Biodiversity

Species Profile and Threats Database


For information to assist proponents in referral, environmental assessments and compliance issues, refer to the Policy Statements and Guidelines (where available), the Conservation Advice (where available) or the Listing Advice (where available).
 
In addition, proponents and land managers should refer to the Recovery Plan (where available) or the Conservation Advice (where available) for recovery, mitigation and conservation information.

EPBC Act Listing Status Listed as Endangered
Listing and Conservation Advices Commonwealth Conservation Advice for Phascogale calura (Red-tailed Phascogale) (Threatened Species Scientific Committee (TSSC), 2013fk) [Conservation Advice].
 
Recovery Plan Decision Recovery Plan required, included on the Commenced List (1/11/2009).
 
Adopted/Made Recovery Plans
Policy Statements and Guidelines Survey guidelines for Australia's threatened mammals. EPBC Act survey guidelines 6.5 (Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities (DSEWPaC), 2011j) [Admin Guideline].
 
Federal Register of
    Legislative Instruments
Declaration under s178, s181, and s183 of the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 - List of threatened species, List of threatened ecological communities and List of threatening processes (Commonwealth of Australia, 2000) [Legislative Instrument].
 
State Government
    Documents and Websites
NT:Threatened Species of the Northern Territory-Red-tailed Phascogale Phascogale calura (Pavey, C., 2006c) [Information Sheet].
VIC:Flora and Fauna Guarantee Action Statement 14 - Extinct Mammals 2 (Mansergh, I. & J. Seebeck, 2003) [State Action Plan].
WA:Fauna Profiles - Red-tailed Phascogale Phascogale calura (Gould, 1844) (Western Australia Department of Environment and Conservation (WA DEC), 2012d) [Information Sheet].
State Listing Status
NSW: Listed as Extinct (Threatened Species Conservation Act 1995 (New South Wales): December 2013)
NT: Listed as Extinct (Territory Parks and Wildlife Conservation Act 2000 (Northern Territory): 2012)
SA: Listed as Endangered (National Parks and Wildlife Act 1972 (South Australia): June 2011)
VIC: Listed as Threatened (Flora and Fauna Guarantee Act 1988 (Victoria): February 2014)
WA: Listed as Endangered (Wildlife Conservation Act 1950 (Western Australia): September 2013)
Non-statutory Listing Status
VIC: Listed as Regionally Extinct (Advisory List of Threatened Vertebrate Fauna in Victoria: 2013)
Scientific name Phascogale calura [316]
Family Dasyuridae:Polyprotodonta:Mammalia:Chordata:Animalia
Species author Gould,1844
Infraspecies author  
Reference  
Distribution map Species Distribution Map

This is an indicative distribution map of the present distribution of the species based on best available knowledge. See map caveat for more information.

Illustrations Google Images

Other common names: Red-tailed Wambenger, Kenngoor (Indigenous - Nyoongar)

The Red-tailed Phascogale is a small, arboreal, carnivorous marsupial with ash-grey fur above and cream fur below. Its distinctive tail grows up to 14.5 cm long, is reddish-brown on the base and ends in a brush of long black hair. This marsupial also has large, thin, reddish ears. This species is highly sexually dimorphic (Foster et al. 2006) with males growing to 12.2 cm long and weighing up to 68 grams, and females growing to 10.5 cm and weighing 48 grams (Bradley 1998; Cronin 1991).

Extant populations of the Red-tailed Phascogale are restricted to remnants of native vegetation throughout the wheat belt of south-western Western Australia (Kitchener 1981). They have been recorded from as far north as Beverly (south-east of Perth). Recent surveys have extended the eastern range of the species slightly to include Fitzgerald River National Park, but several populations present in the 1970s have not been relocated (Friend 1999). Isolated reserves as small as 67 ha are able to support populations of this species (Maxwell et al. 1996).

The extent of occurrence of the Red-tailed Phascogale was estimated to be 9440 km² based on records collected between 1995 and 2007.

