Biodiversity

Species Profile and Threats Database


For information to assist proponents in referral, environmental assessments and compliance issues, refer to the Policy Statements and Guidelines (where available), the Conservation Advice (where available) or the Listing Advice (where available).
 
In addition, proponents and land managers should refer to the Recovery Plan (where available) or the Conservation Advice (where available) for recovery, mitigation and conservation information.

EPBC Act Listing Status Listed as Vulnerable as Cupaniopsis shirleyana
Listing and Conservation Advices Commonwealth Conservation Advice on Cupaniopsis shirleyana (Wedge-leaf Tuckeroo) (Threatened Species Scientific Committee, 2008f) [Conservation Advice].
 
Recovery Plan Decision Recovery Plan not required, included on the Not Commenced List (1/11/2009).
 
Adopted/Made Recovery Plans
Federal Register of
    Legislative Instruments
Declaration under s178, s181, and s183 of the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 - List of threatened species, List of threatened ecological communities and List of threatening processes (Commonwealth of Australia, 2000) [Legislative Instrument] as Cupaniopsis shirleyana.
 
State Listing Status
QLD: Listed as Vulnerable (Nature Conservation Act 1992 (Queensland): May 2014 list) as Cupaniopsis shirleyana
Scientific name Cupaniopsis shirleyana [3205]
Family Sapindaceae:Sapindales:Magnoliopsida:Magnoliophyta:Plantae
Species author (Bailey) Radlk.
Infraspecies author  
Reference Repertorium Specierum Novarum Regni Vegetabilis 20 (30 Jun. 1924) 32.
Other names Cupania shirleyana [42954]
Distribution map Species Distribution Map

This is an indicative distribution map of the present distribution of the species based on best available knowledge. See map caveat for more information.

Illustrations Google Images

Scientific name: Cupaniopsis shirleyana

Common name: Wedge-leaf Tuckeroo, Kooraloo

The Wedge-leaf Tuckeroo is a small to medium sized tree, growing to 10 m tall. The species has alternately pinnate leaves, which are glossy green and hairy on the underside, particularly along the leaf veins. Juvenile leaves often have rust-coloured hairs and are prominently toothed.

Flowers are greenish-cream in colour, small and hairy and arranged on an inflorescence that is 5—18 cm long and slender.

The fruits are orange capsules that are spherical to obovate (egg-shaped) in cross-section, with 2 or 3 lobes. The fruits also have fine hairs on the outer surface and long, soft hairs on the inner surface. The seeds within are brown and covered with an orange-red seed coat (Barry & Thomas 1994; Stanley & Ross 1983).

The Wedge-leaf Tuckeroo is distributed on a stretch of the Queensland coast, extending from Mt Larcom in the north to Brisbane in the south. Between these points, the species occurs from the coast to Mt Perry in the west. This is a distribution of approximately 450 km (TSSC 2008f).

The Wedge-leaf Tuckeroo has been grown in the Brisbane Botanic Gardens and at Tondoon Botanic Gardens in Gladstone (Barry & Thomas 1994). This species is also known to be able to be successfully translocated (Williams 2003a). However, no published information has been found on the best management practices for translocation. They are known to propagate best from freshly harvested seed (Williams 2003a).

The Wedge-leaf Tuckeroo was surveyed by Barry and Thomas in 1994, as part of their survey of Threatened Vascular Rainforest Plants of south-east Queensland. The data obtained during these surveys has resulted in more detailed knowledge of population locations and abundance.

The Wedge-leaf Tuckero occurs as a number of small populations which are mainly restricted to specific habitats throughout its range (Thomas & McDonald 1989). The following is a list of recorded sites with year recorded, where possible, and references cited. The current status of many of these populations has not been assessed.

