Biodiversity

Species Profile and Threats Database


For information to assist proponents in referral, environmental assessments and compliance issues, refer to the Policy Statements and Guidelines (where available), the Conservation Advice (where available) or the Listing Advice (where available).
 
In addition, proponents and land managers should refer to the Recovery Plan (where available) or the Conservation Advice (where available) for recovery, mitigation and conservation information.

EPBC Act Listing Status Listed as Critically Endangered as Potorous gilbertii
Listing and Conservation Advices Commonwealth Listing Advice on Potorous gilbertii (Gilbert's Potoroo) (Threatened Species Scientific Committee (TSSC), 2004c) [Listing Advice].
 
Recovery Plan Decision Recovery Plan required, this species had a recovery plan in force at the time the legislation provided for the Minister to decide whether or not to have a recovery plan (19/2/2007).
 
Adopted/Made Recovery Plans Gilbert's Potoroo (Potorous gilbertii) Recovery Plan July 2003-June 2008 (Courtenay, J. & T. Friend, 2004) [Recovery Plan] as Potorous gilbertii.
 
Other EPBC Act Plans Threat Abatement Plan for predation by feral cats (Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts (DEWHA), 2008zzp) [Threat Abatement Plan].
 
Threat Abatement Plan for Predation by the European Red Fox (Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts (DEWHA), 2008zzq) [Threat Abatement Plan].
 
Policy Statements and Guidelines Survey guidelines for Australia's threatened mammals. EPBC Act survey guidelines 6.5 (Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities (DSEWPaC), 2011j) [Admin Guideline].
 
Federal Register of
    Legislative Instruments
Declaration under s178, s181, and s183 of the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 - List of threatened species, List of threatened ecological communities and List of threatening processes (Commonwealth of Australia, 2000) [Legislative Instrument] as Potorous gilbertii.
 
Inclusion of species in the list of threatened species under section 178 of the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (22/06/2004) (Gilbert's Potoroo, Western Swamp Tortoise) (Commonwealth of Australia, 2004d) [Legislative Instrument] as Potorous gilbertii.
 
State Government
    Documents and Websites
WA:Gilbert's potoroo translocated to new areas find their fungi. Information Sheet 4/2009 (Bougher, N. & T. Friend, 2009q) [Information Sheet].
WA:Gilbert's Potoroo Information Sheet (Western Australia Department of Environment and Conservation (WA DEC), 2009k) [Information Sheet].
WA:Gilbert's Potoroo (Western Australia Department of Environment and Conservation (WA DEC), 2009l) [Internet].
WA:Fauna Species Profiles - Gilbert's Potoroo Potorous gilbertii (Gould, 1841) (Western Australia Department of Environment and Conservation (WA DEC), 2010h) [Information Sheet].
Non-government
    Documents and Websites
The action plan for threatened Australian macropods 2011-2021 (World Wildlife Fund for Nature - Australia (WWF), 2011).
State Listing Status
WA: Listed as Critically Endangered (Wildlife Conservation Act 1950 (Western Australia): September 2013 list) as Potorous gilbertii
Non-statutory Listing Status
IUCN: Listed as Critically Endangered (Global Status: IUCN Red List of Threatened Species: 2013.1 list)
Scientific name Potorous gilbertii [66642]
Family Potoroidae:Diprotodonta:Mammalia:Chordata:Animalia
Species author  
Infraspecies author  
Reference  
Other names Potorous tridactylus gilbertii [26199]
Potorous tridactylus gilberti [66643]
Distribution map Species Distribution Map

This is an indicative distribution map of the present distribution of the species based on best available knowledge. See map caveat for more information.

Illustrations Google Images

Scientific name: Potorous gilbertii

Common name: Gilbert's Potoroo

Gilbert's Potoroo was originally described as a separate species but has been included in Potorous tridactylus by most recent authors. Since its rediscovery, in 1994, it has been recognised as a distinct species (Courtenay et al. 1996) which has been confirmed by genetic studies (Sinclair & Westerman 1997).

