Biodiversity

Species Profile and Threats Database


For information to assist proponents in referral, environmental assessments and compliance issues, refer to the Policy Statements and Guidelines (where available), the Conservation Advice (where available) or the Listing Advice (where available).
 
In addition, proponents and land managers should refer to the Recovery Plan (where available) or the Conservation Advice (where available) for recovery, mitigation and conservation information.

EPBC Act Listing Status Listed as Endangered
Recovery Plan Decision Recovery Plan required, this species had a recovery plan in force at the time the legislation provided for the Minister to decide whether or not to have a recovery plan (19/2/2007).
 
Adopted/Made Recovery Plans National Recovery Plan for the Eastern Barred Bandicoot (mainland) Perameles gunnii unnamed subspecies (Hill, R., A. Winnard & M. Watson, 2010) [Recovery Plan].
 
Other EPBC Act Plans Threat Abatement Plan for Predation by the European Red Fox (Environment Australia (EA), 1999a) [Threat Abatement Plan].
 
Threat Abatement Plan for Predation by Feral Cats (Environment Australia (EA), 1999b) [Threat Abatement Plan].
 
Policy Statements and Guidelines Survey guidelines for Australia's threatened mammals. EPBC Act survey guidelines 6.5 (Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities (DSEWPaC), 2011j) [Admin Guideline].
 
Federal Register of
    Legislative Instruments
Declaration under s178, s181, and s183 of the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 - List of threatened species, List of threatened ecological communities and List of threatening processes (Commonwealth of Australia, 2000) [Legislative Instrument].
 
State Government
    Documents and Websites
VIC:Action Statement no. 4 - Eastern Barred Bandicoot Perameles gunnii (Department of Sustainability and Environment (DSE), 2009a) [State Action Plan].
Non-statutory Listing Status
VIC: Listed as Extinct in the wild (Advisory List of Threatened Vertebrate Fauna in Victoria: 2013)
Scientific name Perameles gunnii unnamed subsp. [66641]
Family Peramelidae:Polyprotodonta:Mammalia:Chordata:Animalia
Species author  
Infraspecies author  
Reference  
Distribution map Species Distribution Map

This is an indicative distribution map of the present distribution of the species based on best available knowledge. See map caveat for more information.

Illustrations Google Images

Scientific name: Perameles gunnii unnamed subsp.

Common name: Eastern Barred Bandicoot (Mainland)

The genetic diversity, as measured by the variable number of tandem repeat markers (Robinson et al. 1993) and mitochondrial DNA restriction fragment length polymorphisms (Robinson 1995), among specimens from Hamilton, Victoria was greater than that found in widespread populations of the Tasmanian subspecies (Perameles gunnii gunnii). An earlier study had found no genetic variation in either subspecies using protein gel electrophoresis (Sherwin et al. 1991). The justification for considering the mainland form to be possibly subspecifically distinct (Seebeck 2001) is based in part on morphological comparisons of island and mainland forms (George et al. 1990) and on a comment in Robinson and colleagues (1993) that MtDNA data (as then unpublished) indicated separation of 270 000—620 000 years ago. These assertions do not appear in the published analysis of that work (Robinson 1995) and such a separation time is far older than the separation of Tasmania from the mainland; usually considered to be late Pleistocene, approximately 8000 years ago (George et al. 1990).

The Eastern Barred Bandicoot (Mainland) is a yellowish-brown marsupial with 3-4 pale bars on its hindquarters (not always discernable). It has large pointed ears and a tail which grows to 11 cm long. It grows up to 35 cm long and can weigh between 500—1100 g, with an average weight of approximately 660 g (Backhouse & Crosthwaite 1996; Cronin 1991; Strahan 1998).

The Eastern Barred Bandicoot (Mainland) currently exists at seven isolated sites at Hamilton, Victoria. It was once widespread over the volcanic plains of south-west Victoria but by the 1960s was already restricted to the western extremity of this range and by the 1970s was limited to the vicinity of Hamilton, Victoria (Seebeck 1979).

