Biodiversity

Species Profile and Threats Database


For information to assist proponents in referral, environmental assessments and compliance issues, refer to the Policy Statements and Guidelines (where available), the Conservation Advice (where available) or the Listing Advice (where available).
 
In addition, proponents and land managers should refer to the Recovery Plan (where available) or the Conservation Advice (where available) for recovery, mitigation and conservation information.

EPBC Act Listing Status Listed as Critically Endangered as Prasophyllum bagoense
Listing and Conservation Advices Commonwealth Conservation Advice on Prasophyllum bagoense (Bago Leek-orchid) (Threatened Species Scientific Committee (TSSC), 2012v) [Conservation Advice].
 
Commonwealth Listing Advice on Prasophyllum bagoense (Bago Leek-orchid) (Threatened Species Scientific Committee (TSSC), 2012w) [Listing Advice].
 
Recovery Plan Decision Recovery Plan not required, the approved conservation advice for the species provides sufficient direction to implement priority actions and mitigate against key threats (03/04/2012).
 
Adopted/Made Recovery Plans
Policy Statements and Guidelines Draft survey guidelines for Australia's threatened orchids (Department of the Environment, 2013b) [Admin Guideline].
 
Federal Register of
    Legislative Instruments
Amendment to the list of threatened species under section 178 of the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (130) (03/04/2012) (Commonwealth of Australia, 2012j) [Legislative Instrument] as Prasophyllum bagoense.
 
State Government
    Documents and Websites
NSW:Prasophyllum bagoensis (an orchid) - endangered species listing - final determination (New South Wales Scientific Committee (NSW SC), 2004) [Report].
State Listing Status
NSW: Listed as Endangered (Threatened Species Conservation Act 1995 (New South Wales): December 2013 list) as Prasophyllum bagoensis
Scientific name Prasophyllum bagoense [84276]
Family Orchidaceae:Orchidales:Liliopsida:Magnoliophyta:Plantae
Species author D.L.Jones
Infraspecies author  
Reference  
Other names Prasophyllum bagoensis [78896]
Distribution map Species Distribution Map

This is an indicative distribution map of the present distribution of the species based on best available knowledge. See map caveat for more information.

Illustrations Google Images

Scientific name: Prasophyllum bagoense

Common name: Bago Leek-orchid

Prasophyllum bagoensis is conventionally accepted(CHAH 2011).

The Bago Leek-orchid is a slender, tuberous, terrestrial herb growing singly or in loose groups, with an erect leaf 20–35 cm long, and 15–30 pale tawny-green, sometimes pink, scented flowers in a moderately dense spike. The species is easily identified by its strongly twisted and recurved dorsal sepal (outermost green part of the flower on the backside), upswept petals and s-shaped labellum (prominent petal) (Jones 2000, 2006).

The Bago Leek-orchid is endemic to NSW, and is currently known from a single population at McPhersons Plain, east of Tumbarumba in the Southern Tablelands. It was recorded in the 1970s at a site approximately 5 km away (Logan 2005 pers. comm. cited in TSSC 2012w), but no plants were found at the site during surveys in 2003, 2004 and 2005 and this subpopulation is now thought be to extinct (Branwhite 2009 pers. comm. cited in TSSC 2012w). Despite targeted surveys of similar habitat within a 100 km radius it has not been located at any other site. The majority of plants occur on the Brandy Marys Bago State Forest crown leases with a few plants on adjoining private property and the adjacent Bago State Forest (Branwhite 2009 pers. comm. cited in TSSC 2012w).

The Bago Leek-orchid's extent of occurrence and area of occupancy are less than 1 km² (TSSC 2012w).

Annual surveys of the Bago Leek-orchid have been conducted since 1999 (Beretta 2012; Branwhite 2009 pers. comm. cited in TSSC 2012w). During the flowering seasons of 2000 and 2003, between 20–80 mature individuals were found (NSW SC 2004). In 2008, only six mature plants were found, whilst in 2010, after good seasonal rains, 30–40 plants were found (Branwhite 2009 pers. comm. cited in TSSC 2012w).

The Bago Leek-orchid's habitat is a sub-alpine treeless plain at an elevation of approximately 1200 m above sea level (TSSC 2012w). The species occurs in wet grassland dominated by Tussock Grass (Poa labillardierei), Fine-leaved Snow Grass (Poa clivicola) and Snow Grass (Poa sieberiana) (Beretta 2012; NSW OEH 2012).