Gilbert's Potoroo is a small nocturnal marsupial which lives in small groups or colonies. It has long hind feet and long, curved claws on its front feet that it uses to dig for food (TSSC 2004c). The body is densely furred but the tail has very little fur and curls up tightly when the potoroo is inactive. (Courtenay & Friend 2004; WA DEC 2009k). The species is brown to grey above and paler below, it has a slender and slightly downwards curved snout (as in other potoroos) and dense fur on the sides of its face (Friend 2008). Gilbert's Potoroos' eyes appear to bulge and look at an angle, while its round ears are almost buried in long soft fur (WA DEC 2009k).

Males and females are similar in body type and adult females range in size from 708–1205 g (including pouch-young where present). Adult males range in size from 845–1200 g. The head and body length of females ranges between 291–343 mm and for males the range is 286–371 mm (Friend 2008; WA DEC 2009k).

Gilbert's Potoroo is endemic to south-west Western Australia and is known to occur in the wild at one very small site on the Mt Gardner headland in Two Peoples Bay Nature Reserve (TSSC 2004c). The species was thought to be extinct from the early 1900s, until it was rediscovered in 1994 on the Mt Gardner headland (Courtenay & Friend 2004; Friend 2008; Sinclair et al. 1996). It is also known from a captive population in Two Peoples Bay Nature Reserve and a translocated population on Bald Island Nature Reserve, about 50 km east of Albany (Schoch 2007).

The species was taken by three collectors between 1840 and 1879 in the vicinity of King George's Sound (Albany) but exact locations are not known. Skeletal material is common in cave deposits between Cape Leeuwin and Cape Naturaliste. Sub-fossil skeletal specimens have been located in coastal sand dunes between these localities (Maxwell et al. 1996).

Since the mid-1800s, the species has apparently decreased in distribution and abundance from around Albany, and possibly from other areas of south-west Western Australia, to the extent that it now occurs in one very small population in one location. It is also considered that a recent population bottleneck has occurred in this species. From this evidence, it may be suspected that a very severe decline in numbers has occurred since the mid-1800s (TSSC 2004c).

The extent of occurrence for Gilbert's Potoroo is estimated to be 8 km² and its area of occupancy is less than 5 km² (TSSC 2004c).

Specific surveys to detect Gilbert's Potoroo were undertaken over a period of 10 years, east and west of Two Peoples Bay, by the Western Australia Department of Conservation and Land Management (WA CALM). The searches also involved a community project initiated by the Denmark Environment Centre and funded by the WWF Threatened Species Network. The surveys involved the use of hair-arches to collect hairs for identification, and were concentrated in dense heathland which had not been burnt for a long period of time. No further populations of Gilbert's Potoroo were located (Friend 2008a).

There are an estimated 30–40 individuals in the Mount Gardner (wild) population (Friend 2008a). Eleven Gilbert's Potoroos were released onto Bald Island in two separate releases between 2005–2007 (WA DEC 2009j). There are indications that these animals are breeding and that the island can sustain a population of this species (Friend 2008a; Schoch 2007); by mid 2009 the population of Gilbert's Potoroo on Bald Island had reached an estimated 35 individuals (WA DEC 2009j).

There is a captive Gilbert's Potoroo colony at Two Peoples Bay Nature Reserve. This captive colony enables Gilbert's Potoroos to be bred for translocation, aiding the long-term survival of the species. The colony was founded using six adults (with three young in pouches) from a wild population. The colony produced eight young between 1995–2001 (Friend 2008a).

A wild population of Gilbert's Potoroo occurs in Two Peoples Bay Nature Reserve (on Mt Gardner in Two Peoples Bay), east of Albany. Captive colonies of the species have been established in the Two Peoples Bay Nature Reserve and on Bald Island Nature Reserve off the coast of Western Australia (WA DEC 2009k).

