Biodiversity

Species Profile and Threats Database


For information to assist proponents in referral, environmental assessments and compliance issues, refer to the Policy Statements and Guidelines (where available), the Conservation Advice (where available) or the Listing Advice (where available).
 
In addition, proponents and land managers should refer to the Recovery Plan (where available) or the Conservation Advice (where available) for recovery, mitigation and conservation information.

EPBC Act Listing Status Listed as Vulnerable
Recovery Plan Decision Recovery Plan required, included on the Commenced List (1/11/2009).
 
Adopted/Made Recovery Plans
Other EPBC Act Plans Threat Abatement Plan for predation by feral cats (Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts (DEWHA), 2008zzp) [Threat Abatement Plan].
 
Threat Abatement Plan for Predation by the European Red Fox (Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts (DEWHA), 2008zzq) [Threat Abatement Plan].
 
Policy Statements and Guidelines Survey guidelines for Australia's threatened mammals. EPBC Act survey guidelines 6.5 (Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities (DSEWPaC), 2011j) [Admin Guideline].
 
Federal Register of
    Legislative Instruments
Declaration under s178, s181, and s183 of the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 - List of threatened species, List of threatened ecological communities and List of threatening processes (Commonwealth of Australia, 2000) [Legislative Instrument].
 
State Government
    Documents and Websites
NSW:Long-nosed Potoroo - profile (NSW Department of Environment, Climate Change and Water (NSW DECCW), 2005ju) [Internet].
QLD:Long-nosed potoroo (Department of Environment and Heritage Protection (DEHP), 2013al) [Database].
VIC:Action Statement No. 254 Long-nosed Potoroo Potorous tridactylus (Department of Environment and Primary Industry (DEPI), 2013) [State Action Plan].
State Listing Status
NSW: Listed as Vulnerable* (Threatened Species Conservation Act 1995 (New South Wales): December 2013 list)
QLD: Listed as Vulnerable (Nature Conservation Act 1992 (Queensland): May 2014 list)
SA: Listed as Endangered* (National Parks and Wildlife Act 1972 (South Australia): June 2011 list)
VIC: Listed as Threatened (Flora and Fauna Guarantee Act 1988 (Victoria): February 2014 list)
Non-statutory Listing Status
VIC: Listed as Near Threatened (Advisory List of Threatened Vertebrate Fauna in Victoria: 2013 list)
Scientific name Potorous tridactylus tridactylus [66645]
Family Potoroidae:Diprotodonta:Mammalia:Chordata:Animalia
Species author  
Infraspecies author  
Reference G.J. Frankham, K.A. Handasyde & M.D.B. Eldridge (2012). Novel insights into the phylogenetic relationships of the endangered marsupia genus Potorous. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 64: 592-602
Distribution map Species Distribution Map

This is an indicative distribution map of the present distribution of the species based on best available knowledge. See map caveat for more information.

Illustrations Google Images

New South Wales: At the species level, Potorous tridactylus is listed as Vulnerable under the Threatened Species Conservation Act 1995.

South Australia: At the species level, Potorous tridactylus is listed as Endangered under the National Parks and Wildlife Act 1972.

Scientific name: Potorous tridactylus tridactylus

Common name: Long-nosed Potoroo (SE Mainland)

Other names: Long-nosed Rat-kangaroo, Wallaby Rat

Molecular work by Frankham and colleagues (2012) splits Potorous tridactylus tridactylus into two taxa: P. t. tridactylus (central NSW to southern Queensland) and P. t. trisulcatus (southern NSW, Victoria). For the purposes of the EPBC Act, the subspecies is treated as occurring between southern Queensland and Victoria.