Region

Location

Year Recorded

Reference

Northern Locations

Baffle Creek district

1920

Reynolds (1984)

East of Miriam Vale:

Eurumbula Holding

1970

Reynolds (1984)

Mount Larcom Range *

Pre-2005

Barry & Thomas (1994), EPA (2005a)

South of Mount Larcom

Pre-2009

Connel Hatch (2009)

Rodds Peninsula - Eurimbula - Round Hill Head - Baffle Creek

Pre-2004

Barry & Martin (2004)

Deepwater

Pre-2004

Barry & Martin (2004)

Bulburin - Warro - Bania

Pre-2004

Barry & Martin (2004)

Curtis Island *

Pre-1994

Barry & Thomas (1994)

Turkey Beach east of Miriam Vale

1981

Barry & Thomas (1994)

Mount Colosseum National Park *

Pre-1994 

Barry & Thomas (1994)

State Forest 86 Eurimbula

1970

Barry & Thomas (1994)

Eurimbula National Park *

Pre-1994 

Barry & Thomas (1994)

Rodds Peninsula National Park *

Pre-1994 

Barry & Thomas (1994)

Bottle Creek Conservation Park *

Pre-1994 

Barry & Thomas (1994)

Round Hill National Park, Uxbridge, west of Agnes Waters *

Pre-1994 

Barry & Thomas (1994)

Bulburin State Forest, Bompa *

Pre-1994 

Barry & Thomas (1994)

Bulburin State Forest, Granite Creek

1957 & 1982

Barry & Thomas (1994)

Central Locations

Rachel Hill Nature Refuge

Pre-1994

Qld Nature Conservation (Protected Areas) Regulation 1994

Waluma Nature Reserve

Pre-1994

Qld Nature Conservation (Protected Areas) Regulation 1994

Yandaran Creek, Bundaberg district

Pre-1984

Reynolds (1984)

Cedars Bridge Crossing on Burnett River, 5 km south of South Kolan

1972

Reynolds (1984)

Bingera

1948

Reynolds (1984)

Dry rainforest communities around Cordalba and Childers

Pre-2000

Barry (2000)

Littabella - Monduran

Pre-2004

Barry & Martin (2004)

Mon Repos Pasturage Reserve

Pre-2004

Barry & Martin (2004)

Bundaberg Creek and Western Gully - Greatheads Road, Bundaberg

Pre-2004

Saunders Havill Group (2006, 2007)

Bullyard Creek Conservation Park, Gin Gin *

Pre-1994

Barry & Thomas (1994)

Booyal, Goodnight State Forest

1982

Barry & Thomas (1994)

Booyal, Causeway Road

Pre-1994

Barry & Thomas (1994)

Mullet Creek

1925

Barry & Thomas (1994)

Norville Park, north of Bundaberg

1983

Barry & Thomas (1994)

The Hummock, near Bundaberg

1938

Barry & Thomas (1994)

Burnett Range, Wide Bay

1978

Barry & Thomas (1994)

State Forest east of Monduran Dam

1989

Barry & Thomas (1994)

Southern Locations

Pine Mountain, Sankey's Scrub, Brisbane


1943, 1987 & 1988, pre-2006

Saunders Havill Group (2006), Barry & Thomas (1994), Gasteen & Petter (2006)

White's Hill Reserve east of Brisbane

Pre-2006

Gasteen & Petter (2006)

State Forest 301 and 420, Miva *

Pre-1994

Barry & Thomas (1994)

Cold Creek State Forest

1988

Barry & Thomas (1994)

The populations in the table above marked with an asterisk (*) are considered to be important populations (Barry & Thomas 1994). The total population of these important populations was estimated to be in the several hundreds, if not thousands of individuals (Barry & Thomas 1994).

The population off Greatheads Road in Bundaberg has been estimated as having more than 1750 individuals in the core area of Bundaberg Creek and another 269 specimens in the Western Gully (Saunders Havill Group 2006). South of Mount Larcom, a number of stands were identified as having a minumum population of 685 (Connell Hatch 2009).

A number of surveys carried out by Barry and Thomas (1994) identified several significant populations of the Wedge-leaf Tuckeroo within a number of secure conservation reserves, including Mount Colosseum National Park, Round Hill National Park, Eurimbula National Park, Rodds Peninsula National Park, Bottle Creek Conservation Park and Bullyard Creek Conservation Park.

Significant populations were also recorded from Bulburin State Forest at Bompa, State Forest 301 and 420 at Miva, Curtis Island and Mount Larcom Range (Barry & Thomas 1994).