The population at Hamilton, Victoria was estimated to be less than or equal to 633 with an effective population size of less than 67 in 1983—85 (Sherwin & Brown 1990) and 246 in 1988 (Dufty 1991). Furthermore, about 49 animals were captured in 1989 and fewer than five in 1991 and 1992. This is thought to be mainly due to drought conditions and predation by feral predators (Winnard & Coulson 2008), however, removal of animals for captive breeding was considered to have exacerbated their decline (Clark et al. 1995b).

An initial satellite population was established in a captive colony at Gellibrand Hill (now Woodlands Historic Park, Melbourne) using animals captured at Hamilton between 1988 and 1991 (Dufty et al. 1995; Menkhorst & Seebeck 1990). Since 1990, other captive colonies have been established at Hamilton and Mooramong (Backhouse et al. 1995) and at Floating Island Nature Reserve near Colac, Lake Goldsmith Wildlife Reserve near Beaufort, and at a private property near Hamilton (Humphries & Seebeck 1995; Seebeck 1996, 2001). The initial satellite colony at Woodlands Historic Park is the largest, with a population numbering over 500 in 1994 (Dufty et al. 1995) and over 600 in 1996 (Seebeck 1996).

Although an accurate estimate of the wild population of the subspecies is not available, numbers are likely to be 100 individuals or less (Winnard & Coulson 2008). At such a level, the population could be considered to be functionally extinct (Todd et al. 2002). Ongoing conservation of the sub-species is therefore still reliant on the success of captive breeding and reintroduction programs.

There are Pleistocene records from South Australia and New South Wales and subfossil Holocene records from throughout west Victoria (Seebeck 2001) that indicate the species' range was once much larger.

The habitat of the Eastern Barred Bandicoot (mainland) is perennial tussock grassland and eucalypt woodland with a grassy ground layer (Dufty 1994b; Seebeck 1995a, 2001). Drainage lines and areas of high vegetative cover have been identified as prime habitat (Winnard & Coulson 2008).

The key determining factor for persistence of this species appears to be high structural complexity and heterogeneity within the environment, reflected in its absence from agricultural areas but persistence in rubbish dumps and other variable habitats (Dufty 1994b). It should be noted that the species is adaptable to highly modified environments (Backhouse & Crosthwaite 1996).

The Eastern Barred Badicoot (Mainland) has a life span of up to 6 years, but generally survives between 1 to 3 years in the wild (Todd et al. 2002). The sub-species is generally solitary, polygamous and nocturnal.
The Eastern Barred Bandicoot (Mainland) uses a nest for daytime refuge as well as breeding. Nests are constructed at or just below ground level, often under a covering object. At Hamilton, nests are frequently located under rubbish or beneath houses (Seebeck 2001).

The Eastern Barred Bandicoot (Mainland) can breed all year, but there is usually a reduction or cessation of breeding during hot dry summers (Dufty 1994a; Seebeck 1995a). Females are polyoestrous, can breed at four months of age and may produce up to five litters per year (Winnard & Coulson, 2008). Mean lifetime production is 2.6 offspring per female (sd = 5.37, n = 18), with one female producing a total of 18 offspring over the study period (Sherwin & Brown 1990). In other studies, mean litter size was estimated at 2.11 (sd = 0.1, range = 1-4, n = 38) (Dufty 1991) and 2.2 (sd = 0.1, n = 66) (Dufty 1994a).

Young begin to emerge from the pouch at 46 days and are weaned between 57 and 86 days (Dufty 1995). Juvenile mortality is high (Dufty 1991).

Stomach and faecal analysis of the Eastern Barred Bandicoot (Mainland) has shown its diet is primarily earthworms, with beetles and grasshoppers as secondary items. Plant material is also a significant constituent of stomach contents (Dufty 1994b). In an earlier study kitchen scraps and orchard fruits were also reported (Dufty 1991).