The Long-nosed Potoroo (SE Mainland) is a medium sized marsupial of the order Diprotodontia. There is considerable variation between sizes in males and females. Males and females have a body length (excluding the tail) between 287–410 mm and 259–378 mm respectively. Tail lengths range between 204–262 mm (males) and 198–254 mm (females) with males (740–1640g) being typically heavier than females (660–1350g). The Long-nosed Potoroo (SE Mainland) can be identified by a brown to grey upper body and paler underbody. They have a long nose that tapers with a small patch of skin extending from the snout to the nose. The length of the feet is shorter than their head length. They are smaller than the Long-footed Potoroo (Potorous longipes) (Van Dyck & Strahan 2008).

Victoria
The distribution of Long-nosed Potoroos (SE mainland) has been well documented through trapping surveys and observations. In Victoria the Long-nosed Potoroo (SE Mainland) occurs in six discrete regions (Seebeck 1981), including the South-western region, Grampians, Otways, Western Port, Wilsons Promontory and east Gippsland.

South-western region
Historical records and fossil collections indicate the Long-nosed Potoroo (SE Mainland) originally occupied Fern Cave, McEacherns Cave, Natural Bridge, Mount Eccles, Bushfield and Tower Hill beach. Modern records and trappings reveal populations at Kentbruck Heath, Lower Glenelg National Park, Bat Ridges State Faunal Reserve, Cashmore, Greenwald, Mount Clay, Heathmere, Cobboboonee Forest, Boundary Road, South Portland, Gorae and Gorae West. Sightings have also been reported at Wanwin, Lower Glenelg National Park, Drik Drik, The Inkpot and Tyrendarra.

Grampians region
Historically the Long-nosed Potoroo (SE Mainland) occupied the Victoria Range. Today, however, populations are distributed in a small area around Pomonal. Sightings have also been reported al Lake Fyans.

Otways region
Fossil records and remains indicate the Long-nosed Potoroo (SE Mainland) was originally distributed at Mount Hamilton, Swains Cave, Mount Porndon, Three Mile Beach, and south of Nullawarre. Modern distributions include Naringal East, Ecklin South, Glenfyne, Jancourt, Timboon, Peterborough, the Parker River inlet, Aire Valley, Turtons Track, Benwerrin, Barwon Downs, Hordern Vale, Gellibrand River, Charleys Creek, Lorne and Aireys Inlet. It has been sighted at Gervoc, Bullahaare, the Simpson Heytesbury district, Crayfish Bay, Blanket Bay and Moonlight Head.

Western Port region
Historical records indicate the Long-nosed Potoroo (SE Mainland) occurred around Swan Lake and Philip Island. Today the species can still be found on Phillip Island as well as French Island.

Wilsons Promontory region
Long-nosed Potoroo (SE Mainland) specimens have been obtained from Lilly Pilly Gully, Halfway Hut, Lighthouse Road, Frazer Creek, Sealers Cove, Refuge Cove and Waterloo Bay.

East Gippsland Region
Historical records indicate the Long-nosed Potoroo (SE Mainland) once occupied areas near Buchan, Murrindal and Mallacoota. Modern distributions are found around Bairnsdale, Nungurner, Lakes Entrance, Lake Bunga, Lake Tyers, Ewing Marsh, Bete Bolong, Corringle, Gabbage Tree, the Sydenham Inlet, Temboon Inlet, Red River, Sandpatch Point and the Mallacoota Inlet.

NSW and Queensland
The Long-nosed Potoroo (SE Mainland) has scattered populations extending from south-eastern Queensland through to NSW. The species has been recorded at Many Peaks Range, south-east of Gladstone, Bellthorpe near Beerwah and in the Border Ranges (Amos 1982). It has also been seen at Bulburin, south-west of Miriam Vale (Lindenmayer & Viggers 1994) and in the Lamington National Park and surrounds (Queensland Regional NRM Groups' Collective 2013b). In NSW it has been seen at several locations (Mason 1997). The Queensland populations are considered to be reasonably secure (Amos 1982). Only one detailed study is available for NSW. The population at Tyagarah was estimated to be around 80–90 and was considered to be insecure (Mason 1997). The status and security of other NSW populations is uncertain.

