Biodiversity

Species Profile and Threats Database


For information to assist proponents in referral, environmental assessments and compliance issues, refer to the Policy Statements and Guidelines (where available), the Conservation Advice (where available) or the Listing Advice (where available).
 
In addition, proponents and land managers should refer to the Recovery Plan (where available) or the Conservation Advice (where available) for recovery, mitigation and conservation information.

EPBC Act Listing Status Listed as Vulnerable as Nannoperca obscura
Recovery Plan Decision Recovery Plan required, included on the Commenced List (1/11/2009).
 
Adopted/Made Recovery Plans National Recovery Plan for the Yarry Pygmy Perch (Nannoperca obscura) (Saddlier, S. & M.Hammer, 2010) [Recovery Plan] as Nannoperca obscura.
 
Policy Statements and Guidelines Survey guidelines for Australia's threatened fish. EPBC Act survey guidelines 6.4 (Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities (DSEWPaC), 2011i) [Admin Guideline].
 
Federal Register of
    Legislative Instruments
Declaration under s178, s181, and s183 of the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 - List of threatened species, List of threatened ecological communities and List of threatening processes (Commonwealth of Australia, 2000) [Legislative Instrument] as Nannoperca obscura.
 
State Government
    Documents and Websites
SA:Action plan for South Australian freshwater fishes (Hammer M., S. Wedderburn & J. Van Weenen, 2009) [State Action Plan].
State Listing Status
VIC: Listed as Threatened (Flora and Fauna Guarantee Act 1988 (Victoria): February 2014) as Edelia obscura
Non-statutory Listing Status
IUCN: Listed as Vulnerable (IUCN Red List of Threatened Species: 2011.2)
SA: Listed as Critically Endangered (Action Plan for South Australian Freshwater Fishes 2009)
VIC: Listed as Vulnerable (Advisory List of Threatened Vertebrate Fauna in Victoria: 2013)
Scientific name Nannoperca obscura [26177]
Family Percichthyidae:Perciformes:Actinopterygii:Chordata:Animalia
Species author (Klunzinger 1872)
Infraspecies author  
Reference  
Other names Edelia obscura [56787]
Distribution map Species Distribution Map

This is an indicative distribution map of the present distribution of the species based on best available knowledge. See map caveat for more information.

Illustrations Google Images
http://www.adelaide.edu.au/pr/media/releases/2001/images/yarrapp.jpg ;
http://zoo.latrobe.edu.au/herp/woodward.htm

Scientific name: Nannoperca obscura

Synonyms: Edelia obscura, Paradules obscurus, Microperca yarrae

Common name: Yarra Pygmy Perch

The Yarra Pygmy Perch is a dusky, pale, brownish-grey, sometimes greenish fish with a pale belly, spots along the midline, and clear, faint yellow to black fins. It has been known to grown up to 7.5 cm but more commonly grows to about 6.5 cm (McDowall 1996). Unlike other members of the genus, the Yarra Pygmy Perch has a pre-orbital bone that is not completely covered by skin, exposing its serrated lower edge (Kuiter & Allen 1986).

The Yarra Pygmy Perch is known from 42 locations between the Bunyip River basin in West Gippsland west through southern Victoria and in south-eastern South Australia, as far west as Lake Alexandrina and the Finniss River, near the mouth of the Murray River. Within this range, distribution is patchy and highly fragmented (Saddlier & Hammer 2010). Most populations (31) occur on private land or public land managed for purposes other than nature conservation (Saddlier & Hammer 2010). Only seven populations occur in some form of reserve: one in a national park (Grampians National Park); two in Discovery Bay Coastal Park and five in reserves (Lake Corangamite, Floating Islands Lagoon, Bool Lagoon, Lake Bonney, Murray Mouth Reserve), while three additional sites are listed in the 'Directory of Important Wetlands' (Lake Corangamite, Glenelg River, Bool Lagoon) (EA 2001a; Hammer et al. 2002; Saddlier & Hammer 2010).