Limited data on dispersal of the Eastern Barred Bandicoot (Mainland) indicates that post-weaning dispersal is greater in males than females (Dufty 1994a), as is typical in solitary mammals. Home ranges are slightly larger for males than for females (male mean = 4.0 ha, female mean = 1.6) and ranges of both males and females show considerable overlap (Dufty 1994b).

On the basis of previous survey data, the following techniques are suitable for the detection of the presence of the Eastern Barred Bandicoot (Mainland) in areas up to 5 ha in size (DSEWPaC 2011j):

  • daytime searches for potential habitat resources, such as areas with open grassland in proximity to refuge and shelter sites
  • daytime searches for signs, such as scats, tracks, nests and conical foraging holes
  • collection and analysis of predator scats
  • soil plot surveys
  • hair tube surveys
  • cage trapping
  • baited camera traps.

It must be noted that as the Eastern Barred Bandicoot (Mainland) has a range overlap with the Southern Brown Bandicoot (Isoodon obesulus obesulus), direct detection techniques should be targeted at sites with signs of nesting or foraging in order distinguish between the species (DSEWPaC 2011j).

Some researchers have reported that cage trapping and hair sampling appear to be relatively unsuccessful at detecting medium-sized mammals, especially when compared to the time and effort they require. Therefore, it is recommended that initial detection effort be focussed on searches for signs and soil plot surveys. Baited camera traps may be the most effective method for identifying to the species level (DSEWPaC 2011j).

It is also recommended that advice should be sought from relevant local community groups and government organisations prior to the commencement of field investigations. As the species is cryptic and patchy in its distribution, local knowledge and traditional ecological knowledge of the species would be highly valuable (DSEWPaC 2011j).

The Fox (Vulpes vulpes), the Cat (Felis catus) and the Dog (Canis lupus familiaris) are considered to be major threats to the Eastern Barred Bandicoot (Mainland) (Seebeck et al. 1990). Of 160 recorded adult and subadult deaths, 24 have been attributed to the Cat and three to the Dog, while 85 have been attributed to road-kills (Dufty 1994a). The Rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) is considered to compete directly for shelter and indirectly by reducing habitat (Seebeck 2001).

Habitat destruction due to clearing and the actions of domestic stock is considered to have contributed to the decline of the subspecies (Seebeck et al. 1990).

The Cat is also the primary host of Toxoplasma gondii, a highly contagious parasite. Toxoplasmosis has been observed to be a cause of morbidity and death in the Tasmanian Eastern Barred Bandicoot subsp. and could also be a threat to the mainland population (Obendorf & Munday 1990; Obendorf et al. 1996).

Hamilton Field Naturalists Club (Vic) received $6900 of funding through the Threatened Species Network Community Grants in 2004-05 for raising community awareness about responsible pet ownership and working with local governments to implement a feral Cat trapping program.

Management documents for the Eastern Barred Bandicoot (Mainland) are at the start of the profile. Other relevant documents include the:

  • Hamilton Community Parklands Bandicoot Enclosure Management Plan (Burnard 2002).

The following table lists known and perceived threats to this species. Threats are based on the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN) threat classification version 1.1.