At Two Peoples Bay, the wild population of Gilbert's Potoroo inhabits dense low heath on the slopes of Mt Gardner. A network of tunnels through this heathland enables the potoroos to move around quickly under cover. This cover consists mainly of shrubs between 1.5–2 m tall, often dominated by Melaleuca striata. A dense layer of sedges, including Lepidosperma spp. and Anarthria scabra, grows beneath this canopy (WA DEC 2009k). Gilbert's Potoroo uses Gastrolobium spp. thickets and sometimes shelters under deep accumulations of "needles" in Sheoak (Allocasuarina fraseriana) clumps. It apparently avoids areas where dieback disease caused by the root pathogen Phytophthora cinnamomi has modified the structure and floristic assemblage of heathlands (Maxwell et al. 1996).

Female Gilbert's Potoroos become sexually mature by the end of their first year and males may breed before the end of their second year. Breeding occurs throughout the year (Friend 2008) and there is little evidence of seasonality in the production of young in the species (Courtney & Friend 2004).

A single young is born about six weeks after mating and is approximately 1 cm long at birth. The young remains in the pouch for up to four months, first emerging at approximately 150 g in weight, about a week before permanent pouch exit and the birth of the subsequent young (Friend 2008; WA DEC 2009k). The juvenile potoroo remains in the mother's home range well after weaning, leaving at between 7–18 months of age. The average lifespan for both sexes is 10 years (WA DEH 2009k).

For unknown reasons, between 20–40% of Gilbert's Potoroo pouch-young do not reach maturity (Friend 2008). The Western Australia Department of Environment and Conservation has been placing Gilbert's Potoroo joeys in the pouches of Long-nosed Potoroo females (cross-fostering), in order to raise the reproductive rate of Gilbert's Potoroo (Friend 2008a; McGhee 2007). Cross-fostering can result in a substantial increase in the production of an endangered species. Potoroos often have an undeveloped embryo inside them which starts to develop with the removal of a suckling joey. This results in the birth of another joey four weeks later (Friend 2008a).

Gilbert's Potoroo diet is unusual for a mammal species and consists almost entirely of fungi (Courtenay & Friend 2004). Spores of over 40 species of fungi have been found in the faecal pellets of the Gilbert's Potoroos at Two Peoples Bay Nature Reserve (Friend 2008; WA DEC 2009k). Although some epigeous (above-ground) fungi are taken, sporocarps (fruiting bodies/truffles) of underground fungi make up 90% of their diet (Friend 2008). In this symbiotic relationship, the fungi benefits from the dispersal of its spores via the species' dung, and the potoroo benefits from the nutritional value of the fungal fruit body. Gilbert's Potoroo eat fungi all year round and are one of the most fungi dependent mammals in the world. The remainder of the species' diet includes small insects and small fleshy fruits of Billardiera, Leucopogon, Astroloma and Marianthus species (WA DEC 2009k).

After several years on Bald Island, Gilbert's Potoroo were found to be consuming 27 species of fungi; 13 species of the fungi were the same as those that had been consumed by Gilbert's Potoroo within days of release onto the island. This indicates that consumption of fungi had been sustained at least one to two years after translocation and included successfully reproducing animals (Bougher & Friend 2009q).

Gilbert's Potoroo is nocturnal, emerging at dusk from their nest sites under sedges to commence an early period of activity, resting for periods during the night and ceasing activity before dawn (Friend 2008a).

Home range estimates, derived from radio-tracking over two week periods, vary from 15–25 ha for males and 3–6 ha for females, young-at-heel and sub-adult animals of both sexes (Courtenay & Friend 2004). Gilbert's Potoroo live in small groups/colonies that are isolated from each other, but dispersing sub-adult animals and some older males move between them. Amongst the resident animals there is little overlap in home range between animals of the same sex but there is extensive home range overlap between the male and female (Courtenay & Friend 2004).