Some populations are tiny, occurring in extremely limited, ephemeral habitat, while others are quite large and extensive and occur in permanent waterways (Saddlier & Hammer 2010). Small, isolated populations exist between Melbourne and the Hopkins River system in south-west Victoria, but the major Victorian populations are located between the Barwon River and the South Australia border (Raadik 2002 pers. comm.). Populations supporting high densities of individuals can still be found in some locations including the Glenelg River, Merri River and Bridgewater Lakes in Victoria, and Mosquito Creek in South Australia (Saddlier & Hammer 2010). There is also a strong population at lower Drain M in South Australia, where refuge holes have been dug to drought-proof the site (Slater & Hammer 2009 cited in Saddlier et al. 2013).

Between 1983 and 1993, this species was found in the following streams flowing through private land: Crawford River; Bridgewater; Darlot Creek; Eumeralla Creek; Fitzroy River; Surrey River; Merri River; Spring Creek; Woadi Yallock Creek; Waurn Ponds Creek; Deep Creek (Lancefield); Dandenong Creek (now extinct) (Wager & Jackson 1993). The species has also been recorded in Mount Emu Creek near Garvoc (Ecology Partners 2009) and the Wyndgate area (Hammer et al. 2002).

The Yarra Pygmy Perch was almost certainly once more widespread, but has declined in both distribution and abundance since European settlement of Australia. The fragmented and patchy nature of its remaining habitat across the landscape, and variability of this habitat between seasons and years, makes the species extremely vulnerable to local extinctions. Reduced flooding and loss of habitat linkages greatly reduce the ability to recolonise habitats (Saddlier & Hammer 2010). Remnant populations have been substantially fragmented and depleted by wetland drainage, modification and river regulation, problems exacerbated by the protracted 'millennium drought' (1997–2010; Murphy & Timbal 2008 cited in Saddlier et al. 2013). Populations have become extinct, namely Yarra River (in 1872), Dandenong Creek (in 1982 and has caused an eastward range contraction) and Gnarkeet Creek in Victoria, and Lake Alexandrina (in 2008) and Lake Bonney in South Australia (Hammer et al. 2013; Saddlier & Hammer 2010). The species was rescued from Lake Alexandrina and Lake Bonney, and a program for release has begun (Hammer et al. 2013).

The Yarra Pygmy Perch typically occurs in lakes, ponds and slow-flowing rivers (Saddlier & Hammer 2010), but prefers small-medium sized, relatively shallow (1-2 m) freshwater streams with moderate to high flow (Saddlier et al. 2013). It is a demersal species that completes itslife cycle in freshwater, are usually associated with large amounts of aquatic vegetation (particularly emergent vegetation), and log snags, in clear, fresh to slightly brackish water (Llewellyn 1980; Woodward & Malone 2002; Bice & Ye 2006 cited in Saddlier et al. 2013)

The distributional range of the Yarra Pygmy Perch coincides with Victoria's ancient volcanic region; most streams in this area are notably alkaline and have a high mineral content (Briggs 1999). The species occurs in Deep Creek which is a clear, slow to steady flowing creek with a silt or solid rock substrate. In winter, the average depth is around 0.5-1.5 m. Summer water levels are greatly reduced, with little if any water flow. Typical winter water temperatures are 7-9 °C and summer water temperature averages 17-19 °C. Water chemistry is pH 7.6-7.8. In artificial ponds this species has survived minimum and maximum water temperatures of 5 °C and 35 °C, respectively (Briggs 1999).

The Yarra Pygmy Perch is a free-swimming species whose entire life cycle is completed in freshwater (Cadwallader & Backhouse 1983). It is short lived (1-5 years) (Saddlier et al. 2013) and probably has poor dispersal ability, as suggested by the strong genetic structure (Hammer et al. 2010 cited in Saddlier et al. 2013). The species spawns during spring (September to October) (Cadwallader & Backhouse 1983) at water temperatures of 16-24 °C (Kuiter et al. 1996) when males and females are 3.5 and 4 cm in length, respectively. Very little is known of the breeding biology of this species, although it is assumed that breeding behaviour is similar to the closely related Southern Pygmy Perch (Nannoperca australis), which lays demersal, non-adhesive eggs over aquatic vegetation and the substrate (Llewellyn 1974).