Threat Class Threatening Species References
Agriculture and Aquaculture:Agriculture and Aquaculture:Land clearing, habitat fragmentation and/or habitat degradation Perameles gunnii unnamed subsp.in Species Profile and Threats (SPRAT) database (Department of the Environment and Heritage, 2006so) [Internet].
Recovery Plan for the Eastern Barred Bandicoot Perameles gunnii (mainland subspecies) - 1989-1999 (Watson, M., Halley, M., 1996) [State Recovery Plan].
Agriculture and Aquaculture:Livestock Farming and Grazing:Grazing pressures and associated habitat changes Recovery Plan for the Eastern Barred Bandicoot Perameles gunnii (mainland subspecies) - 1989-1999 (Watson, M., Halley, M., 1996) [State Recovery Plan].
Agriculture and Aquaculture:Livestock Farming and Grazing:Habitat alteration (vegetation, soil, hydrology) due to trampling and grazing by livestock Perameles gunnii unnamed subsp.in Species Profile and Threats (SPRAT) database (Department of the Environment and Heritage, 2006so) [Internet].
Climate Change and Severe Weather:Climate Change and Severe Weather:Reduced rainfall caused by climate change National Recovery Plan for the Eastern Barred Bandicoot (mainland) Perameles gunnii unnamed subspecies (Hill, R., A. Winnard & M. Watson, 2010) [Recovery Plan].
Recovery Plan for the Eastern Barred Bandicoot Perameles gunnii (mainland subspecies) - 1989-1999 (Watson, M., Halley, M., 1996) [State Recovery Plan].
Climate Change and Severe Weather:Droughts:Drought National Recovery Plan for the Eastern Barred Bandicoot (mainland) Perameles gunnii unnamed subspecies (Hill, R., A. Winnard & M. Watson, 2010) [Recovery Plan].
Climate Change and Severe Weather:Habitat Shifting and Alteration:Habitat loss, modification and/or degradation National Recovery Plan for the Eastern Barred Bandicoot (mainland) Perameles gunnii unnamed subspecies (Hill, R., A. Winnard & M. Watson, 2010) [Recovery Plan].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive Non-Native/Alien Species:Competition and/or habitat degradation Oryctolagus cuniculus (Rabbit, European Rabbit) Perameles gunnii unnamed subsp.in Species Profile and Threats (SPRAT) database (Department of the Environment and Heritage, 2006so) [Internet].
Mammalian Species No. 654: Perameles gunnii. American Society of Mammologists. 64(5):1-8. (Seebeck, J.H., 2001) [Journal].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive Non-Native/Alien Species:Competition and/or habitat degradation by weeds Recovery Plan for the Eastern Barred Bandicoot Perameles gunnii (mainland subspecies) - 1989-1999 (Watson, M., Halley, M., 1996) [State Recovery Plan].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive Non-Native/Alien Species:Competition and/or predation Vulpes vulpes (Red Fox, Fox) Perameles gunnii unnamed subsp.in Species Profile and Threats (SPRAT) database (Department of the Environment and Heritage, 2006so) [Internet].
National Recovery Plan for the Eastern Barred Bandicoot (mainland) Perameles gunnii unnamed subspecies (Hill, R., A. Winnard & M. Watson, 2010) [Recovery Plan].
Status, distribution and biogeography of the Eastern Barred Bandicoot, Perameles gunnii, in Victoria. In: Clark, T.W. & Seebeck, J.H., eds. Management and Conservation of Small Populations. Page(s) 21-32. (Seebeck, J.H., A.F. Bennett & A.C. Dufty, 1990) [Proceedings].