The Wedge-leaf Tuckeroo occurs in a variety of dry rainforest vegetation types, including vine thicket communities on hillsides, stream beds and along riverbanks at altitudes up to 550 m above sea level. This species is also likely to occur on the margins of native vegetation in scrubby urbanised areas (Thomas & McDonald 1989).

The Wedge-leaf Tuckeroo is predominately found on dark brown sandy loams and sandy clay loams (pH 5-7.5) and rocky scree slopes. Generally, these soils have formed from volcanic parent materials (mainly granites and granodiorites, basalt and andesitic flows, and pyroclastics) (Barry & Thomas 1994).

Sites where the species has been found are mostly simple microphyll closed forests to tall closed forest, often with Hoop Pine (Araucaria cunninghamii) emergents. There are a few sites which support a more moist rainforest ecosystem known as 'simple notophyll vineforest'. Some commonly associated tree and shrub species also found at the sites are as follows: Ailanthus triphysa, Alchornea ilicifolia, Aphananthe philippinensis, Araucaria cunninghamii, Archidendropsis thozetiana, Argyrodendron trifoliatum, Atalaya multiflora, Austromyrtus bidwillii, Baloghia inophylla, Barklya syringifolia, Bosistoa transversa, Bouchardatia neurococca, Croton acronychioides, Cryptocarya triplinervis, Dendrocnide photinophylla, Diospyros australis, Disiliaria muelleri, Drypetes deplanchei, Elaeocarpus obovatus, Fitzalania heteropetala, Planchonella laurifolia, P. myrsinoides, Pleiogynium timorense, Sterculia quadrifida and Strychnos axillaris (Barry & Thomas 1994).

The distribution of the Wedge-leaf Tuckero is also known to overlap with the following EPBC Act listed threatened ecological communities: Brigalow (Acacia harpophylla) (dominant and co-dominant) and Semi-evergreen vine thickets of the Brigalow Belt (North and South) and Nandewar Bioregions.

The Wedge-leaf Tuckeroo flowers from April to June. Frugivorous (fruit-eating) birds and animals are likely to consume the fruit, which are thought to ripen in late June (Barry & Thomas 1994; Williams 2003a).

The main threats to the Wedge-leaf Tuckeroo are clearing and disturbance from activities such as roadworks and other infrastructure works, including drainage works.

In addition to direct removal or damage, clearing can promote canopy gaps, which promote the colonisation and growth of weed species, such as Lantana (Lantana camara) (TSSC 2008f). Stock trampling, grazing and inappropriate fire regimes are also suspected to pose a threat to the species (TSSC 2008f).

A number of actions that are designed to promote the recovery of the Wedge-leaf Tuckeroo are outlined in the Conservation Advice for the Wedge-leaf Tuckeroo (TSSC 2008f). Some of these actions are:

  • undertake survey work in suitable habitat and potential habitat to locate any additional populations or occurrences.
  • asess population size, distribution, ecological requirements and the relative impacts of threatening processes.
  • identify any additional populations of conservation priority.
  • manage changes in hydrology and surface water flows.
  • develop and implement a suitable fire management strategy for the Wedge-leaf Tuckeroo.
  • raise awareness about the Wedge-leaf Tuckeroo in the local community.
  • undertake appropriate seed collection and storage.
  • undertake seed germination/propagation trials to enhance the likelihood of successful establishment.
  • prevent grazing pressure at known sites on leased crown land through exclusion fencing or other barriers.

Documents relevant to the management of the Wedge-leaf Tuckeroo can be found at the start of the profile.

The following table lists known and perceived threats to this species. Threats are based on the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN) threat classification version 1.1.