The major method used to search for Gilbert's Potoroo, is the hair-arch survey which uses small arches of flexible plastic sheeting held in shape by bent wire. The arches are placed in animal runways, sometimes with bait underneath them to encourage animals through. Double-sided sticky tape inside the arches collects small samples of hair from the animals. Microscopic analysis is then used to identify the species to which the hair belongs. These surveys are labour intensive and researchers using this method require skills in construction and placement of the arches, recognition of appropriate habitat for placement, dieback hygiene, hair identification, and sample storage and curation. The advantage of hair-arch surveys is that they avoid the need to physically trap and release animals (WA DEC 2009l).

Gilbert's Potoroo and its habitat are subject to a number of ongoing threats including predation by European Red Foxes (Vulpes vulpes) and Feral Cats (Felis catus); the loss or degradation of host plants for the fungi that the species feeds on as a result of the impacts of Phytophthora cinnamomi; clearing of vegetation adjacent to Two Peoples Bay; and the lack of recruitment of young to the adult population. Gilbert's Potoroo is also potentially threatened by a catastrophic fire.

Ongoing Threats

Feral predators
Gilbert's Potoroo is within the Critical Weight Range (0.035–5 kg) of mammals thought to be most susceptible to decline (Burbidge & McKenzie 1989). It is in the prey size range of European Red Foxes and Feral Cats, both of which are known to occur in the Two Peoples Bay area (Courtenay & Friend 2004).

Dieback disease (Phytophthora cinnamomi)
Gilbert's Potoroo is believed to be present only in areas of the Two Peoples Bay Nature Reserve that are free of Phytophthora infection. Dieback disease can cause considerable changes to the floristic structure of the habitat. Gilbert's Potoroo feeds primarily on hypogeal fungi, many of which are mycorrhizal. Plant dieback disease is considered to be a major threat to the continued survival of Gilbert's Potoroo by altering vegetation structure or eliminating species that are hosts to the mycorrhizal fungi on which they feed (Courtenay & Friend 2004).

Clearing of vegetation
The population of Gilbert's Potoroo on the Mount Gardner headland has the potential to expand through the dispersal of young through adjacent bushland corridors into suitable habitat nearby (especially near Mount Manypeaks). Some of this linking bushland occurs on private land and these corridors require protection from clearing to increase the opportunity for successful dispersal to new areas (Courtenay & Friend 2004). The clearing of suitable habitat that may contain undiscovered populations, or in which Gilbert's Potoroo could in the future be reintroduced or dispersed, is also considered to be a threat (TSSC 2004c).

Low recruitment of young
Between 60–80% of Gilbert's Potoroo pouch-young do not attain maturity (Friend 2008) and there is concern that the reasons for low recruitment of young to the adult population are not known (TSSC 2004c).

Potential Threat

Fire
The only known wild population of Gilbert's Potoroo exists in dense, long unburnt vegetation that is potentially highly vulnerable to wildfire. Fire exclusion is thus an extremely high priority in the protection of the wild population. The captive colony was established at least partly to provide insurance against the loss of the single known population through a catastrophic fire event (Courtenay & Friend 2004).

Gilbert's Potoroo (Potorous gilbertii) Recovery Plan July 2003–June 2008 (Courtenay & Friend 2004) suggests that the key strategies for the recovery of Gilbert's Potoroo include ensuring the persistence of the single known wild population, and increasing the number of locations at which the species occurs. This will require the following measures:

  • Protect the existing wild population and habitat:
    • conduct aerial and/or ground baiting to control European Red Foxes
    • investigate improved methods for Feral Cat control
    • conduct fire management according to the existing plan
    • conduct regular monitoring of the main colonies on Mt Gardner
    • undertake community education on the need for fire protection and baiting at Two Peoples Bay.
  • Increase understanding of ecology and population biology of Gilbert's Potoroo to underpin management strategies:
    • investigate the population biology of the species in the wild with particular emphasis on the fate of juveniles
    • examine the ecology of the wild population including diet, habitat requirements and social organisation
    • investigate the effect of Phytophthora infection on habitat suitability.
  • Search for new populations of Gilbert's Potoroo outside Two Peoples Bay:
    • conduct surveys of suitable habitat in parts of the species' former range
    • encourage community groups to conduct hair-arch surveys outside Two Peoples Bay and provide training in techniques and support for community funding applications.
  • Establish a self-sustaining captive breeding colony of Gilbert's Potoroo:
    • establish and maintain one or more captive breeding colony of Gilbert's Potoroo for breeding, research, reintroduction and security
    • carry out nutritional analysis of at least five species of truffle-like fungi eaten by the species and redesign captive diet
    • continue to research, improve and develop husbandry techniques to maximise health and reproductive potential of the species
    • investigate and manage veterinary issues of importance to the captive husbandry of Gilbert's Potoroo
    • establish and maintain a studbook for the species
    • develop a draft captive management strategy for the species.
  • Develop techniques to enhance the reproductive potential of Gilbert's Potoroo:
    • gather information on reproductive biology, growth and development of the species to apply to the application of reproductive techniques and breeding enhancement for reintroduction purposes
    • trial and review natural reproduction options at Two Peoples Bay
    • develop techniques and protocols for cross-fostering pouch-young between potoroid species
    • develop semen collection and artificial insemination techniques, and evaluation protocols for Gilbert's Potoroo.
  • Enhance the breeding capacity of Gilbert's Potoroo:
    • establish an intensive, or semi-wild, colony of surrogate potoroid species near Albany
    • implement cross-fostering from wild Gilbert's Potoroo females on Mt Gardner to captive surrogate females
    • establish an appropriate area for the species to acclimatise before reintroduction into the wild
    • implement artificial insemination procedures to increase the reproductive rates in the captive colony
    • develop a gene bank to retain genetic diversity in both captive and wild populations.
  • Extend the range of Gilbert's Potoroo through translocation of animals to suitable habitat outside Two Peoples Bay:
    • plan a reintroduction strategy for captive-bred Gilbert's Potoroos
    • select and prepare translocation sites (e.g. baiting, fire management etc.).
  • Secure ongoing funding for the implementation of the recovery actions.

The following documents may inform on protection and management of Gilbert's Potoroo:

  • Gilbert's Potoroo (Potorous gilbertii) Recovery Plan July 2003–June 2008 (Courtenay & Friend 2004)
  • Threat Abatement Plan for predation by the European Red Rox (DEWHA 2008adf)
  • Threat Abatement Plan for predation by Feral Cats (DEWHA 2008adg)
  • Threat Abatement Plan for Dieback Caused by the Root-rot Fungus Phytophthora cinnamomi (EA 2001l)
  • Two Peoples Bay Nature Reserve Management Plan 1995–2005 (WA CALM 1995).

The following table lists known and perceived threats to this species. Threats are based on the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN) threat classification version 1.1.