Yarra Pygmy Perch are usually found in small groups, often occurring with the Southern Pygmy Perch (McDowall 1996) and the Variegated Pygmy Perch (Nannoperca variegata), although the Yarra Pygmy Perch appears to prefer slightly stronger flows (Kuiter et al. 1996). Growth in captivity is slow, with individuals reaching 1.5 cm at five months of age (Leggett & Merrick 1987).

Diet of the Yarra Pygmy Perch includes insects, insect larvae and planktonic crustaceans (Allen 1989a).

The Survey guidelines for Australia's threatened fish (DSEWPaC 2011i) includes survey design principles when planning a fish survey and includes recommendations for survey methods for the Variegated Pygmy Perch and the habitat that it occurs in (DSEWPaC 2011i).

Major threats to the Yarra Pygmy Perch include wetland drainage, habitat damage through grazing and lack of regeneration, altered hydrology and introduced fish (Saddlier et al. 2013). The majority of known populations occur at sites that have little or no formal protection from many of the threats, and those that do have protection are exposed to broader threats affecting freshwater habitats and catchments (e.g. use of groundwater) (Saddlier et al. 2013). Distribution of populations is now generally disjunct and patchy, due to the fragmented nature of the remaining lowland shallow freshwater wetland habitat (Saddlier & Hammer 2010).

Loss of habitat

The nature of the lowland, shallow freshwater habitat of Yarra Pygmy Perch means it is especially susceptible to a range of practices that result in its degradation and loss, especially where this habitat occurs on private land (Saddlier & Hammer 2010). Apart from the direct loss of habitat, lateral connectivity between wetlands and to more permanent waterbodies is also reduced. This connectivity is important for maintaining the life cycles of macroinvertebrates and aquatic plants, and consequently for species such as the Yarra Pygmy Perch that rely on these associations (Saddlier & Hammer 2010).

Altered hydrology

Alteration of natural flood and drying cycles, particularly in shallow creeks, through activities such as catchment clearing, establishing extensive plantations or construction of dams, pose threats to Yarra Pygmy Perch habitat. These activities may alter natural seasonal water levels at critical times of the year or may result in complete loss or permanent alteration of more shallow habitats. Populations occurring in smaller creeks on land where grazing is practiced (constituting the majority of known sites) are particularly susceptible to water abstraction for stock watering (Saddlier & Hammer 2010).

The extraction of groundwater, particularly in the south-east of South Australia is a clear threat to the ecological sustainability of the significant habitats and species of coastal springs in these areas (Hammer 2002 cited in Saddlier & Hammer 2010), as well as in Victoria. In the 1990s, the depth of the the greater Mt Gambier unconfined aquifer fell significantly, reducing the hydraulic pressure of the system (Saddlier & Hammer 2010).

Extensive plantations of eucalypts and pines in south-east South Australia and south-west Victoria pose a major threat to habitat through lowering ground water levels and decreasing runoff into waterways. More wide-scale clearing of catchment vegetation may lead to elevated agricultural runoff that may directly affect water quality (through increased input of sediment, pesticides/herbicides etc) or increase the risk of algal blooms through increased water nutrient levels and sedimentation. Catchment clearing and subsequent tree plantation establishment are also likely to cause altered hydrological regimes (Vertessy et al. 2000 cited in Saddlier et al. 2013) resulting in reduced catchment water yield and direct aquatic habitat loss (Saddlier & Hammer 2010).

Predation, competition and habitat alteration by fish species

Predation by Redfin Perch (Perca fluviatilis), Brown Trout (Salmo trutta) and Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) may be causing decline of Yarra Pygmy Perch (Wager & Jackson 1993). Other pygmy perch species have been detected in the stomach contents of Redfin Perch, suggesting that the Yarra Pygmy Perch may also be targeted (Saddlier & Hammer 2010). Damage to aquatic vegetation by Common Carp (Cyprinus carpio) may also impact on habitat critical to the survival of this species while competition/aggressive behaviour (particularly from Eastern Gambusia Gambusia holbrooki) are also implicated in the decline of this species (Wager & Jackson 1993).

In-stream and riparian habitat degradation

Land clearing and unrestricted stock access to riparian zones is widespread and leads to a reduction in aquatic and riparian vegetation levels (Belsky et al. 1999 cited in Saddlier et al. 2013), increased nutrient run-off, a reduction in bank stability and increased erosion and sedimentation (Belsky et al. 1999 cited in Saddlier et al. 2013; Clary & Kruse 2004 cited in Saddlier et al. 2013), increased summer water temperatures (Arthington & Pusey 2003 cited in Saddlier et al. 2013) and the risk of algal blooms.