Recovery Plan for the Eastern Barred Bandicoot Perameles gunnii (mainland subspecies) - 1989-1999 (Watson, M., Halley, M., 1996) [State Recovery Plan].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive Non-Native/Alien Species:Competition and/or predation Felis catus (Cat, House Cat, Domestic Cat) Perameles gunnii unnamed subsp.in Species Profile and Threats (SPRAT) database (Department of the Environment and Heritage, 2006so) [Internet].
Status, distribution and biogeography of the Eastern Barred Bandicoot, Perameles gunnii, in Victoria. In: Clark, T.W. & Seebeck, J.H., eds. Management and Conservation of Small Populations. Page(s) 21-32. (Seebeck, J.H., A.F. Bennett & A.C. Dufty, 1990) [Proceedings].
Recovery Plan for the Eastern Barred Bandicoot Perameles gunnii (mainland subspecies) - 1989-1999 (Watson, M., Halley, M., 1996) [State Recovery Plan].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive Non-Native/Alien Species:Competition and/or predation Canis lupus familiaris (Domestic Dog) Perameles gunnii unnamed subsp.in Species Profile and Threats (SPRAT) database (Department of the Environment and Heritage, 2006so) [Internet].
Status, distribution and biogeography of the Eastern Barred Bandicoot, Perameles gunnii, in Victoria. In: Clark, T.W. & Seebeck, J.H., eds. Management and Conservation of Small Populations. Page(s) 21-32. (Seebeck, J.H., A.F. Bennett & A.C. Dufty, 1990) [Proceedings].
Recovery Plan for the Eastern Barred Bandicoot Perameles gunnii (mainland subspecies) - 1989-1999 (Watson, M., Halley, M., 1996) [State Recovery Plan].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive Non-Native/Alien Species:Infection by parasites Perameles gunnii unnamed subsp.in Species Profile and Threats (SPRAT) database (Department of the Environment and Heritage, 2006so) [Internet].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Presence of pathogens and resulting disease Recovery Plan for the Eastern Barred Bandicoot Perameles gunnii (mainland subspecies) - 1989-1999 (Watson, M., Halley, M., 1996) [State Recovery Plan].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Problematic Native Species:Competition, predation and/or habitat degradation by kangaroos and wallabies National Recovery Plan for the Eastern Barred Bandicoot (mainland) Perameles gunnii unnamed subspecies (Hill, R., A. Winnard & M. Watson, 2010) [Recovery Plan].
Natural System Modifications:Fire and Fire Suppression:Inappropriate prescribed regimes and/or vegetation management to control fire regimes Recovery Plan for the Eastern Barred Bandicoot Perameles gunnii (mainland subspecies) - 1989-1999 (Watson, M., Halley, M., 1996) [State Recovery Plan].
Residential and Commercial Development:Housing and Urban Areas:Habitat loss, modification and fragmentation due to urban development Recovery Plan for the Eastern Barred Bandicoot Perameles gunnii (mainland subspecies) - 1989-1999 (Watson, M., Halley, M., 1996) [State Recovery Plan].
Species Stresses:Indirect Species Effects:Low genetic diversity and genetic inbreeding National Recovery Plan for the Eastern Barred Bandicoot (mainland) Perameles gunnii unnamed subspecies (Hill, R., A. Winnard & M. Watson, 2010) [Recovery Plan].
Species Stresses:Indirect Species Effects:Low numbers of individuals National Recovery Plan for the Eastern Barred Bandicoot (mainland) Perameles gunnii unnamed subspecies (Hill, R., A. Winnard & M. Watson, 2010) [Recovery Plan].