This was measured by constructing a minimum convex polygon around records in the south-west of Western Australia. The polygon was cropped to the coastline and all islands excluded from the estimate. Where there were less than three records to a location, the locality was buffered to 2 km and the area (km²) of remnant vegetation and conservation estate within the buffer summed. Where there was no visible vegetation, available vegetation layer, or conservation estate, the entire buffered region (2 km²) was included in the extent calculations.

The records were obtained from the following sources:

  • Threatened and Priority Fauna Database (Western Australian Department of Environment and Conservation (DEC)) which contains records from a variety of sources and includes sighting records, roadkills and museum specimens
  • DEC Fauna File database
  • Western Australian Museum Database
  • various DEC District offices
  • consultation with private researchers
  • published sources.

Prior to agricultural expansion in the 1800s, the Red-tailed Phascogale was widespread throughout Western Australia and extended eastward to the Murray Darling basin in NSW (Bradley 1998). It was previously found in most arid and semi-arid regions of Australia. However, it suffered a significant range contraction following European settlement and is now known to occur only in the central and southern wheatbelt areas of Western Australia an area which receives an annual rainfall of between 350 and 600 mm (Bradley 1998).

The current area of occupancy of the Red-tailed Phascogale is estimated to be 1775 km², using 5 km² grids to estimate the area of occupancy and based on locations known from 1995 to 2007. Consideration was given to the home range size and dispersal capacity of the Red-tailed Phascogale when deciding on which grid square size to apply.

The records used to estimate the area of occupancy, were obtained from the same sources as the data used for calculating the are of occurrence.

A comparison of area of occupancy using data from pre-1995 and 1995–1997 is shown below and indicates a range contraction for the species, which supports published works about the species as documented in Kitchener (1981), and Friend and Friend (1993).

Year 5 km² grid
Post 1995–2007 1775
Pre–1995 2250
(DEC 2007)

Red-tailed Phascogales are known from numerous isolated locations in the south-west of Western Australia (DEC 2007).

There are various re-introduction programs in place for the Red-tailed Phascogale, involving a number of National Parks and zoos.

Alice Springs Desert Park (Northern Territory) has a captive colony and has released animals back into the park. A team at the same Park is studying a captive population of radio-collared Red-tailed Phascogales with a view to reintroducing them into an area of the Watarrka (Kings Canyon) National Park. The animals have been taken from south-west Western Australia to central Australia in a co-operative effort between DEC (Western Australia) and the Alice Springs Desert Park (Northern Territory).

Perth Zoo received a litter of pouch young in 1981. Several of the young were successfully raised, but none subsequently bred (DEC 2007; Spence 1982, cited in George 1990). Red-tailed Phascogales were bred in captivity at Kanyana Wildlife rehabilitation centre in Perth in 1995 (DEC 2007).

There were plans in 2004 to re-introduce Red-tailed Phascogales to the Francois Peron National Park (Shark Bay, Western Australia) from the Highbury, Boundain, East Yornaning and Tutanning populations. This was proposed but was not implemented, following concerns that ingestion of cat baits (which are used in the park) may pose a threat to the animals (DEC 2007).

The distribution of this species is severely fragmented.

Red-tailed Phascogales occur in isolated patches of remnant vegetation which are not contiguous and do not allow for recolonisation or movement between populations. They are threatened by habitat loss and fragmentation, frequent burning of remaining habitat and predation by foxes and cats (Foster et al. 2006).

The following is a summary of the surveys undertaken to date:


Location Date            
# trap
nights
# animals caught
or presence/absence
Land tenure
Dryandra State Forest 1971
1993
1994
1995
1996
2003





288
4 adults
5 individuals
2 individuals
2 individuals
2 individuals
Present
State Forest
Boyagin Nature Reserve
(east block)
1990–1992
1993
1994
1995
1996
2003





288
Unknown
Unknown
10 individuals
13 individuals
7 individuals
19 individuals
Nature Reserve
Weam and Pingeculling
Nature Reserves
1992
1993
1994
1995
1996