Threat Class Threatening Species References
Agriculture and Aquaculture:Livestock Farming and Grazing:Grazing pressures and associated habitat changes National recovery plan for the Isis Tamarind (Alectryon ramiflorus) 2003-2007 (Barker, M. & S. Barry, 2003) [Recovery Plan].
Agriculture and Aquaculture:Livestock Farming and Grazing:Habitat alteration (vegetation, soil, hydrology) due to trampling and grazing by livestock National recovery plan for the Isis Tamarind (Alectryon ramiflorus) 2003-2007 (Barker, M. & S. Barry, 2003) [Recovery Plan].
Climate Change and Severe Weather:Droughts:Drought National recovery plan for the Isis Tamarind (Alectryon ramiflorus) 2003-2007 (Barker, M. & S. Barry, 2003) [Recovery Plan].
Ecosystem/Community Stresses:Ecosystem Degradation:Wind damage National recovery plan for the Isis Tamarind (Alectryon ramiflorus) 2003-2007 (Barker, M. & S. Barry, 2003) [Recovery Plan].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive Non-Native/Alien Species:Competition and/or habitat degradation Bryophyllum tubiflorum (Mother-of-millions) National recovery plan for the Isis Tamarind (Alectryon ramiflorus) 2003-2007 (Barker, M. & S. Barry, 2003) [Recovery Plan].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive Non-Native/Alien Species:Competition and/or habitat degradation Lantana camara (Lantana, Common Lantana, Kamara Lantana, Large-leaf Lantana, Pink Flowered Lantana, Red Flowered Lantana, Red-Flowered Sage, White Sage, Wild Sage) National recovery plan for the Isis Tamarind (Alectryon ramiflorus) 2003-2007 (Barker, M. & S. Barry, 2003) [Recovery Plan].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive Non-Native/Alien Species:Competition and/or habitat degradation Panicum maximum (Guinea Grass, Green Panic, Hamil Grass) National recovery plan for the Isis Tamarind (Alectryon ramiflorus) 2003-2007 (Barker, M. & S. Barry, 2003) [Recovery Plan].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive Non-Native/Alien Species:Competition and/or habitat degradation by weeds Commonwealth Conservation Advice on Cupaniopsis shirleyana (Wedge-leaf Tuckeroo) (Threatened Species Scientific Committee, 2008f) [Conservation Advice].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Predation, competition, habitat degradation and/or spread of pathogens by introduced species National recovery plan for the Isis Tamarind (Alectryon ramiflorus) 2003-2007 (Barker, M. & S. Barry, 2003) [Recovery Plan].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Problematic Native Species:Competition, predation and/or habitat degradation by kangaroos and wallabies National recovery plan for the Isis Tamarind (Alectryon ramiflorus) 2003-2007 (Barker, M. & S. Barry, 2003) [Recovery Plan].
Natural System Modifications:Dams and Water Management/Use:Changes in hydrology including habitat drainage Commonwealth Conservation Advice on Cupaniopsis shirleyana (Wedge-leaf Tuckeroo) (Threatened Species Scientific Committee, 2008f) [Conservation Advice].
Natural System Modifications:Fire and Fire Suppression:Inappropriate and/or changed fire regimes (frequency, timing, intensity) National recovery plan for the Isis Tamarind (Alectryon ramiflorus) 2003-2007 (Barker, M. & S. Barry, 2003) [Recovery Plan].
Species Stresses:Indirect Species Effects:Low fecundity, reproductive rate and/or poor recruitment National recovery plan for the Isis Tamarind (Alectryon ramiflorus) 2003-2007 (Barker, M. & S. Barry, 2003) [Recovery Plan].
Species Stresses:Indirect Species Effects:Low genetic diversity and genetic inbreeding National recovery plan for the Isis Tamarind (Alectryon ramiflorus) 2003-2007 (Barker, M. & S. Barry, 2003) [Recovery Plan].
Species Stresses:Indirect Species Effects:Low numbers of individuals National recovery plan for the Isis Tamarind (Alectryon ramiflorus) 2003-2007 (Barker, M. & S. Barry, 2003) [Recovery Plan].
Transportation and Service Corridors:Roads and Railroads:Development and/or maintenance of roads National recovery plan for the Isis Tamarind (Alectryon ramiflorus) 2003-2007 (Barker, M. & S. Barry, 2003) [Recovery Plan].

Barry, S.J. (2000). Recovery plan for the endangered vascular plant Alectryon ramiflorus Reynolds. [Online]. Brisbane: Environmental Protection Agency. Available from: http://www.environment.gov.au/biodiversity/threatened/publications/recovery/a-ramiflorus/index.html.