Population information is limited. In regions in which it occurs its density has been estimated as 0.19–2.55 animals/ha. The sex ratio is estimated at 1.63 M/F (Seebeck et.al. 2007).

Victorian Habitat
Seebeck (1981) provides a detailed study of the Victorian habitats of the Long-nosed Potoroo (SE Mainland) in each of the six populations.

South-western region
The Long-nosed Potoroo (SE Mainland) has been observed in open forests and the ecotones between them. Most sites were dominated by either Eucalyptus obliqua or E. baxteri. There were also E. ovata and E. viminalis however these were less common. The average tree height was approximately 20 m, however, at poorer sites the trees only reached 5 m. The soils were highly acidic clay soils with a thin layer of sand.

Grampians region
The Long-nosed Potoroos (SE Mainland) habitat in this region is dominated by heath-woodland with an abundance of Eucalyptus oblique and E. aromaphloia. E. baxteri was present in some places. The tree height ranged from 10–15 m with a 2 m tall shrub layer consisting of Acacia spp., Banksia marginata and Leptospermum juniperinum. The soils in this region have a leached sandy profile and are highly acidic.

Otways region
In this region its habitat is dominated by stringybark eucalypts, Eucalyptus oblique or E. baxteri. Near watercourses or poorly drained areas, E. ovata and E. viminalis were commonly found. The habitat was characterized by a dense low shrub layer of Acacia verticillata and Banksia marginata. The region had acidic sandy or sandy loam soils overlaying a variety of sub-soils.

Western Port region
Most Long-nosed Potoroos (SE Mainland) in the region have been found in areas of heath-woodland or open forest. These sites are developed, relatively dry, well drained old dunes to heavier soils in low-lying areas. The regions are often flooded during the winter. Most sites contained Eucalyptus obliqua on higher sites or E. obliqua and E. viminalis in wetter areas. The trees ranged from 7–13 m tall.

Wilsons Promontory region
Most specimens of the Long-nosed Potoroo (SE Mainland) have been collected in areas of heath-woodland grading into heath. The dominant tree species are the Eucalyptus obliqua and E. baxteri. E. radiata is sometime present. The tree height ranges from 5–15 m with an open or sparse canopy. The soils are sandy loams overlying leached sand soils or brown gradational soils.

East Gippsland region
The Long-nosed Potoroo (SE Mainland) is found in both open forest and woodland and the ecotone in-between. It is found in areas containing Eucalyptus sieberi, E. globoidea, E. muellerana, E. baxteri and E. cypellocarpa. Tree height varies from 20–40 m. The soils in the region are generally acidic soils and leached sand.

NSW and Queensland
The Long-nosed Potoroo (SE Mainland) is sparsely distributed along the coast and Great Dividing Range of south-east Queensland through NSW (Van Dyck & Strahan 2008). There is limited information about the species habitat in Queensland and NSW. There is no consistent pattern to the habitat of the Long-nosed Potoroo (SE Mainland); it can be found in wet eucalypt forests (Seebeck 1995b) to coastal heaths and scrubs (Mason 1997). The main factors would appear to be access to some form of dense vegetation for shelter (Bennett 1987) and the presence of an abundant supply of fungi for food (Claridge et al. 1992).

The main microhabitat criteria for the Long-nosed Potoroo (SE Mainland) appears to be the availability of dense vegetation for cover which allow it to persist in an otherwise open or patchy habitat (Bennett 1987, 1993). The Long-nosed Potoroo (SE mainland) breeds all year round both in captivity and in the wild (Bennett 1987; Hughes 1962). A single young is born after a gestation of 37 days, or 29 days from removal of pouch young (Hughes 1962). Twins have been reported (Johnson & Buchmann 1993). Pouch life is about 100–125 days and sexual maturity achieved at about 12 months. The Long-nosed Potoroo (SE Mainland) can live to 10 years (Hughes 1962).