288
Unknown
22 individuals
12 individuals
13 individuals
32 individuals
Nature Reserve
Yillimining Nature Reserve 1990–1992
1993
1994
1995
1996

288
Unknown
16 individuals
19 individuals
4 individuals
5 individuals
Nature Reserve
Bendering Nature Reserve 1990–1992   Present Nature Reserve
North Kalgarin Nature Reserve 1980   Most recent record Nature Reserve
East Yornaning Nature Reserve 1980
1986
1987
1993
1994
1995
1996
2004


45
288
5 adults
3 females
11 individuals
58 individuals
45 individuals
31 individuals
35 individuals
Present
Nature Reserve
Tutanning Nature Reserve 1975
1993
1994
1995
1996
Oct 2004

288
3 adults
25 individuals
16 individuals
18 individuals
21 individuals
Present
Nature Reserve
Petercarring Nature Reserve 1990–1992   Present Nature Reserve
Chinocup Water Reserve #28395
(formerly 18803)
1994
June 1996
  6 individuals
Unknown
Nature Reserve
Lake Magenta Nature Reserve
#25113
1990–1992
2003
  Unknown
Present
Nature Reserve
Donglocking Nature Reserve 1990–1992
1994
1995
1996
2003
2005




288
Present
10 individuals
11 individuals
17 individuals
7 individuals
Present
Nature Reserve
Wagin Rifle Range Reserve #30443 June 1992
  2 females Rifle Range Reserve
Fitzgerald River National Park 2004   Present National Park
Mount Pleasant Nature Reserve August 1998   1 adult Nature Reserve
Nallian Nature Reserve March 1995
May 1999
  1 individual
19 individuals
Nature Reserve
Ockley Nature Reserve 1990–1992   Present Nature Reserve
Parkeyerring Nature Reserve #24792 June 1990
1990–1992
  1 adult
present
Nature Reserve
Highbury State Forest 1993
1994
1995
1996
2004
288 10 individuals
9 individuals
4 individuals
4 individuals
Present
State Forest
Unnamed Nature Reserve #38379 2003   1 female Nature Reserve
Wangeling Nature Reserve May 1999   6 adults Nature Reserve
Yackrikine Nature Reserve
#26787
June 1994
1999
2001
2003
2004
25


100
21 (8 males 13 females)
44
1
36
Present
Nature Reserve
Yarling Nature Reserve 1990–1992   Present Nature Reserve
Water Reserve #16776 May 2003
  3 males Water reserve
Jaloran Timber Reserve 1993
1994
1995
1996
288 6 individuals
18 individuals
5 individuals
6 individuals
Timber Reserve
Gravel Reserve #27923 1990–1992   Present Gravel reserve
Mt Latham PWD Reserve #27580 1990–1992
June 1992
  Present
Present
Other Crown Reserve
Reserve #14459 May 1993 120 5 individuals Nature Reserve
King Rock Reserve #9377 May 1993   1 adult female
Nature Reserve
Johns Well Nature Reserve #24599 June 1990
June 1992
May 1993
434 1 adult
0
0 (presumed locally extinct)
Nature Reserve
Dardanine Siding, Williams location
9981
June 1992   12 individuals Private property
(DEC 2007; Friend & Friend 1993; Friend & Scanlon 1996; Friend et al. 1994; Kitchener 1981)

The following reserves have been surveyed although there were no historical records of occurrence and the surveys failed to locate the species:


Location Year of survey
Mooramockining Hill (Wandering block State Forest) 1993
Hillman Nature Reserve #16904 1992
Gravel Reserve #15801 1992
Wingedyne Nature Reserve #28471 and Private Property near Reserve #28471 1992
Noombling Nature Reserve #26150 1992
Pumphreys Bridge Nature Reserve #21286 1992
Tarin Rock & North Tarin Rock Nature Reserve 1992
Cornnecup Nature Reserve #28552 1994
Birdwood Nature Reserve #27769 1999
Strathmore Hill Nature Reserve 1999
Calyerup Creek, vacant Crown Land adjacent to Fitzgerald River National Park 1992
Reserve #5339 1993
Nature Reserve #19122, Nature Reserve #19118 Not recorded
Mourambine Nature Reserve #6798 Not recorded
Hotham River Nature Reserve #8291 Between February 1990 and September 1992
Boonagin Nature Reserve #21287 Between February 1990 and September 1992
Dragon Rocks Nature Reserve #36128 April 1998
Newdegate townsite 1993
North Wagin Nature Reserve June 1990
(DEC 2007)