Threat Class Threatening Species References
Agriculture and Aquaculture:Agriculture and Aquaculture:Land clearing, habitat fragmentation and/or habitat degradation Commonwealth Listing Advice on Potorous gilbertii (Gilbert's Potoroo) (Threatened Species Scientific Committee (TSSC), 2004c) [Listing Advice].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive Non-Native/Alien Species:Competition and/or predation Vulpes vulpes (Red Fox, Fox) Conservation status of mammals and birds in southwestern Australian forests. I. Is there evidence of direct links between forestry practices and species decline and extinction?. Pacific Conservation Biology. 4:296-314. (Calver, M.C.C. & J. Dell, 1998) [Journal].
Gilbert's Potoroo Recovery Plan 1998-2007 (Courtenay, J., T. Start & A. Burbidge, 1998) [State Recovery Plan].
Commonwealth Listing Advice on Potorous gilbertii (Gilbert's Potoroo) (Threatened Species Scientific Committee (TSSC), 2004c) [Listing Advice].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive Non-Native/Alien Species:Competition and/or predation Felis catus (Cat, House Cat, Domestic Cat) Gilbert's Potoroo Recovery Plan 1998-2007 (Courtenay, J., T. Start & A. Burbidge, 1998) [State Recovery Plan].
The 1996 Action Plan for Australian Marsupials and Monotremes (Maxwell, S., A.A. Burbidge & K. Morris, 1996) [Cwlth Action Plan].
Commonwealth Listing Advice on Potorous gilbertii (Gilbert's Potoroo) (Threatened Species Scientific Committee (TSSC), 2004c) [Listing Advice].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive Non-Native/Alien Species:Vegetation and habitat loss caused by dieback Phytophthora cinnamomi The 1996 Action Plan for Australian Marsupials and Monotremes (Maxwell, S., A.A. Burbidge & K. Morris, 1996) [Cwlth Action Plan].
Natural System Modifications:Fire and Fire Suppression:Inappropriate and/or changed fire regimes (frequency, timing, intensity) Commonwealth Listing Advice on Potorous gilbertii (Gilbert's Potoroo) (Threatened Species Scientific Committee (TSSC), 2004c) [Listing Advice].
Natural System Modifications:Fire and Fire Suppression:Inappropriate prescribed regimes and/or vegetation management to control fire regimes The 1996 Action Plan for Australian Marsupials and Monotremes (Maxwell, S., A.A. Burbidge & K. Morris, 1996) [Cwlth Action Plan].
Natural System Modifications:Other Ecosystem Modifications:Vegetation and habitat mortality caused by dieback Commonwealth Listing Advice on Potorous gilbertii (Gilbert's Potoroo) (Threatened Species Scientific Committee (TSSC), 2004c) [Listing Advice].
Species Stresses:Indirect Species Effects:Low numbers of individuals Commonwealth Listing Advice on Potorous gilbertii (Gilbert's Potoroo) (Threatened Species Scientific Committee (TSSC), 2004c) [Listing Advice].

Bougher, N. & T. Friend (2009q). Gilbert's potoroo translocated to new areas find their fungi. Information Sheet 4/2009. [Online]. Perth, Western Australia: Science Division, Department of Environment and Conservation. Available from: http://www.dec.wa.gov.au/index2.php?option=com_docman&task=doc_view&gid=3314&Itemid=7.

Burbidge, A.A. & N.L. McKenzie (1989). Patterns in the modern decline of Western Australia's vertebrate fauna: causes and conservation implications. Biological Conservation. 50:143-198.

Courtenay, J. & T. Friend (2004). Gilbert's Potoroo (Potorous gilbertii) Recovery Plan July 2003-June 2008. [Online]. Wanneroo, Western Australia: Threatened Species Unit, Department of Conservation and Land Management. Available from: http://www.environment.gov.au/biodiversity/threatened/publications/recovery/p-gilbertii/index.html.

Courtenay, J., A. Start & E. Sinclair (1996). An update on the status of Gilbert's potoroo. In: Newsletter of the Australian Mammal Society. November:11.

Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities (DSEWPaC) (2011j). Survey guidelines for Australia's threatened mammals. EPBC Act survey guidelines 6.5. [Online]. EPBC Act policy statement: Canberra, ACT: DSEWPAC. Available from: http://www.environment.gov.au/epbc/publications/threatened-mammals.html.

Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts (DEWHA) (2008zzp). Threat Abatement Plan for predation by feral cats. [Online]. Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts. Available from: http://www.environment.gov.au/biodiversity/threatened/publications/tap/cats08.html.

Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts (DEWHA) (2008zzq). Threat Abatement Plan for Predation by the European Red Fox. [Online]. Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts. Available from: http://www.environment.gov.au/biodiversity/threatened/publications/tap/foxes08.html.