Like all Potoroos, fungi are the major component of the diet. The Long-nosed Potoroo (SE Mainland) is known to consume vascular plant components including the flower, fruit, seed, leaf, stem, root and bulb. It feeds on both hypogeous and epigeous components of fungal fruit bodies. The Long-nosed Potoroo (SE Mainland) is also known to feed on invertebrates. Rabbits also feed on fungi. There is no evidence to suggest that grazing competition from rabbits is affecting Potoroo numbers (Seekbeck et al. 2007).

Specific feeding studies
A study at Naringal in south-western Victoria found that there was considerable seasonal variation in diet, with fungi being the primary component in winter, seeds a secondary component and arthropods and plant parts of lesser importance. In summer arthropods, fungi and vascular plants were approximately equal in importance (Bennett & Baxter 1989).

In a study in East Gippsland, Victoria, the spores of 33 different fungal species were identified in the faeces of the Long-nosed Potoroo (SE Mainland). Experiments confirmed that spores carried in the faeces were viable and that Potoroos are probably an important agent in maintaining the fungal-plant symbiosis (Claridge et al. 1992, 1993).

Feeding behaviour of the Tasmanian subspecies was observed by Vernes and Jarman (2014). It was found the truffles are dug up using a synchronous forepaw movement, picked up with the mouth or forepaws and cleaned of debris before being consumed (Vernes & Jarman 2014). Truffles were usually dug up within 2.4 seconds and if unsuccessful at recovering a truffle, digging occurred for 4.8 seconds. Potoroos were successful at recovering a truffle in 76% of digging attempts, and once they had located a cache of buried truffles, achieved a rate of recovery of ~2.4 truffles per minute (Vernes & Jarman 2014).

In south-western Victoria, home ranges of females had values of 1.4 ha and males 2.0 ha. Overlap was considerable in both within-sex and between-sex comparisons (Bennett 1987).

The Survey guidelines for Australia's threatened mammals (DSEWPaC 2011j) includes survey design principles when planning a mammal survey and includes recommendations for survey methods for the Long-nosed Potoroo (SE mainland) and habitat that it occurs in (DSEWPaC 2011j). The following information is additional to the guidelines.

Research in Richmond Range National Park indicates that horizontal cameras in still mode have great potential for monitoring the dynamics of the subspecies (Taylor et al. 2014). A horizontal stills camera could achieve a 95% probability of detection of a potoroo within 6 days compared with 8 days using a vertical stills camera (Taylor et al. 2014).

Present threats
Geographical separation and isolation is identified as the main threat to the Long-nosed Potoroo (SE Mainland). Isolated populations face inherent difficulties in breeding. Seebeck and colleagues (2007) identify the following reasons behind the isolation:

  • predation by European Red Foxes (Vulpes vulpes) and Feral Cats (Felis catus)
  • residential and industrial development
  • natural disasters.

Historical background to present threats
Of the 11 rat-kangaroo species identified at the time of European settlement, two are extinct. A further two are located only on offshore islands and the distribution of all other species is reduced. Early farmers viewed the Potoroos as a pest, responsible for raiding gardens and crop fields. Farmers used a variety of methods to resolve the problem (Seebeck et al. 2007), including:

  • Baiting: the use of poisoned pollard and sulphur was particularly successful. Poisoning was used near newly found cotton settlements. Reports indicate 'scores of thousands' were killed in this way.
  • Shooting: the Pasture Protection Boards of NSW paid bounties for Potoroos. From 1880–1920 an estimated three million rat-kangaroos were killed for bounties.

Despite the baiting and shooting of the Potoroos, a detailed analysis of bounty records revealed a decline in payments made from 1908–1910. Despite this, no correlation between the reduction in payments and an increase in sheep numbers, or improvement in crop pastures could be found. This lead to the conclusion that despite baiting and shooting, the decline in Potoroos was due to introduced predators (i.e. cats and foxes). Indeed cats and foxes were initially introduced by farmers to control the number native wildlife deemed as 'pests.' Foxes were able to spread throughout the entire NSW in 10–15 years. By 1918, all animals of open habitat were all but extinct due to fox predation (Seebeck et al. 2007).