There is a museum record of a Red-tailed Phascogale at a reserve in Beverley in 2000, which would be the most northerly population of this species. However, there is no data on population size or whether the species still occurs there.

The Threatened Species Fauna File (DEC) has a note detailing that the species has turned up years later in areas that have been surveyed without a record (e.g. North Tarin Rock Nature Reserve and Lake Magenta Nature Reserve) (DEC 2007).

No overall population size or trend data are available. Population numbers are unknown (there are no published estimates) and reaching a statistically accurate estimate is very difficult as the species exists as many small, scattered subpopulations. The species also demonstrates annual male die-off, so population size fluctuates within and between years (DEC 2007).

The Red-tailed Phascogale is known from numerous isolated locations. It is not possible to estimate the population number and trends for these locations because they have not been adequately surveyed and the population numbers fluctuate within and between years so as to make any estimates meaningless (DEC 2007).

The current population trend for the Red-tailed Phascogale is not known. It has persisted in many reserves despite many threats, and it is possible that in these reserves the populations are stable. Overall, the species population has declined since European settlement. There is no data to indicate future changes in size (DEC 2007).

The species undergoes extreme natural fluctuations, owing to annual male die off and varying annual juvenile recruitment (DEC 2007).

The species' generation length is two years (DEC 2007).

All known populations are considered essential for the species recovery and long-term survival (DEC 2007). Because of the semelparous (male die-off) life history of this species, it is considered more susceptible to local extinction due to stochasitc events or threats.

Though the species has been found in many scattered populations, each occurrence provides greater security for the conservation of the Red-tailed Phascogale because threats are unlikely to have the same impact on each occurrence.

Red-tailed Phascogales have been recorded from 25 Nature Reserves, two National Parks, two State Forest areas, two water authority reserves, one Timber Reserve, one Gravel Reserve and one unallocated Crown Land Reserve.

Populations occur on Nature Reserves, Conservation Parks and National Parks. These are not managed specifically for Red-tailed Phascogales, but are managed generally for the conservation of flora and fauna. Populations occur in State Forest that are not managed for conservation, but are baited for foxes (DEC 2007).

The Red-tailed Phascogale's preferred habitats are Allocasuarina woodlands with hollow-containing eucalypts (e.g. Eucalyptus wandoo) and Gastrolobium spp. (Kitchener 1981; Maxwell et al. 1996).

Population numbers appear to be greatest in habitat that has been unburnt for 20 years or more (Kitchener 1981). A large proportion of nest sites are in highly flammable locations, such as, stands of dead Allocasuarina spp. and the skirts and stumps of live and dead grass trees (Xanthorrhoea spp.). No precise habitat information is available for the arid zone, or the southern and eastern semi-arid zone (Maxwell et al. 1996).

Red-tailed Phascogales have also been recovered from a variety of habitats in the Katanning District, including woodland of Swamp Oak (Casuarina obesa) over Samphires, Mallee-Scrub and low forest of Moort (Eucalyptus platypus) (DEC 2007).

The Red-tailed Phascogale prefers vegetation that is unburnt for a long time, which provides continuous canopy cover to assist their arboreal habits. Trees need to be of a sufficient age to provide hollows for nesting in limbs or logs, and grass trees need to have ample skirts to provide cover (DEC 2007). Remnant Red-tailed Phascogale populations have predominantly survived in areas dominated by dense Rock Sheoak (Allocasuarina huegeliana) woodland associated with Wandoo (Eucalyptus wandoo). Fire causes high mortality amongst resident Red-tailed Phascogales (Friend & Friend 1993) and populations do not recover for years after fire events (DEC 2007).

