Biodiversity

Species Profile and Threats Database


For information to assist proponents in referral, environmental assessments and compliance issues, refer to the Policy Statements and Guidelines (where available), the Conservation Advice (where available) or the Listing Advice (where available).
 
In addition, proponents and land managers should refer to the Recovery Plan (where available) or the Conservation Advice (where available) for recovery, mitigation and conservation information.

EPBC Act Listing Status Listed as Critically Endangered as Neopasiphae simplicior
Listing and Conservation Advices Commonwealth Listing Advice on Neopasiphae simplicior (Threatened Species Scientific Committee (TSSC), 2008aej) [Listing Advice].
 
Commonwealth Conservation Advice on Neopasiphae simplicior (Threatened Species Scientific Committee (TSSC), 2008afi) [Conservation Advice].
 
Recovery Plan Decision Recovery Plan not required, occurs entirely within a managed nature reserve. Therefore the approved Conservation Advice for the species provides sufficient direction to implement priority actions and manage the threats of clearing, draining of winter-wet depressions and fire (19/12/2008).
 
Adopted/Made Recovery Plans
Federal Register of
    Legislative Instruments
Inclusion of species in the list of threatened species under section 178 of the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (69) (19/12/2008) (Commonwealth of Australia, 2008d) [Legislative Instrument] as Neopasiphae simplicior.
 
State Listing Status
WA: Listed as Endangered (Wildlife Conservation Act 1950 (Western Australia): September 2013 list) as Neopasiphae simplicior
Scientific name Neopasiphae simplicior [66821]
Family Colletidae:Hymenoptera:Insecta:Arthropoda:Animalia
Species author Michener, 1965
Infraspecies author  
Reference ANZECC Threatened Fauna List May 2000
Other names Neopasiphe simplicior [66765]
Distribution map Species Distribution Map

This is an indicative distribution map of the present distribution of the species based on best available knowledge. See map caveat for more information.

Illustrations Google Images

Scientific Name: Neopasiphae simplicior

Neopasiphae simplicior is a black short-tongued bee that is of a smaller size and has less-modified antennae and legs than other species belonging to the same genus (congeneric). Males are 7 mm in length, with a wing length of 5 mm (Michener 1965).

Neopasiphae simplicior is restricted in range, and is thought to only occur in a single location within the bushland of the Forrestdale Lake Nature Reserve adjacent to Forrestdale Lake and the Armadale Golf Course, with a previous population known from Cannington (Perth's southern suburbs). Forrestdale Lake is located on the southern fringes of Perth's metropolitan area, and is one of the few remaining examples of the lakes and vegetation originally found on the Swan Coastal Plain. Only 20% of all the wetlands that once existed now remain, therefore it is likely that suitable habitat for this species has been cleared (Houston 1994).

The current extent of occurrence is approximately 1 km² within the Forrestdale Lake Nature Reserve. No other extant populations are known, with the only previous record from Cannington in 1954 (Houston 1994). Given that the Cannington population is presumed to be extinct this suggests a significant decline in the historical extent of occurrence for the species.

The area of occupancy for Neopasiphae simplicior is the same as area of occurrence (approximately 1 km²) given that the species is known from only one location.

Intense collecting in the Perth region has failed to locate Neopasiphae simplicior (Houston 1994). The bulk of the Western Australia Museum's bee collection has been acquired in the last 70 years, with significant contributions by T. Houston since 1978 (Houston 2000).

Neopasiphae simplicior has only been collected from three sites, near Forrestdale Lake (approximately 25 km south-east of Perth in the City of Armadale), the Armadale Golf Course in 1987 and at Cannington (Perth's southern suburbs) in 1954 (Houston 1994).

The species is thought to occur as a single population within the bushland of the Forrestdale Lake Nature Reserve adjacent to Forrestdale Lake and the Armadale Golf Course, though specimens were collected from a second population in 1954 at Cannington (Houston 1994).

Since the collection of specimens at Cannington in 1954 the population trend is suspected to be in decline, in both area of occupancy and total population size.

The Forrestdale Lake Nature Reserve bushland population is of high importance as it is likely to represent the sole remaining population of this species on the Swan Coastal Plain.

