Biodiversity

Species Profile and Threats Database


For information to assist proponents in referral, environmental assessments and compliance issues, refer to the Policy Statements and Guidelines (where available), the Conservation Advice (where available) or the Listing Advice (where available).
 
In addition, proponents and land managers should refer to the Recovery Plan (where available) or the Conservation Advice (where available) for recovery, mitigation and conservation information.

EPBC Act Listing Status Listed as Critically Endangered
Listing and Conservation Advices Commonwealth Listing Advice on Lasiopetalum sp. Proston (J.A.Baker 17) (Proston Lasiopetalum) (Threatened Species Scientific Committee (TSSC), 2010a) [Listing Advice].
 
Commonwealth Conservation Advice on Lasiopetalum sp. Proston (J.A.Baker 17) (Proston Lasiopetalum) (Threatened Species Scientific Committee (TSSC), 2010b) [Conservation Advice].
 
Recovery Plan Decision Recovery Plan not required, the approved conservation advice for the species provides sufficient direction to implement priority actions and mitigate against key threats (09/02/2010).
 
Adopted/Made Recovery Plans
Federal Register of
    Legislative Instruments
Inclusion of species in the list of threatened species under section 178 of the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (91) (09/02/2010) (Commonwealth of Australia, 2010k) [Legislative Instrument].
 
State Government
    Documents and Websites
QLD:Survey of Threatened Plant Species in South-East Queensland Biographical Region (Halford, D., 1998) [Report].
State Listing Status
QLD: Listed as Endangered (Nature Conservation Act 1992 (Queensland): July 2012)
Scientific name Lasiopetalum sp. Proston (J.A.Baker 17) [68391]
Family Sterculiaceae:Malvales:Magnoliopsida:Magnoliophyta:Plantae
Species author Qld Herbarium
Infraspecies author  
Reference  
Distribution map Species Distribution Map

This is an indicative distribution map of the present distribution of the species based on best available knowledge. See map caveat for more information.

Illustrations Google Images

Scientific name: Lasiopetalum sp. Proston (J.A.Baker 17)

Common name: Proston Lasiopetalum

The species is conventionally accepted as Lasiopetalum sp. Proston (J.A.Baker 17) (CHAH 2009).

Lasiopetalum sp. Proston (J.A.Baker 17) was previously known as Lasiopetalum macrophyllum (TSSC 2010a).

The Proston Lasiopetalum is a perennial, erect multi-stemmed shrub growing to 2.5 m. The leaves have oblong blades with a rounded apex and base, and are 2–7 cm long and 0.5–2 cm wide. The leaves are covered in fine hairs on the upper surface and cottony hairs on the undersurface. It has dark pink flowers in dense inflorescences, 5–8 mm in length with cottony hairs on the outside and hairless on the inside of the flower. The fruits are ovoid, up to 4 mm in length and dehiscent (Stanley & Ross 1986).

The Proston Lasiopetalum is only known from two discrete patches of one population, about 6.5 km north-east of Proston in southeast Queensland. The species is found within an area of approximately 20 ha. Survey data shows there has been a reduction in the area of occupancy of the species from approximately 50 ha in 1997 to approximately 20 ha in 2002 (TSSC 2010a).

This species occurs within the Burnett-Mary (QLD) Natural Resource Management Region and the South Eastern Queensland Interim Biogeographic Regionalisation for Australia Bioregion (TSSC 2010a).

The total population of the Proston Lasiopetalum was approximately 3600 plants in October 2002. It is suspected that population numbers were much greater in the past and have been reduced primarily as a result of vegetation clearance for agricultural production (Halford 1998). However, there are no historical population data to confirm this conclusion. The estimated total number of mature individuals of the Proston Lasiopetalum is not known (TSSC 2010a). Survey data shows there has been a reduction in the area of occupancy of the species from approximately 50 ha in 1997, to approximately 20 ha in 2002. This represents a suspected severe reduction in population numbers, based on a 60% reduction in the area of occupancy of the species (TSSC 2010a).

The Proston Lasiopetalum occurs in open eucalypt forest on red, volcanic loamy soils on basalt. It is found at altitudes of approximately 500 m and is associated with species such as Red Ironbark (Eucalyptus fibrosa), Yarraman Ironbark (E. melanoleuca), Western Yellow Stringybark (E. apothalassica), Lemon-scented Gum (Corymbia citriodora subsp. variegata) and Grove's Paperbark (Melaleuca groveana) (Halford 1998; Forster 2002a).

The Proston Lasiopetalum flowers in spring from September–November and fruiting occurs during late summer to autumn. It also has the capacity for vegetative reproduction, particularly in response to disturbance. The pollinating mechanism is unknown, but it is suspected to be via insects. The longevity and viability of the seeds, as well as the plant's life expectancy, are unknown. The species has little or no apparent long-range dispersal ability (Halford 1998; Forster 2002a).