Barry, S.J. & G. Martin (2004). Burnett Mary Region Terrestrial Biodiversity Technical Paper - Appendices. [Online]. Available from: http://www.burnettmarynrm.org.au/downloads/General_Reports/TerrestrailBiodAppen1_6.pdf.

Barry, S.J. & G.T. Thomas (1994). Threatened Vascular Rainforest Plants of South-east Queensland: A Conservation Review. Queensland Department of Environment and Heritage.

Connell Hatch (2009). Aldoga Bank Deviation. Environment Protection and Biodiversity. Conservation Act 1999 Referral Form. QR Limited. Reference H328443-ABD-EV00-03. Revision 4. Spring Hill, Queensland: Connell Hatch.

Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (2005a). The Curtis Coast Regional Coastal Management Plan (Curtis Coastal Plan). The State of Queensland, Environmental Protection Agency, viewed 28th June 2006, http://www.epa.qld.gov.au/register/p00528ad.pdf. The Curtis Coast Regional Coastal Management Plan. [Online]. Available from: http://www.epa.qld.gov.au/register/p00528ad.pdf.

Gasteen, D. & M. Petter (2006). Recovery Plan for White's Hill/ Pine Mt Reserve. Viewed 30 March 2006. Recovery Plan for White's Hill/ Pine Mt Reserve. [Online]. Brisbane Region Environment Council, Whites Hill Pine Mtn Community Group. Available from: http://brec.ozecol.org/news/current/WHPMREC2.html#Recovery%20Plan%20Introduction.

Reynolds, S.T. (1984). Notes on Sapindaceae, III. Austrobaileya. 2(1):29-64.

Saunders Havill Group (2006). Detailed Cupaniopsis shirleyana (Wedge-leaf Tuckeroo) Map - Lot 2 on RP162775 Greatheads Road, Bundaberg QLD. Prepared by Saunders Havill Group, Bowen Hills, Qld, for Santalucia Corporation.

Saunders Havill Group (2007). Vegetation Assessment Report- Lot 4 on RP807703. Greathead Road, Ashfield, Bundaberg. Queensland: Saunders Havill Group, Bowen Hills, Qld for Shialand Pty Ltd.

Stanley, T.D. & E.M. Ross (1983). Flora of south-eastern Queensland. Volume One. Brisbane, Queensland: Department of Primary Industries.

Thomas, M B & McDonald W J F (1989). Rare and Threatened Plants of Queensland. Dept. of Primary Industries, Qld Government.

Threatened Species Scientific Committee (2008f). Commonwealth Conservation Advice on Cupaniopsis shirleyana (Wedge-leaf Tuckeroo). [Online]. Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts. Available from: http://www.environment.gov.au/biodiversity/threatened/species/pubs/3205-conservation-advice.pdf.

Williams, B. (2003a). Brisbane Rainforest Action & Information Network. Viewed March 2006. [Online]. Available from: http://www.brisrain.webcentral.com.au/old%5Fsite/database/Cupan_shirleyana.htm.

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This database is designed to provide statutory, biological and ecological information on species and ecological communities, migratory species, marine species, and species and species products subject to international trade and commercial use protected under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (the EPBC Act). It has been compiled from a range of sources including listing advice, recovery plans, published literature and individual experts. While reasonable efforts have been made to ensure the accuracy of the information, no guarantee is given, nor responsibility taken, by the Commonwealth for its accuracy, currency or completeness. The Commonwealth does not accept any responsibility for any loss or damage that may be occasioned directly or indirectly through the use of, or reliance on, the information contained in this database. The information contained in this database does not necessarily represent the views of the Commonwealth. This database is not intended to be a complete source of information on the matters it deals with. Individuals and organisations should consider all the available information, including that available from other sources, in deciding whether there is a need to make a referral or apply for a permit or exemption under the EPBC Act.

Citation: Department of the Environment (2014). Cupaniopsis shirleyana in Species Profile and Threats Database, Department of the Environment, Canberra. Available from: http://www.environment.gov.au/sprat. Accessed Wed, 17 Sep 2014 11:28:03 +1000.