The single extant population occurs within the Forrestdale Lake Nature Reserve, a Class A Reserve of 245 hectares, gazetted for the Conservation of Flora and Fauna.The Reserve is not actively managed for Neopasiphae simplicior, with the primary emphasis on management directed towards the protection and enhancement of waterbird habitat (CCWA & CALM 2005).

Neopasiphae simplicior has been collected at flowers of;

  • Thread-leaved Goodenia (Goodenia filiformis), an erect to ascending, slender perennial herb up to 0.25 m high, occurring on sandy soils and winter-wet depression, flowering between November to January
  • Slender Lobelia (Lobelia tenuior), a slender erect annual herb to 0.5 m high, occurring on sand dunes, coastal limestone and low-lying areas, flowering between October to January
  • Angianthus preissianus, an erect or prostrate annual herb up to 0.16 m high, occurring on sand and clay and favouring saline habitats, winter-wet flats, claypans and granite rocks, flowering between October to December
  • Velleia sp. (Houston 2000; Western Australian Herbarium undated).

    The Forrestdale Lake Nature Reserve lies on the Bassandean dunes of the Swan Coastal Plain, vegetated largely by banksia woodlands and low closed forests of swamp paperbarks (CCWA & CALM 2005).

    Male Neopasiphae simplicior roost overnight in flowers of Asteraceae, and in most cases, the flowers are low-growing ephemerals (Houston 2000).

    Neopasiphae simplicior occurs in two listed threatened ecological communities, known as Type 8 'Herb-rich shrublands in clay pans' listed in Western Australia as Vulnerable and Type 10a 'Shrublands on dry clay flats' listed in Western Australia as Endangered (CCWA & CALM 2005).

    Neopasiphae simplicior is also associated with listed threatened species, including another short-tongued bee Leioproctus douglasiellus, Carnaby's Black Cockatoo (Calyptorhyncus latirostris), Purdie's Donkey Orchid (Diuris purdiei), Glossy-leaved Hammer Orchid (Drakaea elastica) and five Priority flora species (one Priority 1; Acacia lasitocarpa subsp. Bracteolata, and four Priority 4; Villarsia submersa, Drosera occidentalis, Verticordia lindleyi subsp. lindleyi and Anthotium junciforme) (Government of Western Australia 2000a).

    The Forrestdale Lake Nature Reserve is one of the most important conservation areas in south-western Western Australia as a habitat and refuge for water-birds and is representative of wetland areas of the Swan Coastal Plain that are poorly reserved in the Perth Metropolitan area. This site also has important Aboriginal heritage, plant communities representative of the eastern side of the Swan Coastal Plain and natural and cultural values close to urban centres. Forrestdale Lake, along with Thomsons Lake, was included on the List of Wetlands of International Importance known as the Convention on Wetlands in 1990 (CCWA & CALM 2005; Ramsar Secretariat 2009).

  • Neopasiphae simplicior may rely upon the flowers of Goodenia filiformis, Lobelia tenuior and (males only) Angianthus preissianus (Houston 2000), which flower between October to January (Western Australian Herbarium undated).

    Movement patterns for Neopasiphae simplicior are unknown, although the majority of native bees are solitary (Houston 2000).

    Neopasiphae simplicior differs from the similar species N. mirabilis and N. insignis by its smaller size and less-modified antennae and legs (Michener 1965).

    General collecting methods for bees should be used, which include brush sweeping, and observations at flowering sites during summer months. Survey effort may be best directed at areas where the flowering plants Goodenia filiformis, Lobelia tenuior, Angianthus preissianus and Velleia sp. are abundant, and at a time when they are flowering (between October to January) as Neopasiphae simplicior has been collected in conjunction with these plants (Houston 2000).

    Houston (1994) listed past, current and future threats as including: land clearing of bush-land for housing and rural and industrial uses; draining of winter-wet depressions; and fire.