Environment Australia (EA) (2001m). Threat Abatement Plan for Dieback Caused by the Root-rot Fungus Phytophthora cinnamomi. [Online]. Available from: http://www.environment.gov.au/biodiversity/threatened/publications/tap/phytophthora.html.

Friend, J.A. (2008). Gilbert's Potoroo. In: Van Dyck S., & R. Strahan, eds. The Mammals of Australia. 3rd ed. Page(s) 297-298. Sydney, NSW: Reed New Holland.

Friend, T. (2008a). Cross-fostering Gilbert's potoroo. Landscope. 23(3):6-8.

Maxwell, S., A.A. Burbidge & K. Morris (1996). The 1996 Action Plan for Australian Marsupials and Monotremes. [Online]. Wildlife Australia, Environment Australia. Available from: http://www.environment.gov.au/resource/action-plan-australian-marsupials-and-monotremes.

McGhee, K (2007). The good fight. Australian Geographic. 88:104-117.

Schoch, K. (2007). Saving our species, saving our state. Landscope. 22 (4):10-16.

Sinclair, E.A. & M. Westerman (1997). Phylogenetic relationships within the genus Potorous (Marsupialia: Potoroidae) based on allozyme electrophoresis and sequence analysis of the Cytochrome b gene. Journal of Mammalian Evolution. 4:147-161.

Sinclair, E.A., A. Danks & A.F. Wayne (1996). Rediscovery of Gilbert's potoroo, Potorous tridactylus, in Western Australia . Australian Mammalogy. 19: 69-72.

Threatened Species Scientific Committee (TSSC) (2004c). Commonwealth Listing Advice on Potorous gilbertii (Gilbert's Potoroo). [Online]. Available from: http://www.environment.gov.au/biodiversity/threatened/species/gilberts-potoroo.html.

Western Australia Department of Conservation and Land Management (WA CALM) (1995). Two Peoples Bay Nature Reserve Management Plan 1995-2005. [Online]. Perth, Western Australia: National Parks and Nature Conservation Authority. Available from: http://www.naturebase.net/pdf/nature/management/two_peoples_bay.pdf.

Western Australia Department of Environment and Conservation (WA DEC) (2009j). Vital Government funding for critically endangered species. [Online]. Western Australia: Department of Environment and Conservation. Available from: http://www.dec.wa.gov.au/content/view/5441/1560/.

Western Australia Department of Environment and Conservation (WA DEC) (2009k). Gilbert's Potoroo Information Sheet. [Online]. Albany, Western Australia: Deptartment of Environment and Conservation. Available from: http://www.dec.wa.gov.au/content/view/2979/1969/1/2/.

Western Australia Department of Environment and Conservation (WA DEC) (2009l). Gilbert's Potoroo. [Online]. Albany, Western Australia: Department of Environment and Conservation. Available from: http://www.dec.wa.gov.au/content/view/2979/1969/.

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This database is designed to provide statutory, biological and ecological information on species and ecological communities, migratory species, marine species, and species and species products subject to international trade and commercial use protected under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (the EPBC Act). It has been compiled from a range of sources including listing advice, recovery plans, published literature and individual experts. While reasonable efforts have been made to ensure the accuracy of the information, no guarantee is given, nor responsibility taken, by the Commonwealth for its accuracy, currency or completeness. The Commonwealth does not accept any responsibility for any loss or damage that may be occasioned directly or indirectly through the use of, or reliance on, the information contained in this database. The information contained in this database does not necessarily represent the views of the Commonwealth. This database is not intended to be a complete source of information on the matters it deals with. Individuals and organisations should consider all the available information, including that available from other sources, in deciding whether there is a need to make a referral or apply for a permit or exemption under the EPBC Act.

Citation: Department of the Environment (2014). Potorous gilbertii in Species Profile and Threats Database, Department of the Environment, Canberra. Available from: http://www.environment.gov.au/sprat. Accessed Sat, 26 Jul 2014 17:13:09 +1000.