During bush fires, Red-tailed Phascogales use tree hollows above the height of flames for protection (DEC 2007).

Red-tailed Phascogales reach sexual maturity by May/June. This species exhibits an annual male die-off, where, after the winter mating period, all males die witihin one month of mating (Bradley 1998). Males live to to 11.5, while females live up to 36 months and can reproduce two or three times (Bradley 1987, 1990, 1997, 1998; Foster et al. 2006).

Research by Bradley (1990) has shown that male mortality follows acute haemorrhage of gastrointestinal ulcers. Leading up to and including the breeding season, males are under persistently high levels of stress caused by physiological changes, resulting in ulcers.

Gestation period is 28–30 days after which the female can give birth to 13 young but only a litter of six to eight are reared per year (as only 8 teats are available). Some females also breed in their second or third year (Bradley 1997). Young Red-tailed Phascogales are born in August. Recorded nesting sites include hollow logs, tree hollows (Bradley 1997; Kitchener 1981), and the skirts and stumps of Grass Trees (Xanthorrhoea spp.) (Maxwell et al. 1996).

From August to October the young remain dependent upon the mother but, by the end of summer, they have been weaned and disperse to set up their own home ranges. When females are pregnant, their social behaviour changes and they become quite aggressive towards males (Bradley 1990).

It has been hypothesised (DEC 2007) that inland populations of Red-tailed Phascogales may have a less well defined breeding/distribution season than their western counterparts based on:

  • a generally later annual cycle
  • a cycle in response to rainfall patterns.

Friend and Scanlon (1996) found a close correlation between Red-tailed Phascogale numbers in autumn and total rainfall the previous year. They found that during dry years there is a high juvenile mortality and, as females live for a maximum of only three years, several consecutive dry seasons could increase the risk of local extinction.

The Red-tailed Phascogale is an opportunistic predator. They generally move to the ground to feed on a wide range of insects and spiders, with a preference for those less than 10 mm in length (Bradley 1998). They also consume small birds and mammals. Stomach contents taken from 26 animals included at least nine arthropod Orders; the hair of mice (Mus musculus); rabbit kittens; and one feather (Kitchener 1981). Kitchener (1981) states that they do not need to drink even during periods of extreme drought.

The remnant populations of Red-tailed Phascogales have a strong association with Gastrolobium species bearing sodium monofluoroacetate (1080) (Kitchener 1981). This is a naturally occurring toxin to which introduced animals, such as sheep and cows, have no tolerance. The presence of this toxin in plants within reserves, has potentially protected the Red-tailed Phascogale from competition from grazing and browsing by introduced animals (DEC 2007).

Although Red-tailed Phascogales are arboreal, observations of their diet noted in Kitchener (1981) suggests that they forage extensively on the ground, and as such would be susceptible to ground dwelling predators.

Calculations of the distance moved between captures indicate that males move on average between three to four times as far as females, with the disparity being greatest during the mating season in July (Bradley 1997).

The Red-tailed Phascogale is nocturnal and arboreal, moving about the tree canopy, and able to leap up to 2 m (DEC 2007).

Home ranges vary from 1.5 ha to 8 ha, depending on the breeding season (DEC 2007).

Red-tailed Phascogales are shy and not readily seen in their natural environment (DEC 2007).

The species is best surveyed using medium Elliott traps or aluminium box traps set overnight.

Traps should be placed on the ground and baited with a mixture of peanut butter, rolled oats and sardines, and set for three consecutive nights. Friend and colleagues (1994) suggest monitoring between February and mid-June, as male Red-tailed Phascogales die-off in July. Additionally, although juveniles are independent by late October, few first-year individuals are caught in Elliott traps before February. A grid interval of 40 m between traps has been used in past studies (Friend et al. 1994).

Red-tailed Phascogales are best trapped during fine weather. However, if rain threatens, each trap should be placed in a plastic bag (open at the trap door) or wrapped in plastic clingwrap to reduce the risk of cold trauma to captive animals.

