Biodiversity

Species Profile and Threats Database


For information to assist proponents in referral, environmental assessments and compliance issues, refer to the Policy Statements and Guidelines (where available), the Conservation Advice (where available) or the Listing Advice (where available).
 
In addition, proponents and land managers should refer to the Recovery Plan (where available) or the Conservation Advice (where available) for recovery, mitigation and conservation information.

EPBC Act Listing Status Listed as Vulnerable as Coeranoscincus reticulatus
Listing and Conservation Advices Commonwealth Conservation Advice on Coeranoscincus reticulatus (Three-toed Snake-tooth Skink) (Threatened Species Scientific Committee, 2008dl) [Conservation Advice].
 
Commonwealth Listing Advice on Coeranoscincus reticulatus (Three-toed Snake-tooth Skink) (Threatened Species Scientific Committee (TSSC), 2012bf) [Listing Advice].
 
Recovery Plan Decision Recovery Plan not required, included on the Not Commenced List (1/11/2009).
 
Adopted/Made Recovery Plans
Policy Statements and Guidelines Survey guidelines for Australia's threatened reptiles. EPBC Act survey guidelines 6.6 (Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities (DSEWPaC), 2011m) [Admin Guideline].
 
Federal Register of
    Legislative Instruments
Declaration under s178, s181, and s183 of the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 - List of threatened species, List of threatened ecological communities and List of threatening processes (Commonwealth of Australia, 2000) [Legislative Instrument] as Coeranoscincus reticulatus.
 
State Government
    Documents and Websites
NSW:Three-toed Snake-tooth Skink - profile (NSW Office of Environment and Heritage (NSW OEH), 2013c) [Internet].
Non-government
    Documents and Websites
Biodiversity Recovery Plan for Gatton and Laidley Shires, South-East Queensland 2003-2008 (Boyes, B., 2004).
State Listing Status
NSW: Listed as Vulnerable (Threatened Species Conservation Act 1995 (New South Wales): August 2014 list) as Coeranoscincus reticulatus
QLD: Listed as Rare (Nature Conservation Act 1992 (Queensland): Near Threatened species: May 2014 list ) as Coeranoscincus reticulatus
Non-statutory Listing Status
IUCN: Listed as Lower Risk (near threatened) (Global Status: IUCN Red List of Threatened Species: 2013.1 list)
Scientific name Coeranoscincus reticulatus [59628]
Family Scincidae:Squamata:Reptilia:Chordata:Animalia
Species author (Gunther,1873)
Infraspecies author  
Reference  
Other names Anomalopus reticulatus [1555]
Distribution map Species Distribution Map

This is an indicative distribution map of the present distribution of the species based on best available knowledge. See map caveat for more information.

Illustrations Google Images

Scientific name: Coeranoscincus reticulatus

Common name: Three-toed Snake-tooth Skink

This genus was split from Anomalopus by Wells and Wellington (1984) and first recognised by Greer and Cogger (1985).

The Three-toed Snake-tooth Skink has reduced limbs, each with three digits (Cogger 2000). Snout-vent length (SVL) is reported as 180 mm (Cogger 2000), 195 mm (Wilson 2005; Wilson & Swan 2000) and 231 mm (McDonald 1977). Two hatchlings had a SVL of 60 mm and 58 mm and a total length of 113 mm and 112 mm (Couper et al. 1992). Measurements of nine intact specimens had tails that were 9–45% longer than their SVL (McDonald 1977), which suggests a total length of 483–565 mm.

Adults usually have a dark eye-patch, dark ear markings and a distinct wedge-shaped, pointed pale snout (Cogger 2000; Wilson & Swan 2003). Dorsal colour in adults is generally brown to yellowish brown or grey, sometimes with a vague indication of the dark juvenile bands (Wilson & Swan 2003), and side and belly scales paler brown (Cogger 2000). Individual flecked scales are streaked with dark brown, a black collar and often small, scattered dark brown spots on the back, with dark brown streaks on the throat (Cogger 2000). Adults from Cooloola and Fraser Island have been described as 'immaculate bluish grey' (Wilson & Knowles 1988). Ventral scales are normally greyish and dark-edged to form a fine reticulum-like pattern (Wilson & Knowles 1988). McDonald (1977) describes an adult bluish-grey colour form from Cooloola as having white dark-edged ventral scales. Juveniles are cream to brown dorsally with prominent, irregular transverse dark bands that are more conspicuous anteriorly, often absent posteriorly (Wilson & Swan 2003). Juveniles have dark patches centered on the eye and ear depression, the snout is cream, and the scales on the sides of the body are dark-edged, forming irregular longitudinal streaks (Wilson & Swan 2003).