There have been several major projects aimed at reducing threatening processes associated with native wildlife. Projects aimed at eradicating feral species are of particular importance for the species. Project Deliverance was a project funded by the Victorian Government and focused on fox eradication. The project was a precursor to the wider Southern Ark project and had two main objectives:

  • To develop and implement a baiting strategy to effectively reduce the abundance of foxes in large areas of native forests.
  • To assess changes in abundance (if any) of native mammals species at risk from fox predation.

Three geographically distinct sites were chosen to place the bait; the West Coast, East Coast and Stony Peak sites. Over 300 bait stations were set up at these sites. Results indicate a clear decline in fox numbers in each region. Studies have indicated a significant increase in the number of Long-nosed Potoroos (SE Mainland) in the region. Prior to the commencement of baiting (in 1999) trapping surveys on average collected two Long-nosed Potoroos (SE Mainland). After the introduction of bait, trapping surveys collected up to 25 Potoroos (Murray et.al. 2006). Baiting began in 1999 and ceased in 2003.

The more widespread Project Southern Ark was the first large-scale fox control program in south-eastern Australia. The project was the follow on from Project Deliverence and is ongoing. Many years of research have contributed the implementation of the project and clearly demonstrate the benefits that fox control has on the ecosystem. The project is similair to that of Project Deliverence, however, it is conducted over a much wider area (1 000 000 ha). Trapping results indicate an increase in Potoroo numbers corresponding to a decrease in fox numbers (DSE 2003d).

Project Glenelg Ark is similar to the Southern Ark Project, however, it is conducted over a much smaller area (100 000 ha). The project is now in its sixth year, having begun in 2004. The aim of the project is to substantially reduce fox numbers across 100 000 ha of State forest and National Park in the far south-west of Victoria. With reduced levels of fox predation an increase in native wildlife populations is expected. To date, the project has been considerably successful, with native populations (including the Long-nosed Potoroo (SE Mainland) increasing and, in some areas, colonising new regions (Robley et al. 2008).

Victoria and NSW have entered into 20 year agreements on forestry management (regional forest agreements) which, in concert with Commonwealth, aim to (Seebeck et al. 2007):

  • identify reserve systems within a region and provide conservation for those areas
  • provide ecologically sustainable management of forests within the RFA region
  • provide long term stability of the forests and forest industries.

The Long-nosed Potoroo (SE Mainland) has been given consideration under these agreements and are benefiting from the establishment of conservation areas (Seebeck et al. 2007).

Fox baiting in NSW has reduced the predation pressure on the Long-nosed Potoroos (SE Mainland). Heavy baiting takes place year round at the Ben Boyd National Park, the adjacent East Boyd State Forest. Baiting also occurs near Eden and Barren Grounds. No baiting occurs in the Nadgee Wilderness as Foxes remain in low density and have little effect on Potoroo populations (Seebeck et al. 2007).

The Long-nosed Potoroo (SE Mainland) also receives protection in Commonwealth and state parks and reserves (Seebeck et al. 2007)

A comprehensive summary of research into the Long-nosed Potoroo (SE Mainland) can be found in Seebeck and colleagues (2007). The book also contains a reference list of all major studies for all subspecies of the Potoroo.

Relevant management documentation from the department includes:

  • Threat Abatement Plan for predation by the European red fox (DEWHA 2008zzq)
  • Threat Abatement Plan for predation by feral cats (DEWHA 2008zzp).

The following table lists known and perceived threats to this species. Threats are based on the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN) threat classification version 1.1.

