Three Springs Daviesia Daviesia bursarioides Interim Recovery Plan 2004-2009

Western Australian Threatened Species and Communities Unit (WATSCU)
© The Western Australian, Department of Conservation and Land Management, 2004

4. Term of Plan

This Interim Recovery Plan will operate from June 2004 to May 2009 but will remain in force until withdrawn or replaced. If the taxon is still ranked Critically Endangered after five years, the need to review this IRP or to replace it with a full Recovery Plan will be determined.

5. References

Brown, A., Thomson-Dans, C. and Marchant, N. (Eds). (1998) Western Australias Threatened Flora. Department of Conservation and Land Management, Western Australia.

CALM (2003 onwards) Western Australian Herbarium FloraBase 2 Information on the Western Australian Flora. Department of Conservation and Land Management, Western Australia. Accessed 2003. http://www.calm.wa.gov.au/science/

CALM (1995) Policy Statement No. 29 Translocation of Threatened Flora and Fauna. Department of Conservation and Land Management, Western Australia.

CALM (1994) Policy Statement No. 50 Setting Priorities for the Conservation of Western Australias Threatened Flora and Fauna. Department of Conservation and Land Management, Western Australia.

CALM (1992) Policy Statement No. 44 Wildlife Management Programs. Department of Conservation and Land Management, Western Australia.

Cochrane, A., Monks, L. and Juszkiewicz, S. (2000a) Translocation trials for four threatened Western Australian plant taxa. Danthonia 9(3), 7-9.

Cochrane, A., Monks, L. and Juszkiewicz, S. (2000b) The germination, cultivation and initial translocation success of four rare Western Australian plant taxa. Department of Conservation and Land Management, Western Australia.

Crisp, M.D. (1985) Conservation of the genus Daviesia. Australian National Botanic Gardens, Occasional Paper No. 6.

Crisp, M.D. (1995) Contributions towards a revision of Daviesia (Fabaceae: Mirbelieae) III. A synopsis of Daviesia. Australian Systematic Botany 8(6), 1178-79.

IUCN (2000) IUCN Red List Categories: Version 3.1. IUCN Red List Categories prepared by the IUCN Species Survival Commission, as approved by the 51st Meeting of the IUCN Council. Gland, Switzerland.

Patrick, S. and Brown, A. (2001) Declared Rare and Poorly Known Flora in the Moora District. Department of Conservation and Land Management, Western Australia.

Schwarten T. (1995) The Biology and Ecology of Threatened Daviesia Species in Western Australia. Australian Nature Conservation Agency, Report Project 356, 42 pp.

Shearer, B.L., Crane, C.E. and Cochrane, A. (submitted). Quantification of the susceptibility of the flora of the South-West Botanical Province, Western Australia to Phytophthora cinnamomi. Australian Journal of Botany.

6. Taxonomic Description

Excerpt from: Crisp, M.D. (1995) Contributions towards a revision of Daviesia (Fabaceae: Mirbelieae) III. A synopsis of Daviesia. Australian Systematic Botany 8(6), 1178-79.

Daviesia bursarioides

Straggling shrubs, to 2 m high. Branchlets regularly divaricate at 45°, terete, striate, spinescent, pruinose. Phyllodes spreading or ascending, narrow-obovate, apiculate, tapered to the base, articulate, 3-20 mm long, rather fleshy, glaucescent; mid-rib and veins obscure. Racemes 3-8 flowered, sub-umbelliform, very diffuse owing to the long (25-35 mm) rachis, viscid on rachis, pedicels and bracts; pedicels 3-5 mm long. Calyx c. 4 mm long including the stipe-like receptacle, slightly 5-ribbed when dry, viscid; lobes subequal. Standard with two calli above claw, 9-10 mm broad, yellow towards margins, maroon on veins and towards centre; wing rounded and incurved at apex, deep pink; keel maroon. Stamens strongly dimorphic, inner whorl with filaments compressed and anthers versatile, very broad-ovoid, with cells confluent; outer whorl slightly longer, with filaments flattened and anthers basifixed, broad-ellipsoid, 2-celled. Pod compressed, acuminate, stipe-like at base, 10-14 mm long, coriaceous.

Distribution: Three Springs.

Etymology: The specific epithet refers to the superficial resemblance between the habit of D. bursarioides and certain species of Bursaria (Pittosproaceae).

Notes: Daviesia bursarioides is a very distinctive species which cannot be confused with any other in the genus. The regular, divaricate branching pattern in combination with the spinescent branchlet apices and the small, narrowly obovate phyllodes diagnose a unique plant which looks for all the world like a Bursaria (Pittosporaceae). The elongated partly umbelliform, partly racemiform inflorescences, as well as details of the flowers and fruits, suggest a relationship to D. costata and D. longifolia. It also shows similarity to D. pedunculata in the inflorescence, viscid pedicels and pruinose branchlets; however, the latter has larger, pungent leaves and non-divaricate, non-spinescent branchlets.