The key threats to the Proston Lasiopetalum are vegetation clearance for agricultural production, and vegetation clearance and physical damage to plants associated with road works, roadside maintenance, and utilities development and maintenance (such as for water/ gas infrastructure, telephone and powerlines) (TSSC 2010a).

Land clearing

The clearing of vegetation for agricultural production has been the primary cause of the decline of the species in the past (Halford 1998). This threat continues to affect this species on freehold land in the form of clearing of regrowth vegetation for agricultural production. Much of the population of the Proston Lasiopetalum is found on public land beside roads and on utility corridors. These remnants are too small to be mapped and protected under the Queensland Vegetation Management Act 1999. The effect of these threats has been the steady, cumulative loss of a small number of plants, which has had an impact on the extent of the population. Dr Paul Forster (Qld Herbarium) states that there is the potential for the species to be cleared to extinction by road works, roadside maintenance and utilities development and maintenance (Forster 2009, pers. comm., cited in TSSC 2010a).

Other potential threats

Other threats potentially affecting the Proston Lasiopetalum include weed invasion and drift of agricultural chemicals (TSSC 2010a).

Minister's Reasons for Recovery Plan Decision

A recovery plan for the species is not considered to be necessary at this time, as the approved conservation advice for the species provides sufficient direction to implement priority actions and mitigate against key threats. The Commonwealth Conservation Advice on Lasiopetalum sp. Proston (J.A.Baker 17) (Proston Lasiopetalum) (TSSC 2010b) outlines the following research priorities:

  • Design and implement a monitoring program or, if appropriate, support and enhance existing programs.
  • Assess population size, distribution, ecological requirements and the relative impacts of threatening processes.
  • Undertake seed germination and vegetative propagation trials to determine the requirements for successful establishment.
  • Assess the species' response to fire in terms of whether the species requires fire for reproduction or is eliminated by fire.

In addition, the Commonwealth Conservation Advice on Lasiopetalum sp. Proston (J.A.Baker 17) (Proston Lasiopetalum)(TSSC 2010b) outlines the following priority actions:

  • Monitor known populations to identify key threats.
  • Monitor the progress of recovery, including the effectiveness of management actions and the need to adapt them if necessary.
  • Ensure no disturbance in areas of occurrence, excluding necessary actions to manage the conservation of the species.
  • Undertake survey work in suitable habitat and potential habitat to locate any additional populations/occurrences/remnants.
  • Investigate formal conservation arrangements, management agreements or covenants on private land, and for crown and private land investigate inclusion in reserve tenure if possible.
  • Suitably control and manage access on private land and other land tenure.
  • Minimise adverse impacts from land use at known sites.
  • Identify and remove weeds in the local area, which could become a threat to the Proston Lasiopetalum, using appropriate methods.
  • Manage sites to prevent introduction of invasive weeds, which could become a threat to the Proston Lasiopetalum, using appropriate methods.
  • Ensure chemicals or other mechanisms used to eradicate weeds do not have a significant adverse impact on the Proston Lasiopetalum.
  • Develop and implement a suitable fire management strategy for the Proston Lasiopetalum.
  • Where appropriate, provide maps of known occurrence to local and state Rural Fire Services and seek inclusion of mitigative measures in bush fire risk management plans, risk register and/or operation maps.
  • Raise awareness of the Proston Lasiopetalum within the local community. Consider the need for fact sheets/information brochures/ field days in conjunction with known industry or community interest groups.
  • An awareness strategy could include the following interest groups: South Burnett Regional Council, Kingaroy and District Branch of SGAP, Burnett Mary (QLD) NRM Group, Queensland Environment Protection Authority.
  • Signpost vegetation in vicinity of populations on road reserves as environmentally significant to prevent accidental damage by road maintenance crews.
  • Inform local council and adjacent land managers of the location of the Proston Lasiopetalum in their area.
  • Frequently engage with private landholders and land managers responsible for the land on which populations occur and encourage these key stakeholders to contribute to the implementation of conservation management actions.
  • Undertake appropriate seed collection and storage.
  • Investigate options for linking, enhancing or establishing additional populations.
  • Implement national translocation protocols (Vallee et al. 2004) if establishing additional populations is considered necessary and feasible.

The Commonwealth Conservation Advice on Lasiopetalum sp. Proston (J.A.Baker 17) (Proston Lasiopetalum) (TSSC 2010b) provides a brief biological overview and management recommendations.

The following table lists known and perceived threats to this species. Threats are based on the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN) threat classification version 1.1.