Friend and colleagues (1994) achieved greater success by baiting traps and locking them open three to four days before the trapping session and then re-baiting. This led to a higher trap success in a single night of trapping than conventional methods.

When trapping in areas where there is a high occurrence of the Common Brush-tailed Possum (Trichosurus vulpecula) or Brush-tailed Bettong (Bettongia penicillata) it is recommended that cage traps (Sheffield wire cage traps) should be set to reduce the amount of interference by these species with the Elliot traps.

In the past, the main threat to Red-tailed Phascogales has been the clearing of their habitat for agriculture and associated development, combined with the introduction of the fox in the 1930s. Changed fire regimes, cats and foxes are the major current threats to this species (Bradley 1998; Foster et al. 2006; Maxwell et al. 1996). There is evidence that Red-tailed Phascogale populations have responded positively to fox control (Friend & Scanlon 1999).

Cats
Cats are a considerable threat to the Red-tailed Phascogale. They are able to hunt this species both on the ground and in the trees, and can have a significant impact on a population (DEC 2007; Foster et al. 2006; Friend et al. 1994).

Foxes
Foxes are a threat to the Red-tailed Phascogale when they are on the ground but, as they are primarily arboreal, they can escape provided they are near trees. Thus, they are most at risk from foxes if they have to move to the ground, for example to disperse across cleared farmland, or post-fire when the canopy is destroyed (DEC 2007).

Fire
Since European settlement, fire regimes have changed, in particular fire frequency. This has changed the vegetation composition which has, in turn, affected the available habitat for the Red-tailed Phascogale (DEC 2007; Foster et al. 2006). Red-tailed Phascogales prefer unburnt vegetation that provides continuous canopy to assist their arboreal habits, trees of sufficient age to provide hollows for nesting in limbs or logs, and grass trees with ample skirts (DEC 2007). Remnant Red-tailed Phascogale populations have predominantly survived in areas dominated by dense Sheoak woodland associated with Wandoo. Fire causes high mortality amongst resident Red-tailed Phascogales (Friend & Friend 1993) and renders the landscape unsuitable as habitat for years after a fire.

Habitat Degradation
Habitat loss and fragmentation associated with clearing for development and agriculture as well as changed fire regimes are the main factor in limiting the possibility of recolonisation from adjacent areas (DEC 2007; Foster et al. 2006).

Other
Predicted climate change will probably result in elevated threat potential (Brereton et al. 1995).

Between 1975 and 1996, Western Australian Water Corporation gauging has shown that rainfall decreased by 14% and runoff into Perth dams decreased by 48%. Since 1997, rainfall had declined by 21% and the runoff has decreased by 64%. Between 2001 and 2005, rainfall was 36% less and runoff 88% less (McFarlane 2005). These declines in rainfall and runoff are likely to have a detrimental impact on the Red-tailed Phascogale as fire frequencies may increase due to increasing aridity, affecting both habitat and food supply (DEC 2007).

Road kills have a localised impact where populations occur in close proximity to roads (DEC 2007).

Maxwell and colleagues (1996) suggested the following additional studies would be required for recovery objectives and actions to be defined:

  • determine effects of fox control on populations
  • study the effect of cat control on populations.

They also outlined the following recovery objectives:

  • determine suitable management regimes
  • retain current distribution and abundance
  • increase abundance (and range) by reintroduction to suitable large conservation reserves.

Management actions completed or under way:

  • Study into effects of fox control (1993–1998; funded to end of 1996, baiting commenced in late 1994). This was undertaken by the then Department of Conservation and Land Management (now Department of Environment and Conservation).

Management actions required:

  • Habitat management on DEC-managed land, targeting Allocasuarina heugeliana - Eucalyptus wandoo association.