The habitat that the species occurs in comprises at least four plant communities: fen; aquatic sedgeland – alpine bog community; tall wet heathland; and McPhersons Plain open heathland (McDougall 2004 unpub. cited in TSSC 2012w). The species also extends into adjacent Snow Gum (Eucalyptus pauciflora) woodland (Branwhite 2009 pers. comm. cited in TSSC 2012w) and grows in moist to wet shallow clay loam (Jones 2000, 2006).

The Bago Leek-orchid flowers from December to January and fruits from December to March (seasonally dependent). Plants are insect-pollinated, probably by a wasp species and they are not known to reproduce vegetatively. The orchid is reliant on seed-set and germination for recruitment of new plants. There are no data on the effects of fire on this species, although it does flower freely without fire stimulation (Branwhite 2009 pers. comm. cited in TSSC 2012w).

Identified threats to the Bago Leek-orchid include changes to local hydrology, grazing by domestic stock, soil disturbance by the Feral Pig (Sus scrofa) and the Feral Horse (Equus caballus), four-wheel-drive, trail bike and horse trail riding activities, plant removal and trampling, weed invasion by Yorkshire Fog (Holcus lanatus) and inappropriate land management (NSW SC 2004; Branwhite 2009 pers. comm. cited in TSSC 2012w). Potential threats include plant collection and further weed invasion (Branwhite 2009 pers. comm. cited in TSSC 2012w).

Surveys of the Bago Leek-orchid have shown a decline in the overall number of mature individuals, mainly due to drought and changes in hydrology caused by dam construction and grazing (Branwhite 2009 pers. comm. cited in TSSC 2012w).

Management documents relevant to the Bago Leek-orchid can be found at the start of the profile.

No threats data available.

Beretta, M (2012). Monitoring the Bago Leek Orchid (Prasophyllum bagoensis). Australasian Plant Conservation. 20(4).

Council of Heads of Australasian Herbaria (CHAH) (2011). Australian Plant Census. [Online]. Australian National Herbarium, Australian National Botanic Gardens and Australian Biological Resources Study . Available from: http://www.anbg.gov.au/cgi-bin/apclist.

Jones, D.L. (2000). Ten New Species of Prasophyllum R.Br. (Orchidaceae) from South-eastern Australia. The Orchadian. 13(4):149-173.

Jones, D.L. (2006). A complete guide to Native Orchids of Australia, including the island Territories. Sydney, NSW: New Holland Publishers (Australia) Pty Ltd.

New South Wales Scientific Committee (NSW SC) (2004). Prasophyllum bagoensis (an orchid) - endangered species listing - final determination. [Online]. Available from: http://www.environment.nsw.gov.au/determinations/PrasophyllumBagoensisEndSpListing.htm.

NSW Office of Environment and Heritage (NSW OEH) (2012). Bago Leek Orchid - profile.

Threatened Species Scientific Committee (TSSC) (2012v). Commonwealth Conservation Advice on Prasophyllum bagoense (Bago Leek-orchid). [Online]. Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities. Canberra, ACT: Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities. Available from: http://www.environment.gov.au/biodiversity/threatened/species/pubs/84276-conservation-advice.pdf.

Threatened Species Scientific Committee (TSSC) (2012w). Commonwealth Listing Advice on Prasophyllum bagoense (Bago Leek-orchid). [Online]. Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities. Canberra, ACT: Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities. Available from: http://www.environment.gov.au/biodiversity/threatened/species/pubs/84276-listing-advice.pdf.

EPBC Act email updates can be received via the Communities for Communities newsletter and the EPBC Act newsletter.

This database is designed to provide statutory, biological and ecological information on species and ecological communities, migratory species, marine species, and species and species products subject to international trade and commercial use protected under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (the EPBC Act). It has been compiled from a range of sources including listing advice, recovery plans, published literature and individual experts. While reasonable efforts have been made to ensure the accuracy of the information, no guarantee is given, nor responsibility taken, by the Commonwealth for its accuracy, currency or completeness. The Commonwealth does not accept any responsibility for any loss or damage that may be occasioned directly or indirectly through the use of, or reliance on, the information contained in this database. The information contained in this database does not necessarily represent the views of the Commonwealth. This database is not intended to be a complete source of information on the matters it deals with. Individuals and organisations should consider all the available information, including that available from other sources, in deciding whether there is a need to make a referral or apply for a permit or exemption under the EPBC Act.

Citation: Department of the Environment (2014). Prasophyllum bagoense in Species Profile and Threats Database, Department of the Environment, Canberra. Available from: http://www.environment.gov.au/sprat. Accessed Sat, 26 Jul 2014 04:33:50 +1000.