Backhouse G.N., T.W. Clark & R.P. Reading (1995). Reintroductions for recovery of the eastern barred bandicoot Perameles gunnii in Victoria, Australia. In: Serena, M., ed. Reintroduction biology of Australian and New Zealand fauna. Page(s) 209-218. Surrey Beatty & Sons: Chipping Norton, NSW.

Backhouse, G. & J. Crosthwaite (1996). Action Statement no. 4- Eastern Barred Bandicoot Perameles gunnii. Victoria: Department of Natural Resources and Environment.

Burnard, T. (2002). Hamilton Community Parklands Bandicoot Enclosure Management Plan. [Online]. Prepared for the Eastern Barred Bandicoot Recovery Team and the Southern Grampians Community. Available from: http://mams.rmit.edu.au/s3zf7x8cun3kz.pdf.

Clark, T.W., J.P. Gibbs & P.W. Goldstraw (1995b). Some demographics of the extirpation from the wild of eastern barred bandicoots (Perameles gunnii) in 1988-91, near Hamilton, Victoria, Australia. Wildlife Research. 22:289-297.

Cronin, L. (1991). Key Guide to Australian Mammals. Balgowlah, NSW: Reed Books.

Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities (DSEWPaC) (2011j). Survey guidelines for Australia's threatened mammals. EPBC Act survey guidelines 6.5. [Online]. EPBC Act policy statement: Canberra, ACT: DSEWPAC. Available from: http://www.environment.gov.au/epbc/publications/threatened-mammals.html.

Dufty, A.C. (1991). Some population characteristics of Perameles gunnii in Victoria. Wildlife Research. 18: 355-366.

Dufty, A.C. (1994a). Population demography of the eastern barred bandicoot (Perameles gunnii) at Hamilton, Victoria. Wildlife Research. 21: 445-457.

Dufty, A.C. (1994b). Habitat and spatial requirements of the eastern barred bandicoot (Perameles gunnii) at Hamilton, Victoria. Wildlife Research. 21: 459-472.

Dufty, A.C. (1995). The growth and development of the eastern barred bandicoot Perameles gunnii in Victoria. Victorian Naturalist. 112: 79-85.

Dufty, A.C., J.H. Seebeck, J. McKay & A.J. Watson (1995). Reintroduction of the eastern barred bandicoot Perameles gunnii at Gellibrand Hill Park, Victoria. In: Serena, M., ed. Reintroduction biology of Australian and New Zealand fauna. Page(s) 219-225. Surrey Beatty & Sons: Chipping Norton, NSW.

George, G.G., J. Dixon, G. Challis & R.C. Lacy (1990). The taxonomy and palaeontology of the Eastern Barred Bandicoot: their bearing on management of the Victorian population. In: Clark, T.W. & J.H. Seebeck, eds. Management and Conservation of Small Populations. Page(s) 33-46. Chicago, Illinois: Zoological Society.

Hill, R., A. Winnard & M. Watson (2010). National Recovery Plan for the Eastern Barred Bandicoot (mainland) Perameles gunnii unnamed subspecies. [Online]. Melbourne, Victoria: Victorian Government Department of Sustainability and Environment (DSE). Available from: http://www.environment.gov.au/biodiversity/threatened/publications/recovery/perameles-gunnii.html.

Humphries R.K. & J.H. Seebeck (1995). Conservation of the Eastern Barred Bandicoot Perameles gunnii on private land in Victoria. In: Bennett, A., Backhouse, G. & Clark, T., eds. People and nature conservation: perspectives on private land use and endangered species recovery. Page(s) 156-162. Surrey Beatty & Sons: Chipping Norton, NSW.

Maguire, L.A., R.C. Lacy, R.J. Begg & T.W. Clark (1990). An analysis of alternative strategies for recovering the Eastern Barred Bandicoot in Victoria. In: Clark, T.W. & Seebeck, J.H., eds. Management and Conservation of Small Populations. Page(s) 147-164. Chicago Zoological Society : Illinois.

Menkhorst, P.W. & J.H.Seebeck (1990). Distribution and conservation status of bandicoots in Victoria. In: Seebeck, J.H., P.R. Brown, R.L. Wallis & C.M. Kemper, eds. Bandicoots and Bilbies. Page(s) 51-60. Chipping Norton, NSW: Surrey Beatty & Sons.

Obendorf, D.L. & B.L. Munday (1990). Toxoplasmosis in wild Eastern Barred Bandicoots, Perameles gunnii. In: Seebeck, J.H., P.R. Brown, R.L. Wallis & C.M. Kemper, eds. Bandicoots and Bilbies. Page(s) 193-197. Chipping Norton, NSW: Surrey Beatty & Sons.

Obendorf, D.L., P. Statham & M. Driessen (1996). Detection of agglutinating antibodies to Toxoplasma gondii in sera from free-ranging Eastern Barred Bandicoots (Perameles gunnii). Journal of Wildlife Diseases. 32:623-626.

Robinson, N.A. (1995). Implications from mitochondrial DNA for management to conserve the Eastern Barred Bandicoot (Perameles gunnii). Conservation Biology. 9:114-125.