The Three-toed Snake-tooth Skink occurs from Crescent Head in north-east NSW to Fraser Island in south-east Queensland (ALA 2013; DERM 2009a cited in Borsboom 2009; NSW OEH 2013b). Most records are from the Border Ranges in the vicinity of the NSW/Queensland border (Borsboom 2009). Records in fragmented habitat (Duncan 2009) and restored riparian vegetation (Barung Landcare 2008) indicates that the skink has some adaptability to modified environments as a result of clearing.

In NSW, the Three-toed Snake-tooth Skink is known as far south as the Macleay Vally and Crescent Head, although it is considered very rare south of Grafton (NSW OEH 2013c). Collections have been made from the Clarence River valley, Tweed River valley, Richmond Range, Beaury State Forest (SF), Koreelah SF, Whian Whian SF, Grafton, Grady's Creek Flora Reserve, Wiangaree SF, Yabbra SF and Mt Lion Road near the Queensland border (Cogger et al. 1993; Greer & Cogger 1985).

In Queensland, the Three-toed Snake-tooth Skink has a disjunct north-south distribution, with the species absent from apparently suitable habitat in the D'Aguilar Ranges (Wilson 2005). There is also a possible disjuncture in the northern part of its range between the lowland areas of Fraser Island and Cooloola and upland records from Blackall Range and Corondale Range (Borsboom 2009), although a record from the Maroochydore and Noosa areas (DERM 2009a cited in Borsboom 2009) indicates that the disjuncture is less severe than previously thought (Borsboom 2009). Other collections in Queensland have been made from Binnaburra, Emuvale, Tambourine Mountain, Beechmont, Lamington NP, Binna Burra, south-east of Maleny, Cooloola SF and Cunningham's Gap NP (Cogger et al. 1993; Greer & Cogger 1985).

The species extent of occurrence has been estimated at 20 000 km² (7000 km² in NSW and 13 000 km² in Queensland) (Borsboom 2009), although this estimate excluded outlying records and areas of disjuncture. The area of occupancy for the species in Queensland has been calculated at 1300 km² based on the extent of rainforest and wet schlerophyll forest habitat (Borsboom 2009).

There are no known targeted surveys for the Three-toed Snake-tooth Skink, although, during the 1990s, thorough reptile surveys occurred in north-east NSW and south-east Queensland during the Comprehensive Regional Assessment for the Regional Forest Agreement negotiations (DAFF 2012; NSW DECCW 2009b cited in Borsboom 2009; Queensland CRA/RFA Steering Committee 1998).

Given its cryptic habit, there are no population estimates for the Three-toed Snake-tooth Skink (Borsboom 2009).

The Three-toed Snake-tooth Skink has been recorded in Queensland from, but not limited to, Conondale NP, Great Sandy NP, Kondalilla NP, Lamington NP, Main Range NP, Mt Barney NP, Springbrook NP and Tamborine NP (Australian Museum 2009 cited in Borsboom 2009; DERM 2009a cited in Borsboom 2009). In NSW, records have been made in, but not limited to, Border Ranges NP, Koreelah NP, Nightcap NP, Richmond Range NP, Tooloom NP, Whian Whian State Conseravation Area, Yabbra NP, Meebin NP, Beaury SF, Ewingar SF, Girard SF, Yabbra SF, Richmond Range SF and Koreelah SF (Australian Museum 2009 cited in Borsboom 2009; NSW DECCW 2009b cited in Borsboom 2009)

The Three-toed Snake-tooth Skink has been found in loose, well mulched friable soil, in and under rotting logs, in forest litter, under fallen hoop pine bark and under decomposing cane mulch (DERM 2009a cited in Borsboom 2009; Duncan 209; Ehmann 1987; McDonald 1977; Queensland Museum 2009 cited in Borsboom 2009). Projected foliage cover was estimated at 70–80% at two sites (Ehmann 1987). In the Cooloola and Fraser Island area, the species is found in forest that grows on silica sand (McDonald 1977); in upland areas, the species is found in forests occuring on basalt derived soils (Couper et al. 1992).