    An additional threat to many species of native bees is possible competition with introduced honeybees (Houston 2000). In the past land clearing was likely to be a threat to this species by destroying its habitat, which is considered to be associated with winter-wet depressions. Eighty percent of the wetlands that were once present on the Swan Coastal Plain prior to European settlement have been cleared, filled, drained or developed. Of the wetlands that remain, some have not retained their ecological values due to the concentration of urban and agricultural development in the region. Forrestdale Lake is a Class A Nature Reserve, included in the directory of important wetlands in Australia, it is a conservation category wetland and listed as a Ramsar site, therefore it is unlikely that this area will be cleared in the future. Fire is recognised as a current and future potential threat to wetland values by changing/disturbing the habitat, which may result in the replacement of native vegetation with weeds (Houston 1994; TSSC 2008aej; TSSC 2008afi).

    A large fire event would be catastrophic for the species if the fire destroyed the entire suitable habitat for this species. A fire management and response plan is being developed for Forrestdale Lake and will include actions and strategies to protect environmentally sensitive areas and pre-suppression activities to reduce the likelihood fire.

    Minister's Reasons for Recovery Plan decision
    Neopasiphae simplicior occurs entirely within a managed nature reserve. Therefore the approved Conservation Advice for the species provides sufficient direction to implement priority actions and manage the threats of clearing, draining of winter-wet depressions and fire. A recovery plan is not considered to be necessary at this time.

    The Management Plan for the Forrestdale Lake Nature Reserve (CCWA & CALM 2005) outlines management objectives that are directed towards the protection and enhancement of waterbird habitat that may indirectly benefit the conservation of Neopasiphae simplicior, including: fire protection measures, control of off-road vehicle use and regional impacts from horses, the control of dieback disease, the control of exotic pest species, rehabilitation of natural vegetation and limitation of public use (CCWA & CALM 2005).

    Priority recovery and threat abatement actions identified by the Threatened Species Scientific Committee (TSSC 2008afi) that would support the recovery of Neopasiphae simplicior include:

  • Design and implement a monitoring program.
  • Protect areas of native vegetation which contain populations of Neopasiphae simplicior or which could support populations in the future.
  • Develop and implement a suitable fire management strategy for Neopasiphae simplicior.
  • Undertake survey work in suitable habitat and potential habitat to locate any additional populations/occurrences/remnants.
  • Ensure no inappropriate build up of woody debris or herbaceous debris, which could act as fuel for a potential fire.

  • Detailed morphological information and taxonomic description is provided by Michener (1965).

    The Forrestdale Lake Nature Reserve Management Plan 2005 (CCWA & CALM 2005).

    The following table lists known and perceived threats to this species. Threats are based on the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN) threat classification version 1.1.

    Threat Class Threatening Species References
    Agriculture and Aquaculture:Agriculture and Aquaculture:Land clearing, habitat fragmentation and/or habitat degradation Commonwealth Listing Advice on Neopasiphae simplicior (Threatened Species Scientific Committee (TSSC), 2008aej) [Listing Advice].
    Commonwealth Conservation Advice on Neopasiphae simplicior (Threatened Species Scientific Committee (TSSC), 2008afi) [Conservation Advice].
    Ecosystem/Community Stresses:Indirect Ecosystem Effects:Restricted geographical distribution (area of occupancy and extent of occurrence) Commonwealth Listing Advice on Neopasiphae simplicior (Threatened Species Scientific Committee (TSSC), 2008aej) [Listing Advice].
    Commonwealth Conservation Advice on Neopasiphae simplicior (Threatened Species Scientific Committee (TSSC), 2008afi) [Conservation Advice].
    Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive Non-Native/Alien Species:Competition and/or habitat degradation Apis mellifera (Honey Bee, Apiary Bee) Commonwealth Listing Advice on Neopasiphae simplicior (Threatened Species Scientific Committee (TSSC), 2008aej) [Listing Advice].
    Commonwealth Conservation Advice on Neopasiphae simplicior (Threatened Species Scientific Committee (TSSC), 2008afi) [Conservation Advice].
    Natural System Modifications:Dams and Water Management/Use:Changes in hydrology including habitat drainage Commonwealth Listing Advice on Neopasiphae simplicior (Threatened Species Scientific Committee (TSSC), 2008aej) [Listing Advice].
    Commonwealth Conservation Advice on Neopasiphae simplicior (Threatened Species Scientific Committee (TSSC), 2008afi) [Conservation Advice].
    Natural System Modifications:Fire and Fire Suppression:Inappropriate and/or changed fire regimes (frequency, timing, intensity) Commonwealth Listing Advice on Neopasiphae simplicior (Threatened Species Scientific Committee (TSSC), 2008aej) [Listing Advice].
    Commonwealth Conservation Advice on Neopasiphae simplicior (Threatened Species Scientific Committee (TSSC), 2008afi) [Conservation Advice].
    Residential and Commercial Development:Commercial and Industrial Areas:Recreational, commercial and industrial development Commonwealth Listing Advice on Neopasiphae simplicior (Threatened Species Scientific Committee (TSSC), 2008aej) [Listing Advice].
    Residential and Commercial Development:Housing and Urban Areas:Habitat loss, modification and fragmentation due to urban development Commonwealth Listing Advice on Neopasiphae simplicior (Threatened Species Scientific Committee (TSSC), 2008aej) [Listing Advice].
    Residential and Commercial Development:Residential and Commercial Development:Habitat modification (clearance and degradation) due to urban development Commonwealth Conservation Advice on Neopasiphae simplicior (Threatened Species Scientific Committee (TSSC), 2008afi) [Conservation Advice].