Robinson, N.A., N.D. Murray & W.B. Sherwin (1993). VNTR loci reveal differentiation between and structure within populations of the Eastern Barred Bandicoot Perameles gunnii. Molecular Ecology. 2:195-207.

Seebeck, J.H. (1979). Status of the barred bandicoot, Perameles gunnii, in Victoria: with a note on husbandry of a captive colony. Australian Wildlife Research. 6: 255-264.

Seebeck, J.H. (1990). Recovery management of the Eastern Barred Bandicoot in Victoria: statewide strategy. In: Clark, T.W. & Seebeck, J.H., eds. Management and Conservation of Small Populations. Page(s) 165-177. Chicago Zoological Society : Illinois.

Seebeck, J.H. (1995a). Eastern barred bandicoot. In: Mammals of Victoria. Page(s) 75-77.

Seebeck, J.H. (1996). Eastern barred bandicoot recovery in Victoria: update 1996. In: Newsletter of the Australian Mammal Society. Nov:19. Unpublished.

Seebeck, J.H. (2001). Mammalian Species No. 654: Perameles gunnii. American Society of Mammologists. 64(5):1-8.

Seebeck, J.H., A.F. Bennett & A.C. Dufty (1990). Status, distribution and biogeography of the Eastern Barred Bandicoot, Perameles gunnii, in Victoria. In: Clark, T.W. & Seebeck, J.H., eds. Management and Conservation of Small Populations. Page(s) 21-32. Chicago Zoological Society : Illinois.

Sherwin, W.B. & P.R. Brown (1990). Problems in the estimation of the effective population size of the eastern barred bandicoot Perameles gunnii at Hamilton, Victoria. In: Seebeck, J.H., P.R. Brown, R.L. Wallis & C.M. Kemper, eds. Bandicoots and Bilbies. Page(s) 367-374. Surrey Beatty & Sons: Chipping Norton, NSW.

Sherwin, W.B., N.D. Murray, J.A. Marshall Graves & P.R. Brown (1991). Measurement of genetic variation in endangered populations: bandicoots (Marsupialia: Peramelidae) as an example. Conservation Biology. 5: 103-108.

Strahan, R. (Ed.) (1998). The Mammals of Australia, Second Edition, rev. Sydney, NSW: Australian Museum and Reed New Holland.

Todd, C.R., S. Jenkins & A.R. Bearlin (2002). Lessons about extinction and translocation: models for eastern barred bandicoots (Perameles gunnii) at Woodlands Historic Park, Victoria, Australia. Biological Conservation. 106:211-223.

Winnard, A.L. & G. Coulson (2008). Sixteen years of Eastern Barred Bandicoot Peramelys gunnii Reintroductions in Victoria: a review. Pacific Conservation Biology. 14:34-53.

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This database is designed to provide statutory, biological and ecological information on species and ecological communities, migratory species, marine species, and species and species products subject to international trade and commercial use protected under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (the EPBC Act). It has been compiled from a range of sources including listing advice, recovery plans, published literature and individual experts. While reasonable efforts have been made to ensure the accuracy of the information, no guarantee is given, nor responsibility taken, by the Commonwealth for its accuracy, currency or completeness. The Commonwealth does not accept any responsibility for any loss or damage that may be occasioned directly or indirectly through the use of, or reliance on, the information contained in this database. The information contained in this database does not necessarily represent the views of the Commonwealth. This database is not intended to be a complete source of information on the matters it deals with. Individuals and organisations should consider all the available information, including that available from other sources, in deciding whether there is a need to make a referral or apply for a permit or exemption under the EPBC Act.

Citation: Department of the Environment (2014). Perameles gunnii unnamed subsp. in Species Profile and Threats Database, Department of the Environment, Canberra. Available from: http://www.environment.gov.au/sprat. Accessed Thu, 24 Apr 2014 04:30:44 +1000.