In Queensland, the Three-toed Snake-tooth Skink has been recorded in rainforest, closed forest, wet sclerophyll forest, tall open Blackbutt (Eucalyptus pilularis) forest, tall layered open eucalypt forest and closed Brush Box (Lophostemon confertus) forest (Couper et al. 1992; DERM 2009a cited in Borsboom 2009; Ehmann 1987; Greer & Cogger 1985; McDonald 1977; Queensland Museum 2009 cited in Borsboom 2009). It has also been recorded from extensive regrowth in heavily logged areas (Czechura 1974).

In NSW, the Three-toed Snake-tooth Skink has been recorded in dry rainforest, northern warm temperate rainforest, subtropical rainforest, grassy wet sclerophyll forest and shrubby sclerophyll forest (NSW DECCW 2009b cited in Borsboom 2009; NSW OEH 2013c). Records have been made in logged and unlogged forest (NSW DECCW 2009b cited in Borsboom 2009).

The Three-toed Snake-tooth Skink is an egg-layer with 2–6 oviducal eggs recorded in females from Queensland with a SVL of 100–192 mm (Greer & Cogger 1985; McDonald 1977). One of the gravid females was collected south of Lamington and four on the Lamington Plateau. Three of these four gravid females were collected between October and December (Greer & Cogger 1985; McDonald 1977). A clutch of eight eggs has been found in March in moist soil beneath a rotting rainforest log in the Mistake Mountains, Queensland (Couper et al. 1992). It is unknown whether it was a single clutch or a site shared by more than one female (Couper et al. 1992). The eggs, at 23.7–28.9 mm in length, were considered large for a skink this size (Couper et al. 1992). Two of the eight eggs were successfully incubated and hatched early April (Couper et al. 1992). The hatchlings had a SVL of 60 mm and 58 mm and a total length of 113 mm and 112 mm (Couper et al. 1992). A male with a remnant yolk sac attached was captured mid-March on the Lamington Plateau, and had a SVL of 70 mm and a total length of 138 mm (McDonald 1977).

Examination of the Three-toed Snake-tooth Skink's stomach contents has found earthworms, a beetle larva, insect remains and mud (McDonald 1977). It is believed the Three-toed Snake-tooth Skink would encounter earthworms on the forest floor at night and in the loose soil that the skink burrows (McDonald 1977). In captivity the skink feeds on worms while beneath the soil surface (Ehmann 1987). It has been suggested the pointed and recurved teeth of the skink are an adaptation for preying on worms (Greer & Cogger 1985).

The Three-toed Snake-tooth Skink has been observed diurnally late in the day in January crossing a national park rainforest walking track (Macdonald 2009 cited in Borsboom 2009), and it has been observed active diurnally near the surface of forest litter (Ehmann 1987).

The Survey guidelines for Australia's threatened reptiles (DEWHA 2011m) includes survey design principles when planning a reptile survey and includes recommendations for survey methods for the Three-toed Snake-tooth Skink (DEWHA 2011m). The following information is additional to the guidelines.

The Three-toed Snake-tooth Skink can be easily distinguished from most other skinks by its reduced limbs, three toes per limb, robust shape and, in most instances, distinctive body markings (especially in juveniles). The adult bluish-grey colour form from the north of the skink’s range (McDonald 1977) could be confused superficially with Anomalopus verreauxi, but there are differences in colour pattern and the latter also has hindlimbs reduced to stumps (Cogger 2000; Wilson 2005; Wilson & Swan 2003). 

No quantitative assessment has been undertaken to assess which are the best survey methods for the Three-toed Snake-tooth Skink. One has been caught in an Elliott trap baited with oats and peanut paste (Catling et al. 1997). Surveys in NSW have caught the skink in pit-traps (Australian Museum 2009 cited in Borsboom 2009; DECCW 2009b cited in Borsboom 2009). Pit-trapping, rock lifting and log rolling in suitable habitat may enhance detectability. Tissue samples should be taken when the species is recorded outside of the species’ core distribution around the Border Ranges and Brisbane Ranges (DEWHA 2011m).

The Three-toed Snake-tooth Skink is currently threatened by (NSW OEH 2013c):

  • Clearing of habitat.
  • Removal of fallen logs and leaf litter through frequent fire.
  • Loss of leaf litter and compaction of soil through grazing by stock.
  • Habitat degradation and loss of shelter and forage habitat through habitat degradation caused by the Pig (Sus scrofa).
  • Fire causing loss of habitat at the edge of and within rainforest.