Threat Class Threatening Species References
Agriculture and Aquaculture:Livestock Farming and Grazing:Grazing pressures and associated habitat changes Border Ranges Rainforest Biodiversity Management Plan - NSW & Queensland (NSW Department of Environment, Climate Change and Water (NSW DECCW), 2010n) [State Recovery Plan].
Northern Rivers Regional Biodiversity Management Plan (NSW Department of Environment, Climate Change and Water (NSW DECCW), 2010p) [State Recovery Plan].
Biological Resource Use:Logging and Wood Harvesting:Habitat disturbance due to foresty activities Potorous tridactylus tridactylusin Species Profile and Threats (SPRAT) database (Department of the Environment and Heritage, 2006ud) [Internet].
Biological Resource Use:Logging and Wood Harvesting:Habitat loss, modification and degradation due to timber harvesting Northern Rivers Regional Biodiversity Management Plan (NSW Department of Environment, Climate Change and Water (NSW DECCW), 2010p) [State Recovery Plan].
Climate Change and Severe Weather:Habitat Shifting and Alteration:Habitat loss, modification and/or degradation Border Ranges Rainforest Biodiversity Management Plan - NSW & Queensland (NSW Department of Environment, Climate Change and Water (NSW DECCW), 2010n) [State Recovery Plan].
Northern Rivers Regional Biodiversity Management Plan (NSW Department of Environment, Climate Change and Water (NSW DECCW), 2010p) [State Recovery Plan].
Ecosystem/Community Stresses:Indirect Ecosystem Effects:Loss and/or fragmentation of habitat and/or subpopulations Border Ranges Rainforest Biodiversity Management Plan - NSW & Queensland (NSW Department of Environment, Climate Change and Water (NSW DECCW), 2010n) [State Recovery Plan].
Northern Rivers Regional Biodiversity Management Plan (NSW Department of Environment, Climate Change and Water (NSW DECCW), 2010p) [State Recovery Plan].
Human Intrusions and Disturbance:Human Intrusions and Disturbance:Human induced disturbance due to unspecified activities Border Ranges Rainforest Biodiversity Management Plan - NSW & Queensland (NSW Department of Environment, Climate Change and Water (NSW DECCW), 2010n) [State Recovery Plan].
Northern Rivers Regional Biodiversity Management Plan (NSW Department of Environment, Climate Change and Water (NSW DECCW), 2010p) [State Recovery Plan].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive Non-Native/Alien Species:Competition and/or habitat degradation by weeds Border Ranges Rainforest Biodiversity Management Plan - NSW & Queensland (NSW Department of Environment, Climate Change and Water (NSW DECCW), 2010n) [State Recovery Plan].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive Non-Native/Alien Species:Competition and/or predation Vulpes vulpes (Red Fox, Fox) Potorous tridactylus tridactylusin Species Profile and Threats (SPRAT) database (Department of the Environment and Heritage, 2006ud) [Internet].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive Non-Native/Alien Species:Competition and/or predation Felis catus (Cat, House Cat, Domestic Cat) Potorous tridactylus tridactylusin Species Profile and Threats (SPRAT) database (Department of the Environment and Heritage, 2006ud) [Internet].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive Non-Native/Alien Species:Competition and/or predation Canis lupus familiaris (Domestic Dog) Potorous tridactylus tridactylusin Species Profile and Threats (SPRAT) database (Department of the Environment and Heritage, 2006ud) [Internet].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Predation, competition, habitat degradation and/or spread of pathogens by introduced species Border Ranges Rainforest Biodiversity Management Plan - NSW & Queensland (NSW Department of Environment, Climate Change and Water (NSW DECCW), 2010n) [State Recovery Plan].
Northern Rivers Regional Biodiversity Management Plan (NSW Department of Environment, Climate Change and Water (NSW DECCW), 2010p) [State Recovery Plan].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Presence of pathogens and resulting disease Border Ranges Rainforest Biodiversity Management Plan - NSW & Queensland (NSW Department of Environment, Climate Change and Water (NSW DECCW), 2010n) [State Recovery Plan].
Natural System Modifications:Fire and Fire Suppression:Inappropriate and/or changed fire regimes (frequency, timing, intensity) Potorous tridactylus tridactylusin Species Profile and Threats (SPRAT) database (Department of the Environment and Heritage, 2006ud) [Internet].
Border Ranges Rainforest Biodiversity Management Plan - NSW & Queensland (NSW Department of Environment, Climate Change and Water (NSW DECCW), 2010n) [State Recovery Plan].
Northern Rivers Regional Biodiversity Management Plan (NSW Department of Environment, Climate Change and Water (NSW DECCW), 2010p) [State Recovery Plan].
Natural System Modifications:Other Ecosystem Modifications:Habitat dieback associated with bell miners Manorina melanophrys (Bell Miner) Border Ranges Rainforest Biodiversity Management Plan - NSW & Queensland (NSW Department of Environment, Climate Change and Water (NSW DECCW), 2010n) [State Recovery Plan].
Natural System Modifications:Other Ecosystem Modifications:Vegetation and habitat mortality caused by dieback Northern Rivers Regional Biodiversity Management Plan (NSW Department of Environment, Climate Change and Water (NSW DECCW), 2010p) [State Recovery Plan].