The following projects have received Government funding grants for conservation and recovery work benefiting the Red-tailed Phascogale:

  • The Wadderin Committee received $10 518 through the Threatened Species Network Community Grants in 2007–2008. This project will complete the fencing, eliminate foxes and feral cats, and complete preparations for the first reintroduction of the endangered Red-tailed Phascogale into the Wadderin Sanctuary.
  • Wagin Woodanilling Landcare Zone (Western Australia) received $5000 through the Threatened Species Network Community Grants in 2006–2007 for building an understanding of the ecology of the Red-tailed Phascogale, to improve the ability to identify and link high-quality habitat; comparison of populations to provide new insight into distribution and habitat requirements through survey; and assistance with regeneration of habitat.
  • King-Murray Rocks Catchment Group (Western Australia) received $20 000 through the Threatened Species Network Community Grants in 2001–2002 for ensuring long-term survival of this species by preventing predation, habitat loss and fragmentation, and incorporation of species' targets into broader catchment planning programs.
  • Newdegate Land Conservation District Committee (Western Australia) received $2500 through the Threatened Species Network Community Grants in 2001–2002, part of which was for a fox-bating program aimed at protecting populations of this species, and the creation of awareness and encouragement for landholders to continue fox-baiting.

The following resources contain information regarding the Red-tailed Phascogale:

  • Bradley, A.J. (1987). Stress and mortality in the Red-tailed phascogale, Phascogale calura (Marsupialia: Dasyuridae).
  • Bradley, A.J. (1990). Seasonal effects on the haemotology and blood chemistry in the Red-tailed phascogale, Phascogale calura (Marsupialia: Dasyuridae).
  • Bradley, A.J. (1990a). Failure of glucocorticoid feedback during breeding in the male red-tailed phascogale Phascogale calura (Marsupialia: Dasyuridae).
  • Bradley, A.J. (1997). Reproduction and life history in the red-tailed phascogale, Phascogale calura (Marsupialia: Dasyuridae): the adaptive-stress senescence hypothesis
  • Bradley, A.J. (1998). Red-tailed Phascogale.
  • Friend, T. & G. Friend (1993). Conservation of the red-tailed phascogale (located in Dryandra Woodland, Tutanning Nature Reserve and the eastern block of Boyagin Nature Reserve).
  • Friend, J.A., M.D. Scanlon & K. Himbeck (1994). An assessment of the effect of fox control on populations of the red-tailed phascogale.
  • Friend, J.A. & M.D. Scanlon (1996). An assessment of the effect of fox control on populations of the red-tailed phascogale.
  • Green, B., D. King & A.J. Bradley (1989). Water and Energy Metabolism and Estimated Food Consumption Rates of Free-Living Wambengers, Phascogale calura (Marsupialia: Dasyuridae).
  • Himbeck, K. & C. Sims (2004). Translocation proposal (revised): Translocation of red-tailed phascogale (Phascogale calura Gould, 1844) from several wheatbelt reserves to Francois Peron National Park (FPNP).
  • Kitchener, D.J. (1981). Breeding, Diet and habitat preference of Phascogale calura (Gould 1844) (Marsupialia: Dasyyuridae) in the southern wheatbelt, Western Australia.

The Red-tailed Phascogale is listed in The Action Plan for Australian Marsupials and Monotremes (Maxwell et al. 1996).

The following table lists known and perceived threats to this species. Threats are based on the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN) threat classification version 1.1.