    Conservation Commission of Western Australia and Department of Conservation and Land Management (CCWA & CALM) (2005). Forrestdale Lake Nature Reserve Management Plan 2005. [Online]. Perth, Department of Conservation and Land Management. Available from: http://www.dec.wa.gov.au/index2.php?option=com_docman&task=doc_view&gid=3255&Itemid=99999999.

    Government of Western Australia (2000a). Bush Forever - Volume 2 Directory of Bush Forever Sites. Perth, Department of Environmental Protection.

    Houston, T.F. (1994). Proposed addition deletion or change to the schedules of declared threatened or specially protected fauna or the reserve list. Neopasiphae simplicior. Perth, Department of Conservation and Land Management.

    Houston, T.F. (2000). Native Bees on Wildflowers in Western Australia. Special Publication No. 2 of the Western Australian Insect Study Society Inc. Perth, WA Museum.

    Michener, C.D. (1965). Bees. Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History. 130:262-3.

    Ramsar Secretariat (2009). The Ramsar List of Wetlands of International Importance. Key Documents of the Ramsar Convention. [Online]. Available from: http://www.ramsar.org/key_sitelist.htm. [Accessed: 10-Feb-2009].

    Threatened Species Scientific Committee (TSSC) (2008aej). Commonwealth Listing Advice on Neopasiphae simplicior. [Online]. Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts. Available from: http://www.environment.gov.au/biodiversity/threatened/species/pubs/66821-listing-advice.pdf.

    Threatened Species Scientific Committee (TSSC) (2008afi). Commonwealth Conservation Advice on Neopasiphae simplicior. [Online]. Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts. Available from: http://www.environment.gov.au/biodiversity/threatened/species/pubs/66821-conservation-advice.pdf.

    Western Australian Herbarium (n.d.). FloraBase - The Western Australian Flora. [Online]. Western Australia, Department of Conservation and Land Management. Available from: http://florabase.calm.wa.gov.au/.

    EPBC Act email updates can be received via the Communities for Communities newsletter and the EPBC Act newsletter.

    This database is designed to provide statutory, biological and ecological information on species and ecological communities, migratory species, marine species, and species and species products subject to international trade and commercial use protected under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (the EPBC Act). It has been compiled from a range of sources including listing advice, recovery plans, published literature and individual experts. While reasonable efforts have been made to ensure the accuracy of the information, no guarantee is given, nor responsibility taken, by the Commonwealth for its accuracy, currency or completeness. The Commonwealth does not accept any responsibility for any loss or damage that may be occasioned directly or indirectly through the use of, or reliance on, the information contained in this database. The information contained in this database does not necessarily represent the views of the Commonwealth. This database is not intended to be a complete source of information on the matters it deals with. Individuals and organisations should consider all the available information, including that available from other sources, in deciding whether there is a need to make a referral or apply for a permit or exemption under the EPBC Act.

    Citation: Department of the Environment (2014). Neopasiphae simplicior in Species Profile and Threats Database, Department of the Environment, Canberra. Available from: http://www.environment.gov.au/sprat. Accessed Fri, 25 Jul 2014 04:22:03 +1000.