Amos, P.J. (1982). The potoroo in Queensland. Queensland Agricultural Journal. 108: 5-6.

Bennett, A.F. (1987). Conservation of mammals within a fragmented forest environment: the contributions of insular biogeography and autecology. In: Saunders, D.A., G.W. Arnold, A.A. Burbridge & A.J.M. Hopkins, eds. Nature conservation: the role of remnants of native vegetation. Page(s) 41-52. Chipping Norton, NSW: Surrey Beatty & Sons.

Bennett, A.F. (1993). Microhabitat use by the long-nosed potoroo, Potorous tridactylus, and other small mammals in remnant forest vegetation of south-western Victoria . Wildlife Research. 20: 267-285.

Bennett, A.F. & B.J. Baxter (1989). Diet of the long-nosed potoroo, Potorous tridactylus (Marsupialia: Potoroidae), in south-western Victoria. Australian Wildlife Research. 16:263-271.

Claridge, A.W., M.T. Tanton & R.B. Cunningham (1993). Hypogeal fungi in the diet of the long-nosed potoroo (Potorous tridactylus) in mixed-species and regrowth eucalypt forest stands in south-eastern Australia. Wildlife Research. 20: 321-337.

Claridge, A.W., M.T. Tanton, J.H. Seebeck, S.J. Cork & R.B. Cunningham (1992). Establishment of ectomycorrhizae on the roots of two species of Eucalyptus from fungal spores contained in the faeces of the long-nosed potoroo (Potorous tridactylus). Australian Journal of Ecology. 17: 207-217.

Department of Environment and Primary Industry (DEPI) (2013). Action Statement No. 254 Long-nosed Potoroo Potorous tridactylus. [Online]. Flora and Fauna Guarantee Act 1988. The State of Victoria. Available from: http://www.depi.vic.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0005/249764/LNP-ActionStatement-web.pdf.

Department of Sustainability and Environment (DSE) (2003d). The Project Southern Ark Brochure. [Online]. Available from: http://www.land.vic.gov.au/dse/nrence.nsf/FID/-3BBC62CBEDB61A01CA256DCD00023C66?OpenDocument.

Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities (DSEWPaC) (2011j). Survey guidelines for Australia's threatened mammals. EPBC Act survey guidelines 6.5. [Online]. EPBC Act policy statement: Canberra, ACT: DSEWPAC. Available from: http://www.environment.gov.au/epbc/publications/threatened-mammals.html.

Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts (DEWHA) (2008zzp). Threat Abatement Plan for predation by feral cats. [Online]. Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts. Available from: http://www.environment.gov.au/biodiversity/threatened/publications/tap/cats08.html.

Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts (DEWHA) (2008zzq). Threat Abatement Plan for Predation by the European Red Fox. [Online]. Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts. Available from: http://www.environment.gov.au/biodiversity/threatened/publications/tap/foxes08.html.

