Biodiversity

Species Profile and Threats Database


For information to assist proponents in referral, environmental assessments and compliance issues, refer to the Policy Statements and Guidelines (where available), the Conservation Advice (where available) or the Listing Advice (where available).
 
In addition, proponents and land managers should refer to the Recovery Plan (where available) or the Conservation Advice (where available) for recovery, mitigation and conservation information.

EPBC Act Listing Status Listed as Vulnerable
Recovery Plan Decision Recovery Plan required, this species had a recovery plan in force at the time the legislation provided for the Minister to decide whether or not to have a recovery plan (19/2/2007).
 
Adopted/Made Recovery Plans National Multi-species Recovery Plan for the Carpentarian Antechinus Pseudantechinus mimulus, Butler's Dunnart Sminthopsis butleri and Northern Hopping-mouse Notomys aquilo, 2004 - 2009 (Woinarski, J.C.Z., 2004) [Recovery Plan].
 
Policy Statements and Guidelines Survey guidelines for Australia's threatened mammals. EPBC Act survey guidelines 6.5 (Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities (DSEWPaC), 2011j) [Admin Guideline].
 
Federal Register of
    Legislative Instruments
Declaration under s178, s181, and s183 of the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 - List of threatened species, List of threatened ecological communities and List of threatening processes (Commonwealth of Australia, 2000) [Legislative Instrument].
 
State Government
    Documents and Websites
NT:Threatened Species of the Northern Territory-Carpentarian Antechinus Pseudantechinus mimulus (Woinarski, J. & S. Ward, 2006s) [Information Sheet].
Non-statutory Listing Status
IUCN: Listed as Endangered (Global Status: IUCN Red List of Threatened Species: 2013.1 list)
Scientific name Pseudantechinus mimulus [59283]
Family Dasyuridae:Polyprotodonta:Mammalia:Chordata:Animalia
Species author (Thomas,1906)
Infraspecies author  
Reference  
Distribution map Species Distribution Map

This is an indicative distribution map of the present distribution of the species based on best available knowledge. See map caveat for more information.

Illustrations Google Images

Museum specimens of the Carpentarian Antechinus may have been incorrectly identified as the Fat-tailed Antechinus (Pseudantechinus macdonnellensis) (Woolley 2011).

The Carpentarian Antechinus is a small, carnivorous marsupial with brown fur, a reddish patch behind the ears and a white underside. Body length is 70–90 mm, tail length is 60–75 mm and weight is 15–25 g (Curtis et al. 2012; Strahan 1998). Males are smaller than females. Species in the genus Pseudantechinus store fat in their tail, and this becomes carrot-shaped when food is plentiful (Woinarski 2004).

The Carpentarian Antechinus occurs in the Sir Edward Pellew Group of islands (Centre, North, South-west and Vanderlin Islands) in the NT (Curtis et al. 2012; Kitchener 1991), the Pungalina-Seven Emu area on the mainland in the NT (NT Government 2011), along the Selwyn Range south of Cloncurry in Queensland (BAAM 2011; Lloyd et al. 2013) and on a number ridges around Mt Isa in Queensland (BAAM 2011; Lloyd et al. 2013; Woolley 2011). The species was originally collected on Alexandria Station in the NT, in 1905, but has not been recorded there since (Maxwell et al. 1996).

The extent of occurrence of the Carpentarian Antechinus is 16 000 km² (Curtis et al. 2012).

The targeted assessment for the Copper String Environment Impact Statement (EIS) involved a 10 day habitat assessment survey that preceded four trapping surveys (BAAM 2011). The habitat assessment was used to select the most suitable sites for four 5-day trapping surveys. The trapping records, together with the previous records in the vicinity of the study area (Woolley 2011), were incorporated into the habitat mapping methodology to map known important habitat and potential habitat for the species within the study area (BAAM 2011).

The total population size is unknown (Curtis et al. 2012).

The Carpentarian Antechinus occurs at Pungalina-Seven Emu, which is an Australian Wildlife Conservancy property.

The Carpentarian Antechinus has been recorded in rocky areas and nearby woodland. In central Queensland it has been found on sandstone, granite, metamorphic and igneous geology (Lloyd et al. 2013; Woolley 2011). Specific habitat descriptions include:

  • On the Pellew Islands; sloping sandstone hills with boulders, pavement, outcrops and rocky surface, with open woodland of Darwin Stringybark (Eucalyptus tetrodonta), E. aspera, E. kombolgiensis, Acacia latifolia, A. multisiliqua, Bossiaea bossiaeoides, Calytrix spp. and a dense understorey and ground cover of Plectrachne pungens (Curtis et al. 2012; Johnson & Langford 1995; Maxwell et al. 1996).
  • Near Mt Isa; woodland of Migum (Eucalyptus leucophloia), Western Bloodwood (Corymbia terminalis), Normanton Box (Eucalyptus normantonensis), Whitewood (Atalaya hemiglauca) and Acacia spp. with Trioda spp. ground cover (Griffiths 1998 cited in Curtis et al. 2012).
  • South-east of Mt Isa; on a rocky ridge and hill-slope of igneous rock, adjoining existing powerline. Tree layer dominated by Migum, E. leucophylla and Terminalia aridicola. Sparse shrub layer dominated by Acacia spp. Grass layer dominated by Triodia spp., with Enneapogon oblongus and very limited invasion by the environmental weed Buffel Grass (Pennisetum ciliare) (Regional Ecosystem (RE) 1.12.1/1.12.1x1) (BAAM 2011; Lloyd et al. 2013).
  • East of Mt Isa; on a midslope of rocky hillside with abundant boulder piles of igneous or metamorphic rock. Very sparse tree layer dominated by Migum and E. leucophylla. Shrub layer dominated by Terminalia aridicola and Acacia spp. Grass layer dominated by Triodia spp. (RE 1.11.2a/1.11.2x4/1.12.1) (BAAM 2011; Lloyd et al. 2013).
  • East of Mt Isa; on a rocky ridge and hill-slope of metamorphic or igneous rock, adjoining existing powerline. Tree layer dominated by Migum and Atalaya hemiglauca. Mid-dense shrub layer. Grass layer dominated by Triodia spp., with Enneapogon oblongus and patchy invasion by the environmental weed Buffel Grass (RE 1.11.2a/1.11.2x1/1.12.1x1) (BAAM 2011; Lloyd et al. 2013).
  • On Selwyn Range; on a cliff base and slope of deeply weathered granite mesa with numerous boulders. Sparse tree layer dominated by Migum, E. leucophylla and Lancewood. Shrub layer dominated by Chisholm's Wattle (Acacia chisholmii). Diverse native grass layer dominated by Triodia spp., with Aristida spp., Enneapogon spp. and Themeda triandra (RE 1.7.1/1.12.1) (Lloyd et al. 2013).

Details of the microhabitat and breeding requirements of the Carpentarian Antechinus are unknown. The species occurs in rocky areas such as ridgelines, rock outcrops, jump-ups and boulder piles (BAAM 2010) and is thought to hide in rock crevices during the day (Johnson et al. 2008).

The breeding season is thought to be short occurring some time between August and October (Curts et al. 2012). Similar species have a litter size of 4–6 and it is likely that some males and females survive to breed in a second year (Curtis et al. 2012). Of seven females caught during July and August 1988, none had pouch young (Johnson & Langford 1995).

There are no data available on the diet of Carpentarian Antechinus in the wild, but captives consume invertebrates and possibly small vertebrates (Johnson et al. 2008; Johnson & Langford 1995).

The Carpentarian Antechinus is closely related to a set of Dasyurids, typically occupying rocky areas in northern and central Australia; including the Sandstone Antechinus (Pseudantechinus bilarni), Ningbing Antechinus (P. ningbing), Fat-tailed Antechinus (P. macdonellensis) and Woolley’s Antechinus (P. woolleyae). All have a somewhat flattened head, pointed muzzle and large ears, with a brown upper body and pale under body. However, the Carpentarian Antechinus is slightly smaller than the above mentioned species (Woinarski 2004).

The threats affecting the Carpentarian Antechinus are unknown. The Feral Cat (Felis catus) probably predates the species, but its rocky habitat probably provides some protection (Curtis et al. 2012). Fire regimes in northern Australia have shifted to hot, extensive late dry season fires, and, although it is unlikely that these cause direct mortality to the Carpentarian Antechinus, they may impact on the abundance and availability of their prey (Curtis et al. 2012).

Buffel grass invasion could significantly change the ecology of the central Queensland ridges where the species occurs (Lloyd et al. 2013).

The National Recovery Plan for the Carpentarian Antechinus, Butler's Dunnart (Sminthopsis butleri) and Northern Hopping-mouse (Notomys aquilo) (Woinarski 2004) outlines recovery actions for the Carpentarian Antechinus with the aim of better communicating information about the species to stakeholders. A review of the plan in 2010 indicated that a number of activities, within the range of the species, have been initiated to abate threats associated with fire, the Feral Cat and information deficiencies (DSEWPaC 2011ae).

The Mabunji Aboriginal Resource Association received $25 000 of funding, through the Threatened Species Network Community Grants in 2004–05 for the establishment of a monitoring program for this species on the Sir Edward Pellew Islands.

The following table lists known and perceived threats to this species. Threats are based on the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN) threat classification version 1.1.

Threat Class Threatening Species References
Agriculture and Aquaculture:Livestock Farming and Grazing:Grazing natural vegetation and associated habitat changes National Multi-species Recovery Plan for the Carpentarian Antechinus Pseudantechinus mimulus, Butler's Dunnart Sminthopsis butleri and Northern Hopping-mouse Notomys aquilo, 2004 - 2009 (Woinarski, J.C.Z., 2004) [Recovery Plan].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive Non-Native/Alien Species:Competition and/or predation Felis catus (Cat, House Cat, Domestic Cat) National Multi-species Recovery Plan for the Carpentarian Antechinus Pseudantechinus mimulus, Butler's Dunnart Sminthopsis butleri and Northern Hopping-mouse Notomys aquilo, 2004 - 2009 (Woinarski, J.C.Z., 2004) [Recovery Plan].
Natural System Modifications:Fire and Fire Suppression:Inappropriate and/or changed fire regimes (frequency, timing, intensity) Pseudantechinus mimulus in Species Profile and Threats (SPRAT) database (Department of the Environment and Heritage (DEH), 2006sr) [Internet].