Sedimentation has direct effects on fish including asphyxiation, the smothering of eggs, a reduced ability to find food and the smothering of stream beds which leads to a reduction in habitat and flows (Gray et al. 2012 cited in Saddlier et al. 2013; Newcombe & Jensen 1996 cited in Saddlier et al. 2013). Additionally, sedimentation reduces the level and diversity of aquatic macroinvertebrates and plants (DSE 2007b cited in Saddlier & Hammer 2010), factors considered critical components of Yarra Pygmy Perch habitat. Decreased overhanging vegetation increases summer water temperatures which in turn may lead (particularly when combined with increased nutrient input) to algal blooms. Further physical disturbance of smaller waters may also occur through practices such as drainage and ploughing after water levels are reduced (Saddlier & Hammer 2010). Large inputs of sediment following fires can have devastating impacts on stream fish populations (Lyon & O’Connor 2008 cited in Saddlier et al. 2013). Further disturbance to wetlands occurs through practices such as ploughing when wetlands are dry. In some rivers, the development of 'sand-slugs' (i.e. discrete slugs of travelling sand particles) subsequently alters habitat structure with links to declines in regional fish diversity (Howson et al. 2010). Sediment deposition alters habitat structure by decreasing channel depth and changing substrate composition and burying woody debris (Howson et al. 2009).

The identification, protection and restoration of high-quality refuges is a key to reducing extinction risk to freshwater fishes, especially in drought-prone areas (Hoagstrom et al. 2011 cited in Saddlier et al. 2013) and there is an urgent need for this to be undertaken for the Yarra Pygmy Perch. Detailed threat information is not available for the majority of locations where this species occurs, particularly in Victoria. Raising landholder awareness about their requirements and threats to the species is also considered a priority action for Victorian populations (Saddlier et al. 2013).

Saddlier and colleagues (2013) reviewed the implemenation of the National Recovery Plan for the Yarra Pygmy Perch (Saddlier & Hammer 2010) against the objectives outlined in the plan:

  • Determine distribution and abundance: recent basic population information is available for South Australian populations (Hammer et al. 2009b cited in Saddlier et al. 2013), but recent distribution data in Victoria is lacking (Saddlier et al. 2013).
  • Determine the genetic and taxonomic status of populations: the status of the species is well defined (Unmack et al. 2011 cited in Saddlier et al. 2013). Four evolutionarily significant units have been identified, as well as population substructure within lineages and a coarse assessment of within-site genetic variability (Hammer et al. 2010 cited in Saddlier et al. 2013). Studies on fine-scale landscape genetics (gene flow) and individual genotyping (including paternity) have been initiated (Carvalho et al. 2011 cited in Saddlier et al. 2013).
  • Determine habitat characteristics and requirements: assessment of the environmental requirements (flow, water quality and habitat of Yarra Pygmy Perch) has occurred in South Australia, especially for Lake Alexandrina, Henry Creek and Mosquito Creek (see Hammer et al. 2009b cited in Saddlier et al. 2013). Much recent activity has focused on urgent need and risk assessment in the face of critical habitat threats in the Lower Murray and south-eastern regions of South Australia, and similar work has occurred in the Glenelg River (ARI 2003 cited in Saddlier et al. 2013), some general site observations exist for other Victorian sites (Saddlier et al. 2013).
  • Identify and manage potentially threatening processes affecting conservation: during the 'millennium drought', core refuges were identified and emergency watering and rescues were subsequently conducted (Slater & Hammer 2009 cited in Saddlier et al. 2013; Hammer et al. 2013). Adaptive management was attempted for Henry Creek to counter the negative impacts of drainage and stock exclusion projects were established on parts of Mosquito Creek. Some recognition of environmental water requirements is included in relevant water-allocation planning. In Victoria threats and recommended threat abatement actions have been identified for Curdies River, Sutherland Creek, Woady Yallock Creek, Thompsons Creek, Pennyroyal Creek, Waurn Ponds Creek and the Barwon River (Saddlier et al. 2009 cited in Saddlier et al. 2013). The management decision not to stock golden perch should remain.
  • Protect key populations across the range: two sites have been added to the South Australia state reserve system: the Wyndgate property on Hindmarsh Island and Pick Swamp adjoining Piccaninnie Ponds Conservation Park (Saddlier et al. 2013).
  • Determine population trends at key sites: studies in South Australia have been conducted in a holistic manner, covering all populations, with strong input to management response, in Victoria population monitoring has occurred in a more piecemeal manner (Saddlier et al. 2013).
  • Investigate key aspects of biology and ecology: for the purpose of conservation management, some key aspects of the biology (such as habitat and environmental water requirements) are reasonably well known, and some data on the range of environmental conditions these species are able to tolerate (collated during population surveys) are available and are currently being used to provide management recommendations, particularly under dry inflow conditions (Saddlier et al. 2013).
  • Establish a captive breeding population: at the height of critical water shortages in 2007-2009, fish were rescued from Lake Alexandrina and established in ponds, followed by transfer to artificial refuges for eventual reintroduction (Hammer et al. 2013), and rescues were undertaken for Lake Bonney, Mosquito Creek, Crescent Pond and Drain M and fish were released directly, or bred in an aquarium facility (Kingston High School) before being released, into artificial refuges. No progress has been made in Victoria (Saddlier et al. 2013).
  • Establish new populations: the number of known populations has decreased since 2000, but captive-bred fish have successfully been established in three farm dams in the Adelaide Hills and reintroductions to former habitat in Lake Alexandrina are beginning to occur (Hammer et al. 2013). The status of populations stocked into artificial refuge dams in the south-east of South Australia is indeterminate, however at least one dam has shown sign of sustaining a population (Saddlier et al. 2013).
  • Increase community and stakeholder awareness and involvement: the Native Fish Strategy (NFS) of the Murray Darling Basin Authority was a major initiative, with a goal to rehabilitate native fish communities in the basin (Koehn & Lintermans 2012 cited in Saddlier et al. 2013). Part of the species range was covered by this strategy.

Management practices that should be adhered to by land and water managers in order to avoid threatening processes believed to be responsible for the decline in the Yarra Pygmy Perch include (Saddlier & Hammer 2010):

  • No direct loss of habitat through wetland drainage on either public or private land.
  • No physical alteration to habitat as a consequence of incidental works on land adjoining Yarra Pygmy Perch habitat.
  • Applications for water abstraction or dam construction do not compromise flow regimes for Yarra Pygmy Perch.
  • Habitat and adjoining riparian habitat are fenced off to stock access.
  • Off-stream watering points are provided for stock.
  • No further damage to riparian vegetation.
  • Damaged or depleted riparian vegetation is protected and (if necessary) supplemented by active revegetation works.
  • Plans to clear vegetation lying adjacent to Yarra Pygmy Perch habitat will not impact upon water quality (no increase in sedimentation/nutrient levels/pesticides/herbicides etc).
  • Plans to revegetate with plantation timber/crops will not impact upon overall water yield (and subsequently flow regime of Yarra Pygmy Perch habitat).
  • Proposals to translocate aquatic species into Yarra Pygmy Perch habitat are subject to relevant risk management processes according to relevant national and State guidelines.

The following projects have received government funding grants for conservation and recovery work benfiting the Yarra Pygmy Perch:

Thompsons Creek Catchment Committee received $5,000 of funding through the Threatened Species Network Community Grants in 2000-01 for on-ground works and community education to protect small and isolated habitat of this species, and to encourage the community to promote protection of this species.

Tahara West Landcare Protection Group received $19 900 of funding through the Threatened Species Network Community Grants in 2000-01 for the securing of suitable habitat by fencing riverbank vegetation to prevent cattle access, and by implementing revegetation programs.

Deep Creek Landcare Group received $3,800 of funding through the Threatened Species Network Community Grants in 2000-01 for fencing a 1 ha section of riverbank vegetation, planting of indigenous plant species, erection of signs to promote the significance of the site and the impacts of grazing, and the poaching and threatened status of the Yarra Pygmy Perch.

The following table lists known and perceived threats to this species. Threats are based on the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN) threat classification version 1.1.