Much of the lowland closed forest within the species' range has been cleared for agriculture and grazing, pasture improvement, crop production, tropical fruit production and native forest logging. Suitable habitat has generally been reduced to patches, especially in lowland areas (Cogger et al. 1993). Broad scale clearing of remnant vegetation on Queensland freehold and leasehold land ceased in December 2006, as part of a phase out of such clearing through legislation enacted in 2004 (Qld DERM 2009d). Some clearing is exempt (fencing, roads, firebreaks, infrastructure construction) (Qld DERM 2009d) and the impact of such activity is likely to be greater in fragmented habitat.

The Cat (Felis catus) and the Fox (Vulpes vulpes) are known to prey on skinks and are mapped as widespread at varying densities across the Three-toed Snake-tooth Skink's range (Borsboom 2009). The Pig (Sus scrofa) is likely to pose a more significant threat given the degradation that it can cause to ground and litter layers (Laurance & Harrington 1997; Mitchell & Mayer 1997; Mitchell et al. 2007), although the species is absent across some of the skink's range (Borsboom 2009). 

Rotation logging is predicted to reduce the long-term number of large fallen logs (Parsonson 1994), which is preferred refuge for the Three-toed Snake-tooth Skink. Rotation logging will leave smaller logs and other logging debris, provided that that they are not burnt in post-logging regeneration burns (Parsonson 1994).

Activities that would benefit the Three-toed Snake-tooth Skink include (NSW OEH 2013c):

  • Control fire in areas of habitat to protect leaf litter and fallen logs.
  • Manage cattle grazing in areas of habitat to protect leaf litter and topsoil.
  • Retain and protect areas of rainforest and moist eucalypt forest.
  • Control the Pig when they occur within potential habitat for this species

Future surveys for the Three-toed Snake-tooth Skink should target the Big Scrub remnants of north-east NSW (NSW OEH 2013c), rainforest remnants of the Blackall Range, the Maroochydore area and south of Grafton (Borsboom 2009). The genetic relationship of skinks in the Cooloola area should be compared to other populaions given the disparate substrate utilised (silica compared to basalt) and the variation of colour patterning (Borsboom 2009). In NSW state forests, the species is considered adequately protected by general environmental guidelines for forestry operations (NSW Government 2013).

In Queensland, apart from measures developed in 1996 for the protection of the Three-toed Snake-tooth Skink from forestry activities in state forests (Fitzgerald 1996), no management guidelines have been specifically developed for the skink. Currently these Queensland state forest protective measures for the skink have little practical application, as state forests where the skink has been recorded are now either national park or protected from forestry activities on forest reserve tenure awaiting national park gazettal (Borsboom 2009).

Management documents relevant to the Three-toed Snake-tooth Skink are at the start of the profile.

The following table lists known and perceived threats to this species. Threats are based on the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN) threat classification version 1.1.