Frankham, G.J., K.A. Handasyde & M.D.B. Eldridge (2012). Novel insights into the phylogenetic relationships of the endangered marsupial genus Potorous. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution. 64(3):592-602.

Hughes, R.L. (1962). Reproduction in the macropod marsupial Potorous tridactylus (Kerr). Australian Journal of Zoology. 10:192-224.

Johnson, S.D. & O.L.K.A. Buchmann (1993). First record of the concurrent presence of sibling pouch young in free-living potoroo (Potorous tridactylus). Mammalia. 57: 441-444.

Lindenmayer, D.B. & K.L. Viggers (1994). Northern range limits of the long nosed potoroo, Potorous tridactylus. Memoirs of the Queensland Museum. 35:180.

Mason, R.J. (1997). Habitat use and population size of the long-nosed potoroo, Potorous tridactylus (Marsupialia: Potoroidae) in a coastal reserve, north-eastern New South Wales. Australian Mammalogy. 20:35-42.

Murray, A.J., R.N. Poore & N. Dexter (2006). Project Deliverance-the response of 'critical weight range' mammals to effective fox control in mesic forest habitats in far East Gippsland, Victoria. Melbourne, Department of Sustainability and Environment.

Queensland Regional NRM Groups' Collective (2013). Federally funded project welcomes long-nosed potaroo.

Robley, A., A. Gormley, R. Albert, M. Bowd, A. Smith & M. Scroggie (2008). Monitoring and Evaluation of Glenelg Ark - 2004 to 2008. In: Arthur Rylah Institute for Environmental Research Technical Report Series No. 183. Heidelberg, Victoria, Department of Sustainability and Environment.

Seebeck, J.H. (1981). Potorous tridactylus (Kerr) (Marsupialia: Macropodidae): its distribution, status and habitat preferences in Victoria . Australian Wildlife Research. 8: 285-306.

Seebeck, J.H. (1995b). Long-footed potoroo. In: Menkhorst, P, ed. Mammals of Victoria. Page(s) 129-131. Melbourne, Oxford UP.

Seebeck, J.H., A. Claridge & R. Rose (2007). Bettongs, Potoroos and the Musky Rat-Kangaroo. CSIRO Publishing, Collingwood, Australia.

Taylor, B.D., R.L. Goldingay & J.M. Lindsay (2014). Horizontal or vertical? Camera trap orientations and recording modes for detecting potoroos, bandicoots and pademelons. Australian Mammalogy. 36:60-66.

Van Dyck, S. & R. Strahan (2008). The Mammals of Australia, Third Edition. Page(s) 880. Sydney: Reed New Holland.

Vernes, K. & P. Jarman (2014). Long-nosed potoroo (Potorous tridactylus) behaviour and handling times when foraging for buried truffles. Australian Mammalogy. 36(1):128-130.

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This database is designed to provide statutory, biological and ecological information on species and ecological communities, migratory species, marine species, and species and species products subject to international trade and commercial use protected under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (the EPBC Act). It has been compiled from a range of sources including listing advice, recovery plans, published literature and individual experts. While reasonable efforts have been made to ensure the accuracy of the information, no guarantee is given, nor responsibility taken, by the Commonwealth for its accuracy, currency or completeness. The Commonwealth does not accept any responsibility for any loss or damage that may be occasioned directly or indirectly through the use of, or reliance on, the information contained in this database. The information contained in this database does not necessarily represent the views of the Commonwealth. This database is not intended to be a complete source of information on the matters it deals with. Individuals and organisations should consider all the available information, including that available from other sources, in deciding whether there is a need to make a referral or apply for a permit or exemption under the EPBC Act.

Citation: Department of the Environment (2014). Potorous tridactylus tridactylus in Species Profile and Threats Database, Department of the Environment, Canberra. Available from: http://www.environment.gov.au/sprat. Accessed Wed, 3 Sep 2014 17:02:24 +1000.