Threat Class Threatening Species References
Agriculture and Aquaculture:Livestock Farming and Grazing:Grazing pressures and associated habitat changes Personal communication (Raadik, T.A., 2002) [Personal Communication].
Regional Recovery Plan for Threatened Species & Ecological Communities of Adelaide and Mount Lofty Ranges 2009-2014 (Willson, A. & J. Bignall, 2009a) [State Recovery Plan].
Agriculture and Aquaculture:Livestock Farming and Grazing:Habitat alteration (vegetation, soil, hydrology) due to trampling and grazing by livestock Inundation study (Environmental Resources Information Network, 2007) [Database].
National Recovery Plan for the Yarry Pygmy Perch (Nannoperca obscura) (Saddlier, S. & M.Hammer, 2010) [Recovery Plan].
Biological Resource Use:Fishing and Harvesting Aquatic Resources:Overfishing, competition with fishing operations and overfishing of prey fishing Regional Recovery Plan for Threatened Species & Ecological Communities of Adelaide and Mount Lofty Ranges 2009-2014 (Willson, A. & J. Bignall, 2009a) [State Recovery Plan].
Biological Resource Use:Hunting and Collecting Terrestrial Animals:Illegal hunting/harvesting and collection National Recovery Plan for the Yarry Pygmy Perch (Nannoperca obscura) (Saddlier, S. & M.Hammer, 2010) [Recovery Plan].
Regional Recovery Plan for Threatened Species & Ecological Communities of Adelaide and Mount Lofty Ranges 2009-2014 (Willson, A. & J. Bignall, 2009a) [State Recovery Plan].
Climate Change and Severe Weather:Climate Change and Severe Weather:Climate change altering atmosphere/hydrosphere temperatures, rainfall patterns and/or frequency of severe weather events National Recovery Plan for the Yarry Pygmy Perch (Nannoperca obscura) (Saddlier, S. & M.Hammer, 2010) [Recovery Plan].
Regional Recovery Plan for Threatened Species & Ecological Communities of Adelaide and Mount Lofty Ranges 2009-2014 (Willson, A. & J. Bignall, 2009a) [State Recovery Plan].
Climate Change and Severe Weather:Habitat Shifting and Alteration:Habitat loss, modification and/or degradation National Recovery Plan for the Yarry Pygmy Perch (Nannoperca obscura) (Saddlier, S. & M.Hammer, 2010) [Recovery Plan].
Climate Change and Severe Weather:Sea level rise:Inundation associated with climate change Inundation study (Environmental Resources Information Network, 2007) [Database].
Ecosystem/Community Stresses:Ecosystem Degradation:Habitat deterioration due to soil degradation and erosion National Recovery Plan for the Yarry Pygmy Perch (Nannoperca obscura) (Saddlier, S. & M.Hammer, 2010) [Recovery Plan].
Energy Production and Mining:Mining and Quarrying:Habitat destruction, disturbance and/or modification due to mining activities Regional Recovery Plan for Threatened Species & Ecological Communities of Adelaide and Mount Lofty Ranges 2009-2014 (Willson, A. & J. Bignall, 2009a) [State Recovery Plan].
Human Intrusions and Disturbance:Recreational Activities:Disturbance, especially from human recreational activities and development Regional Recovery Plan for Threatened Species & Ecological Communities of Adelaide and Mount Lofty Ranges 2009-2014 (Willson, A. & J. Bignall, 2009a) [State Recovery Plan].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive Non-Native/Alien Species:Competition and/or predation Carassius auratus (Goldfish) Yarra Pigmy Perch Edelia obscura (Briggs, G., 1999) [Journal].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive Non-Native/Alien Species:Competition and/or predation Gambusia holbrooki (Eastern Gambusia, Mosquitofish) Inundation study (Environmental Resources Information Network, 2007) [Database].
National Recovery Plan for the Yarry Pygmy Perch (Nannoperca obscura) (Saddlier, S. & M.Hammer, 2010) [Recovery Plan].
The Action Plan For Australian Freshwater Fishes (Wager, R. & P. Jackson, 1993) [Cwlth Action Plan].
Regional Recovery Plan for Threatened Species & Ecological Communities of Adelaide and Mount Lofty Ranges 2009-2014 (Willson, A. & J. Bignall, 2009a) [State Recovery Plan].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive Non-Native/Alien Species:Competition and/or predation Oncorhynchus mykiss (Rainbow Trout) Inundation study (Environmental Resources Information Network, 2007) [Database].
