific Committee, 2008xi) [Conservation Advice].
Residential and Commercial Development:Housing and Urban Areas:Habitat loss, modification and fragmentation due to urban development Zieria collina in Species Profile and Threats (SPRAT) database (Department of the Environment and Heritage (DEH), 2006xa) [Internet].
Transportation and Service Corridors:Roads and Railroads:Development and/or maintenance of roads Commonwealth Conservation Advice on Zieria collina (Threatened Species Scientific Committee, 2008xi) [Conservation Advice].

Armstrong, J.A. (1991). Studies on pollination and systematics in the Australian Rutaceae. Ph.D. Thesis. University of New South Wales, Sydney.

Armstrong, J.A. (2002). Zieria (Rutaceae): a systematic and evolutionary study. Australian Systematic Botany. 15:277-463.

Fitzsimmons, L.E. (1999). Management of Zieria collina C.T. White. M.Sc. Thesis. University of New England.

Queensland Herbarium (2008b). Unpublished data.

Stanley, T.D. & E.M. Ross (1983). Flora of south-eastern Queensland. Volume One. Brisbane, Queensland: Department of Primary Industries.

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This database is designed to provide statutory, biological and ecological information on species and ecological communities, migratory species, marine species, and species and species products subject to international trade and commercial use protected under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (the EPBC Act). It has been compiled from a range of sources including listing advice, recovery plans, published literature and individual experts. While reasonable efforts have been made to ensure the accuracy of the information, no guarantee is given, nor responsibility taken, by the Commonwealth for its accuracy, currency or completeness. The Commonwealth does not accept any responsibility for any loss or damage that may be occasioned directly or indirectly through the use of, or reliance on, the information contained in this database. The information contained in this database does not necessarily represent the views of the Commonwealth. This database is not intended to be a complete source of information on the matters it deals with. Individuals and organisations should consider all the available information, including that available from other sources, in deciding whether there is a need to make a referral or apply for a permit or exemption under the EPBC Act.

Citation: Department of the Environment (2014). Zieria collina in Species Profile and Threats Database, Department of the Environment, Canberra. Available from: http://www.environment.gov.au/sprat. Accessed Fri, 18 Apr 2014 19:55:19 +1000.