Threat Class Threatening Species References
Agriculture and Aquaculture:Agriculture and Aquaculture:Land clearing, habitat fragmentation and/or habitat degradation The Action Plan for Australian Reptiles (Cogger, H.G., E.E. Cameron, R.A. Sadlier & P. Eggler, 1993) [Cwlth Action Plan].
Agriculture and Aquaculture:Livestock Farming and Grazing:Grazing pressures and associated habitat changes Border Ranges Rainforest Biodiversity Management Plan - NSW & Queensland (NSW Department of Environment, Climate Change and Water (NSW DECCW), 2010n) [State Recovery Plan].
Northern Rivers Regional Biodiversity Management Plan (NSW Department of Environment, Climate Change and Water (NSW DECCW), 2010p) [State Recovery Plan].
Biological Resource Use:Logging and Wood Harvesting:Habitat loss, modification and degradation due to timber harvesting Coeranoscincus reticulatus in Species Profile and Threats (SPRAT) database (Department of the Environment and Heritage (DEH), 2006fa) [Internet].
Climate Change and Severe Weather:Climate Change and Severe Weather:Climate change altering atmosphere/hydrosphere temperatures, rainfall patterns and/or frequency of severe weather events Border Ranges Rainforest Biodiversity Management Plan - NSW & Queensland (NSW Department of Environment, Climate Change and Water (NSW DECCW), 2010n) [State Recovery Plan].
Climate Change and Severe Weather:Habitat Shifting and Alteration:Habitat loss, modification and/or degradation Border Ranges Rainforest Biodiversity Management Plan - NSW & Queensland (NSW Department of Environment, Climate Change and Water (NSW DECCW), 2010n) [State Recovery Plan].
Northern Rivers Regional Biodiversity Management Plan (NSW Department of Environment, Climate Change and Water (NSW DECCW), 2010p) [State Recovery Plan].
Ecosystem/Community Stresses:Indirect Ecosystem Effects:Loss and/or fragmentation of habitat and/or subpopulations Border Ranges Rainforest Biodiversity Management Plan - NSW & Queensland (NSW Department of Environment, Climate Change and Water (NSW DECCW), 2010n) [State Recovery Plan].
Northern Rivers Regional Biodiversity Management Plan (NSW Department of Environment, Climate Change and Water (NSW DECCW), 2010p) [State Recovery Plan].
Human Intrusions and Disturbance:Human Intrusions and Disturbance:Human induced disturbance due to unspecified activities Border Ranges Rainforest Biodiversity Management Plan - NSW & Queensland (NSW Department of Environment, Climate Change and Water (NSW DECCW), 2010n) [State Recovery Plan].
Northern Rivers Regional Biodiversity Management Plan (NSW Department of Environment, Climate Change and Water (NSW DECCW), 2010p) [State Recovery Plan].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive Non-Native/Alien Species:Competition and/or habitat degradation by weeds Border Ranges Rainforest Biodiversity Management Plan - NSW & Queensland (NSW Department of Environment, Climate Change and Water (NSW DECCW), 2010n) [State Recovery Plan].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Predation, competition, habitat degradation and/or spread of pathogens by introduced species Border Ranges Rainforest Biodiversity Management Plan - NSW & Queensland (NSW Department of Environment, Climate Change and Water (NSW DECCW), 2010n) [State Recovery Plan].
Northern Rivers Regional Biodiversity Management Plan (NSW Department of Environment, Climate Change and Water (NSW DECCW), 2010p) [State Recovery Plan].
Natural System Modifications:Fire and Fire Suppression:Inappropriate and/or changed fire regimes (frequency, timing, intensity) Border Ranges Rainforest Biodiversity Management Plan - NSW & Queensland (NSW Department of Environment, Climate Change and Water (NSW DECCW), 2010n) [State Recovery Plan].
Northern Rivers Regional Biodiversity Management Plan (NSW Department of Environment, Climate Change and Water (NSW DECCW), 2010p) [State Recovery Plan].
Commonwealth Conservation Advice on Coeranoscincus reticulatus (Three-toed Snake-tooth Skink) (Threatened Species Scientific Committee, 2008dl) [Conservation Advice].

Atlas of Living Australia (ALA) (2013). Atlas of Living Australia. [Online]. Available from: http://www.ala.org.au/.

Australian Museum (n.d.). Australian Museum records.

Barung Landcare (2008). Barung Landcare News.:11.

Borsboom, A. (2009). Coeranoscincus reticulatus - Species Information Sheet. Provided to the Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts. Department of Environment and Resource Management.

Catling, P.C., R.J. Burt & R. Kooyman (1997). A comparison of techniques used in a survey of the ground-dwelling and arboreal mammals in forests in north-eastern New South Wales. Wildlife Research. 24:417-432.

Cogger, H.G. (2000). Reptiles and Amphibians of Australia - 6th edition. Sydney, NSW: Reed New Holland.

Cogger, H.G., E.E. Cameron, R.A. Sadlier & P. Eggler (1993). The Action Plan for Australian Reptiles. [Online]. Canberra, ACT: Australian Nature Conservation Agency. Available from: http://www.environment.gov.au/biodiversity/threatened/action/reptiles/index.html.

Couper, P.J., J. Whittier, R.T. Mason, & G.J. Ingram (1992). A nesting record for Coeranoscincus reticulatus (Gunther). Memoirs of the Queensland Museum. 32 (1):60.

Czechura, G.V. (1974). A new south-east locality for the skink Anomalopus reticulatus. Herpetofauna. 7 (1):24.

Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry (2012). About Regional Forest Agreements. [Online]. Available from: http://www.daff.gov.au/forestry/policies/rfa/about.

Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities (DSEWPaC) (2011m). Survey guidelines for Australia's threatened reptiles. EPBC Act survey guidelines 6.6 . [Online]. Canberra, ACT: DSEWPaC. Available from: http://www.environment.gov.au/epbc/publications/threatened-reptiles.html.

Duncan, S. (2009). Three-toed snake-tooth skink. Barung Landcare News. Aug-Sep:7.

Ehmann, H. (1987). The habitat, microhabitat and feeding behaviour of the rainforest skink Coeranoscincus reticulatus. Herpetofauna. 17 (2):14-15.

Fitzgerald, M. (1996). Coeranoscincus reticulatus - Species Management Profile. Flora and Fauna Information System, Species Managmenent Manual Volume 2, Queensland Department of Natural Resources, Brisbane.

Greer, A.E. & H.G. Cogger (1985). Systematics of the reduced-limbed and limbless skinks currently assigned to the genus Anomalopus (Lacertilia: Scincidae). Records of the Australian Museum. 37 (1):11-54.

Laurance, W.F. & Harrington, G.N. (1997). Ecological associations of feeding sites of feral pigs in the Queensland wet tropics. Wildlife Research. 24:579-590.

McDonald, K.R. (1977). Observations on the skink Anomalopus reticulatus (Gunther) (Lacertilia: Scincidae). Victorian Naturalist. 94:98-103.

Mitchell, J. & R. Mayer (1997). Diggings by feral pigs within the Wet Tropics World Heritage Area of North Queensland. Wildlife Research. 24:591-601.

Mitchell, J., W. Dorney, R. Mayer & J. McIlroy (2007). Spatial and temporal patterns of feral pig diggings in rainforests of north Queensland. Wildlife Research. 34:597-602.

NSW Government (2013). Appendix B - Upper North East - Terms of Licence under the Threatened Species Conservation Act 1999. Upper North East Integrated Forestry Operations Approval Package Incorporating Amendments.

NSW Office of Environment and Heritage (NSW OEH) (2013b). NSW BioNet. [Online]. Available from: http://www.bionet.nsw.gov.au/.

NSW Office of Environment and Heritage (NSW OEH) (2013c). Three-toed Snake-tooth Skink - profile. [Online]. Available from: http://www.environment.nsw.gov.au/threatenedspecies/.

Parsonson, D.G. (1994). Environmental Impact Statement: Grafton Management Area. Report prepared on behalf of State Forests of New South Wales by Margules Groome Poyry Pty Ltd.

Queensland CRA/RFA Steering Committee (1998). Survey of Threatened Plant Species in South East Queensland Biogeographical Region. [Online]. Available from: http://www.daff.gov.au/rfa/regions/qld/environment/threatened-plant.

Wells, R.W. & C.R. Wellington (1984). A synopsis of the class Reptilia in Australia. Australian Journal of Herpetology. 1 (3-4):73-129.

Wilson, S. (2005). A field guide to reptiles of Queensland. Reed New Holland, Sydney.

Wilson, S. & G. Swan (2003). A Complete Guide to Reptiles of Australia. Page(s) 480. Sydney: Reed New Holland.

Wilson, S.K. & D.G. Knowles (1988). Australia's Reptiles: A Photographic Reference to the Terrestrial Reptiles of Australia. Australia: Collins Publishers.

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This database is designed to provide statutory, biological and ecological information on species and ecological communities, migratory species, marine species, and species and species products subject to international trade and commercial use protected under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (the EPBC Act). It has been compiled from a range of sources including listing advice, recovery plans, published literature and individual experts. While reasonable efforts have been made to ensure the accuracy of the information, no guarantee is given, nor responsibility taken, by the Commonwealth for its accuracy, currency or completeness. The Commonwealth does not accept any responsibility for any loss or damage that may be occasioned directly or indirectly through the use of, or reliance on, the information contained in this database. The information contained in this database does not necessarily represent the views of the Commonwealth. This database is not intended to be a complete source of information on the matters it deals with. Individuals and organisations should consider all the available information, including that available from other sources, in deciding whether there is a need to make a referral or apply for a permit or exemption under the EPBC Act.

Citation: Department of the Environment (2014). Coeranoscincus reticulatus in Species Profile and Threats Database, Department of the Environment, Canberra. Available from: http://www.environment.gov.au/sprat. Accessed Mon, 22 Sep 2014 23:10:35 +1000.