National Recovery Plan for the Yarry Pygmy Perch (Nannoperca obscura) (Saddlier, S. & M.Hammer, 2010) [Recovery Plan].
The Action Plan For Australian Freshwater Fishes (Wager, R. & P. Jackson, 1993) [Cwlth Action Plan].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive Non-Native/Alien Species:Competition and/or predation Perca fluviatilis (Redfin, Redfin Perch) Inundation study (Environmental Resources Information Network, 2007) [Database].
National Recovery Plan for the Yarry Pygmy Perch (Nannoperca obscura) (Saddlier, S. & M.Hammer, 2010) [Recovery Plan].
The Action Plan For Australian Freshwater Fishes (Wager, R. & P. Jackson, 1993) [Cwlth Action Plan].
Regional Recovery Plan for Threatened Species & Ecological Communities of Adelaide and Mount Lofty Ranges 2009-2014 (Willson, A. & J. Bignall, 2009a) [State Recovery Plan].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive Non-Native/Alien Species:Competition and/or predation Salmo trutta (Brown Trout) Inundation study (Environmental Resources Information Network, 2007) [Database].
National Recovery Plan for the Yarry Pygmy Perch (Nannoperca obscura) (Saddlier, S. & M.Hammer, 2010) [Recovery Plan].
The Action Plan For Australian Freshwater Fishes (Wager, R. & P. Jackson, 1993) [Cwlth Action Plan].
Regional Recovery Plan for Threatened Species & Ecological Communities of Adelaide and Mount Lofty Ranges 2009-2014 (Willson, A. & J. Bignall, 2009a) [State Recovery Plan].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive Non-Native/Alien Species:Competition, predation and/or habitat degradation Cyprinus carpio (European Carp, Common Carp) Inundation study (Environmental Resources Information Network, 2007) [Database].
National Recovery Plan for the Yarry Pygmy Perch (Nannoperca obscura) (Saddlier, S. & M.Hammer, 2010) [Recovery Plan].
The Action Plan For Australian Freshwater Fishes (Wager, R. & P. Jackson, 1993) [Cwlth Action Plan].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive Non-Native/Alien Species:Competition, predation and/or habitat degradation Tinca tinca (Tench) Yarra Pigmy Perch Edelia obscura (Briggs, G., 1999) [Journal].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Algal blooms National Recovery Plan for the Yarry Pygmy Perch (Nannoperca obscura) (Saddlier, S. & M.Hammer, 2010) [Recovery Plan].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Presence of pathogens and resulting disease Regional Recovery Plan for Threatened Species & Ecological Communities of Adelaide and Mount Lofty Ranges 2009-2014 (Willson, A. & J. Bignall, 2009a) [State Recovery Plan].
Natural System Modifications:Dams and Water Management/Use:Activities that lead to swamp degradation National Recovery Plan for the Yarry Pygmy Perch (Nannoperca obscura) (Saddlier, S. & M.Hammer, 2010) [Recovery Plan].
Natural System Modifications:Dams and Water Management/Use:Alteration of hydrological regimes and water quality National Recovery Plan for the Yarry Pygmy Perch (Nannoperca obscura) (Saddlier, S. & M.Hammer, 2010) [Recovery Plan].
Regional Recovery Plan for Threatened Species & Ecological Communities of Adelaide and Mount Lofty Ranges 2009-2014 (Willson, A. & J. Bignall, 2009a) [State Recovery Plan].
Natural System Modifications:Dams and Water Management/Use:Alterations to hydrology through water extraction Inundation study (Environmental Resources Information Network, 2007) [Database].
Natural System Modifications:Dams and Water Management/Use:Changes in hydrological regimes due to water storages Inundation study (Environmental Resources Information Network, 2007) [Database].
Natural System Modifications:Dams and Water Management/Use:Changes in hydrology including habitat drainage Inundation study (Environmental Resources Information Network, 2007) [Database].
National Recovery Plan for the Yarry Pygmy Perch (Nannoperca obscura) (Saddlier, S. & M.Hammer, 2010) [Recovery Plan].
The Action Plan For Australian Freshwater Fishes (Wager, R. & P. Jackson, 1993) [Cwlth Action Plan].