Biodiversity and Assessment Management (BAAM) (2010). Terrestrial Ecology and Impact Assessment Report - CopperString Project EIS. Brisbane, Queensland: BAAM.

Biodiversity Assessment and Management Pty Ltd (BAAM) (2011). CopperString Project SEIS - Terrestrial Ecology Assessment Report. Report prepared for CopperString Pty Ltd.

Curtis, L.K., A.J. Dennis, K.R. McDonald, P.M. Kyne & S.J.S. Debus (2012). Queensland's Threatened Animals. CSIRO Publishing.

Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities (DSEWPaC) (2011ae). Review of the 2004 Recovery Plan for the Carpentarian Antechinus (Pseudantechinus mimulus), Butler's Dunnart (Sminthopsis butleri) and Northern Hopping-mouse (Notomys aquilo). Unpublished report.

Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities (DSEWPaC) (2011j). Survey guidelines for Australia's threatened mammals. EPBC Act survey guidelines 6.5. [Online]. EPBC Act policy statement: Canberra, ACT: DSEWPAC. Available from: http://www.environment.gov.au/epbc/publications/threatened-mammals.html.

Johnson, K.A. & D.G. Langford (1995). Carpentarian pseudantechinus. In: Strahan, R, ed. The Mammals of Australia. Page(s) 77-78. Reed Books: Sydney.

Johnson, K.J., J.C.Z. Woinarski & D.J. Langford (2008). Pseudantechinus mimulus. Van Dyck, S. & R. Strahan, eds. The Mammals of Australia. Page(s) 71-72. New Holland Publishers.

Kitchener, D.J. (1991). Pseudantechinus mimulus (Thomas, 1906) (Marsupialia, Dasyuridae): rediscovery and redescription. Records of the Western Australian Museum. 15:191-202.

Lloyd P., M. Sanders, T. Reis & A. Abbott (2013). Targeted trapping surveys shed new light on the distribution and habitat characteristics of the Carpentarian pseudantechinus (Pseudantechinus mimulus), a threatened dasyurid marsupial. Australian Mammalogy. 35:220-223. http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/AM12027.

Maxwell, S., A.A. Burbidge & K. Morris (1996). The 1996 Action Plan for Australian Marsupials and Monotremes. [Online]. Wildlife Australia, Environment Australia. Available from: http://www.environment.gov.au/resource/action-plan-australian-marsupials-and-monotremes.

Northern Territory Government (NT Government) (2011). Review of Threatened Species status in the NT 2011 - Mammals - Proposed changes involving Threatened Categories.

Strahan, R. ed (1998). The Mammals of Australia, Second Edition, rev. Sydney, NSW: Australian Museum and Reed New Holland.

Woinarski, J. & S. Ward (2006s). Threatened Species of the Northern Territory-Carpentarian Antechinus Pseudantechinus mimulus. [Online]. Northern Territory Natural Resources, Environment, The Arts and Sport. Available from: http://lrm.nt.gov.au/plants-and-animals/threatened-species/specieslist.

Woinarski, J.C.Z. (2004). National Multi-species Recovery Plan for the Carpentarian Antechinus Pseudantechinus mimulus, Butler's Dunnart Sminthopsis butleri and Northern Hopping-mouse Notomys aquilo, 2004 - 2009. [Online]. Northern Territory Department of Infrastructure Planning and Environment, Darwin. Available from: http://www.environment.gov.au/biodiversity/threatened/publications/recovery/p-mimulus-s-butleri-n-aquilo/index.html.

Woolley, P.A. (2011). Pseudantechinus mimulus: a little known dasyurid marsupial. Australian Mammalogy. 33:57-67.

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This database is designed to provide statutory, biological and ecological information on species and ecological communities, migratory species, marine species, and species and species products subject to international trade and commercial use protected under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (the EPBC Act). It has been compiled from a range of sources including listing advice, recovery plans, published literature and individual experts. While reasonable efforts have been made to ensure the accuracy of the information, no guarantee is given, nor responsibility taken, by the Commonwealth for its accuracy, currency or completeness. The Commonwealth does not accept any responsibility for any loss or damage that may be occasioned directly or indirectly through the use of, or reliance on, the information contained in this database. The information contained in this database does not necessarily represent the views of the Commonwealth. This database is not intended to be a complete source of information on the matters it deals with. Individuals and organisations should consider all the available information, including that available from other sources, in deciding whether there is a need to make a referral or apply for a permit or exemption under the EPBC Act.

Citation: Department of the Environment (2014). Pseudantechinus mimulus in Species Profile and Threats Database, Department of the Environment, Canberra. Available from: http://www.environment.gov.au/sprat. Accessed Wed, 3 Sep 2014 15:15:26 +1000.