Threat Class Threatening Species References
Agriculture and Aquaculture:Agriculture and Aquaculture:Land clearing, habitat fragmentation and/or habitat degradation Red-tailed phascogale. In: Strahan, R., ed. The Mammals of Australia. Page(s) 102-103. (Bradley, A.J., 1995) [Book].
Phascogale calura in Species Profile and Threats (SPRAT) database (Department of the Environment and Heritage, 2006tf) [Internet].
The Implications of Climate Change for Land-based Nature Conservation Strategies (Pouliquen-Young, O. & P. Newman, 1999) [Report].
Agriculture and Aquaculture:Livestock Farming and Grazing:Habitat loss and modification due to clearance of native vegetation and pasture improvements The Impact of Global Warming on the Distribution of Threatened Vertebrates (ANZECC 1991) (Dexter, E.M., A.D. Chapman & J.R. Busby, 1995) [Report].
Ecosystem/Community Stresses:Indirect Ecosystem Effects:Loss and/or fragmentation of habitat and/or subpopulations Phascogale calura in Species Profile and Threats (SPRAT) database (Department of the Environment and Heritage, 2006tf) [Internet].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive Non-Native/Alien Species:Competition and/or predation Vulpes vulpes (Red Fox, Fox) Red-tailed phascogale. In: Strahan, R., ed. The Mammals of Australia. Page(s) 102-103. (Bradley, A.J., 1995) [Book].
Phascogale calura in Species Profile and Threats (SPRAT) database (Department of the Environment and Heritage, 2006tf) [Internet].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive Non-Native/Alien Species:Competition and/or predation Felis catus (Cat, House Cat, Domestic Cat) Red-tailed phascogale. In: Strahan, R., ed. The Mammals of Australia. Page(s) 102-103. (Bradley, A.J., 1995) [Book].
Phascogale calura in Species Profile and Threats (SPRAT) database (Department of the Environment and Heritage, 2006tf) [Internet].
Natural System Modifications:Fire and Fire Suppression:Inappropriate and/or changed fire regimes (frequency, timing, intensity) Phascogale calura in Species Profile and Threats (SPRAT) database (Department of the Environment and Heritage, 2006tf) [Internet].
Natural System Modifications:Fire and Fire Suppression:Inappropriate prescribed regimes and/or vegetation management to control fire regimes Red-tailed phascogale. In: Strahan, R., ed. The Mammals of Australia. Page(s) 102-103. (Bradley, A.J., 1995) [Book].

Bradley, A.J. (1987). Stress and mortality in the red-tailed phascogale, Phascogale calura (Marsupialia: Dasyuridae). General and Comparative Endocrinology. 67:85-100.

Bradley, A.J. (1990). Seasonal effects on the haematology and blood chemistry in the red-tailed phascogale, Phascogale calura (Marsupialia: Dasyuridae). Australian Journal of Zoology. 37:533-543.

Bradley, A.J. (1990a). Failure of glucocorticoid feedback during breeding in the male red-tailed phascogale Phascogale calura (Marsupialia: Dasyuridae). Journal of Steroid Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. 37(1):155-163.

Bradley, A.J. (1997). Reproduction and life history in the red-tailed phascogale, Phascogale calura (Marsupialia: Dasyuridae): the adaptive-stress senescence hypothesis. Journal of Zoology (London). 241:739-755.

Bradley, A.J. (1998). Red-tailed Phascogale. In: Strahan, R., ed. The Mammals of Australia, Second Edition, Revised. Page(s) 102-103. Sydney: New Holland Publishers.

Brereton, R., S. Bennett & I. Mansergh (1995). Enhanced greenhouse climate change and its potential effect on selected fauna of south-eastern Australia: A trend analysis. Biological Conservation. 72:339-354.

Cronin, L. (1991). Key Guide to Australian Mammals. Balgowlah, NSW: Reed Books.

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This database is designed to provide statutory, biological and ecological information on species and ecological communities, migratory species, marine species, and species and species products subject to international trade and commercial use protected under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (the EPBC Act). It has been compiled from a range of sources including listing advice, recovery plans, published literature and individual experts. While reasonable efforts have been made to ensure the accuracy of the information, no guarantee is given, nor responsibility taken, by the Commonwealth for its accuracy, currency or completeness. The Commonwealth does not accept any responsibility for any loss or damage that may be occasioned directly or indirectly through the use of, or reliance on, the information contained in this database. The information contained in this database does not necessarily represent the views of the Commonwealth. This database is not intended to be a complete source of information on the matters it deals with. Individuals and organisations should consider all the available information, including that available from other sources, in deciding whether there is a need to make a referral or apply for a permit or exemption under the EPBC Act.

Citation: Department of the Environment (2014). Phascogale calura in Species Profile and Threats Database, Department of the Environment, Canberra. Available from: http://www.environment.gov.au/sprat. Accessed Fri, 25 Apr 2014 16:13:18 +1000.