Natural System Modifications:Dams and Water Management/Use:Riparian vegetation degradation National Recovery Plan for the Yarry Pygmy Perch (Nannoperca obscura) (Saddlier, S. & M.Hammer, 2010) [Recovery Plan].
Natural System Modifications:Dams and Water Management/Use:Stress caused by water table reduction National Recovery Plan for the Yarry Pygmy Perch (Nannoperca obscura) (Saddlier, S. & M.Hammer, 2010) [Recovery Plan].
Natural System Modifications:Dams and Water Management/Use:drawdown caused by pine plantations National Recovery Plan for the Yarry Pygmy Perch (Nannoperca obscura) (Saddlier, S. & M.Hammer, 2010) [Recovery Plan].
Natural System Modifications:Fire and Fire Suppression:Inappropriate and/or changed fire regimes (frequency, timing, intensity) Regional Recovery Plan for Threatened Species & Ecological Communities of Adelaide and Mount Lofty Ranges 2009-2014 (Willson, A. & J. Bignall, 2009a) [State Recovery Plan].
Natural System Modifications:Natural System Modifications:Indirect and direct habitat loss due to human activities Inundation study (Environmental Resources Information Network, 2007) [Database].
Natural System Modifications:Other Ecosystem Modifications:Removal of wood snags from waterways Regional Recovery Plan for Threatened Species & Ecological Communities of Adelaide and Mount Lofty Ranges 2009-2014 (Willson, A. & J. Bignall, 2009a) [State Recovery Plan].
Pollution:Pollution:Changes to water and sediment flows leading to erosion, siltation and pollution National Recovery Plan for the Yarry Pygmy Perch (Nannoperca obscura) (Saddlier, S. & M.Hammer, 2010) [Recovery Plan].
Pollution:Pollution:Habitat degradation and loss of water quality due to salinity, siltaton, nutrification and/or pollution National Recovery Plan for the Yarry Pygmy Perch (Nannoperca obscura) (Saddlier, S. & M.Hammer, 2010) [Recovery Plan].
Pollution:Pollution:Pestitcide application and runoff National Recovery Plan for the Yarry Pygmy Perch (Nannoperca obscura) (Saddlier, S. & M.Hammer, 2010) [Recovery Plan].
Pollution:Pollution:Pollution due to oil spills and other chemical pollutants Regional Recovery Plan for Threatened Species & Ecological Communities of Adelaide and Mount Lofty Ranges 2009-2014 (Willson, A. & J. Bignall, 2009a) [State Recovery Plan].
Residential and Commercial Development:Housing and Urban Areas:Habitat loss, modification and fragmentation due to urban development Regional Recovery Plan for Threatened Species & Ecological Communities of Adelaide and Mount Lofty Ranges 2009-2014 (Willson, A. & J. Bignall, 2009a) [State Recovery Plan].

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This database is designed to provide statutory, biological and ecological information on species and ecological communities, migratory species, marine species, and species and species products subject to international trade and commercial use protected under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (the EPBC Act). It has been compiled from a range of sources including listing advice, recovery plans, published literature and individual experts. While reasonable efforts have been made to ensure the accuracy of the information, no guarantee is given, nor responsibility taken, by the Commonwealth for its accuracy, currency or completeness. The Commonwealth does not accept any responsibility for any loss or damage that may be occasioned directly or indirectly through the use of, or reliance on, the information contained in this database. The information contained in this database does not necessarily represent the views of the Commonwealth. This database is not intended to be a complete source of information on the matters it deals with. Individuals and organisations should consider all the available information, including that available from other sources, in deciding whether there is a need to make a referral or apply for a permit or exemption under the EPBC Act.

Citation: Department of the Environment (2014). Nannoperca obscura in Species Profile and Threats Database, Department of the Environment, Canberra. Available from: http://www.environment.gov.au/sprat. Accessed Wed, 16 Apr 2014 15:37:09 +1000.