Threat Class Threatening Species References
Agriculture and Aquaculture:Agriculture and Aquaculture:Land clearing, habitat fragmentation and/or habitat degradation Commonwealth Listing Advice on Lasiopetalum sp. Proston (J.A.Baker 17) (Proston Lasiopetalum) (Threatened Species Scientific Committee (TSSC), 2010a) [Listing Advice].
Invasive and Other Problematic Species and Genes:Invasive Non-Native/Alien Species:Competition and/or habitat degradation by weeds Commonwealth Listing Advice on Lasiopetalum sp. Proston (J.A.Baker 17) (Proston Lasiopetalum) (Threatened Species Scientific Committee (TSSC), 2010a) [Listing Advice].
Pollution:Airborne Agricultural pollutants:Unspecified pollutants Commonwealth Listing Advice on Lasiopetalum sp. Proston (J.A.Baker 17) (Proston Lasiopetalum) (Threatened Species Scientific Committee (TSSC), 2010a) [Listing Advice].
Transportation and Service Corridors:Roads and Railroads:Development and/or maintenance of roads Commonwealth Listing Advice on Lasiopetalum sp. Proston (J.A.Baker 17) (Proston Lasiopetalum) (Threatened Species Scientific Committee (TSSC), 2010a) [Listing Advice].
Transportation and Service Corridors:Utility and Service Lines:Habitat modification due to construction and maintenance of gas pipeline easement Commonwealth Listing Advice on Lasiopetalum sp. Proston (J.A.Baker 17) (Proston Lasiopetalum) (Threatened Species Scientific Committee (TSSC), 2010a) [Listing Advice].
Transportation and Service Corridors:Utility and Service Lines:Habitat modification due to maintenance of water pipeline easement Commonwealth Listing Advice on Lasiopetalum sp. Proston (J.A.Baker 17) (Proston Lasiopetalum) (Threatened Species Scientific Committee (TSSC), 2010a) [Listing Advice].
Transportation and Service Corridors:Utility and Service Lines:Powerline easement maintenance and construction; mortality due to collision with powerlines Commonwealth Listing Advice on Lasiopetalum sp. Proston (J.A.Baker 17) (Proston Lasiopetalum) (Threatened Species Scientific Committee (TSSC), 2010a) [Listing Advice].

Forster, P.I. (2002a). Distribution and Conservation Status of Lasiopetalum sp. Proston (J.A.Baker 17) (Sterculiaceae). Brisbane, Queensland: QLD EPA.

Halford, D. (1998). Survey of Threatened Plant Species in South-East Queensland Biographical Region. [Online]. Brisbane: Queensland CRA/RFA Steering Committee. Available from: http://www.daff.gov.au/rfa/regions/qld/environment/threatened-plant.

Stanley, T.D. & E.M. Ross (1986). Flora of south-eastern Queensland. Volume Two. Brisbane, Queensland: Department of Primary Industries.

Threatened Species Scientific Committee (TSSC) (2010a). Commonwealth Listing Advice on Lasiopetalum sp. Proston (J.A.Baker 17) (Proston Lasiopetalum). [Online]. Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts. Canberra, ACT: Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts. Available from: http://www.environment.gov.au/biodiversity/threatened/species/pubs/68391-listing-advice.pdf.

Threatened Species Scientific Committee (TSSC) (2010b). Commonwealth Conservation Advice on Lasiopetalum sp. Proston (J.A.Baker 17) (Proston Lasiopetalum). [Online]. Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts. Canberra, ACT: Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts. Available from: http://www.environment.gov.au/biodiversity/threatened/species/pubs/68391-conservation-advice.pdf.

Vallee, L., T. Hogbin, L. Monks, B. Makinson, M. Matthes & M. Rossetto (2004). Guidelines for the translocation of threatened plants in Australia - Second Edition. Canberra, ACT: Australian Network for Plant Conservation.

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This database is designed to provide statutory, biological and ecological information on species and ecological communities, migratory species, marine species, and species and species products subject to international trade and commercial use protected under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (the EPBC Act). It has been compiled from a range of sources including listing advice, recovery plans, published literature and individual experts. While reasonable efforts have been made to ensure the accuracy of the information, no guarantee is given, nor responsibility taken, by the Commonwealth for its accuracy, currency or completeness. The Commonwealth does not accept any responsibility for any loss or damage that may be occasioned directly or indirectly through the use of, or reliance on, the information contained in this database. The information contained in this database does not necessarily represent the views of the Commonwealth. This database is not intended to be a complete source of information on the matters it deals with. Individuals and organisations should consider all the available information, including that available from other sources, in deciding whether there is a need to make a referral or apply for a permit or exemption under the EPBC Act.

Citation: Department of the Environment (2014). Lasiopetalum sp. Proston (J.A.Baker 17) in Species Profile and Threats Database, Department of the Environment, Canberra. Available from: http://www.environment.gov.au/sprat. Accessed Fri, 18 Apr 2014 00:50:28 +1000.