Dandaragan Mallee Eucalyptus dolorosa Interim Recovery Plan 2004-2009

Western Australian Threatened Species and Communities Unit (WATSCU)
© The Western Australian, Department of Conservation and Land Management, 2004

4. Term of Plan

This Interim Recovery Plan will operate from June 2004 to May 2009 but will remain in force until withdrawn or replaced. If the taxon is still ranked Critically Endangered after five years, the need to review this IRP or to replace it with a full Recovery Plan will be determined.

5. References

Brooker, M.I.H. and Hopper, S.D. (1993) New series, subseries, species and subspecies of Eucalyptus (Myrtaceae) from Western Australia and from South Australia. Nuytsia 9(1), 1-68.

Brown, A., Thomson-Dans, C. and Marchant, N. (Eds). (1998) Western Australias Threatened Flora. Department of Conservation and Land Management, Western Australia.

CALM (2003 onwards) Western Australian Herbarium FloraBase 2 Information on the Western Australian Flora. Department of Conservation and Land Management, Western Australia. Accessed 2003. http://www.calm.wa.gov.au/science/

CALM (1995) Policy Statement No. 29 Translocation of Threatened Flora and Fauna. Department of Conservation and Land Management, Western Australia.

CALM (1994) Policy Statement No. 50 Setting Priorities for the Conservation of Western Australias Threatened Flora and Fauna. Department of Conservation and Land Management, Western Australia.

CALM (1992) Policy Statement No. 44 Wildlife Management Programs. Department of Conservation and Land Management, Western Australia.

CALM (1990 onwards) Threatened Flora Database (DEFL). Wildlife Branch, Department of Conservation & Land Management, Western Australia. Accessed 2004.

IUCN (2000) IUCN Red List Categories prepared by the IUCN Species Survival Commission, as approved by the 51st Meeting of the IUCN Council. Gland, Switzerland.

Patrick, S. and Brown, A. (2001) Declared Rare and Poorly Known Flora in the Moora District. Department of Conservation and Land Management, Western Australia.

Rossetto, M., Jezierski,Hopperand Dixon,(1999). Conservation genetics and clonality in two critically endangered eucalypts from the highly endemic south-western Australian flora. Biological Conservation 88, 321-331.

6. Taxonomic Description

Excerpt from: Brooker, M.I.H. and Hopper, S.D. (1993) New series, subseries, species and subspecies of Eucalyptus (Myrtaceae) from Western Australia and from South Australia. Nuytsia 9(1), 1-68.

Eucalyptus dolorosa

Mallee to 2.5 m tall with thin, outer grey and inner yellowish, rough bark on older stems. Juvenile leaves petiolate, alternating, broadly falcate, to 11 x 4.5 cm, dull, conspicuously light bluish grey. Adult leaves petiolate, alternating, lanceolate or rarely falcate, up to 10 x 2 cm, concolorous, slightly glossy, green; side veins seen to be linked with the midrib; reticulation moderately dense with finite tertiary and incomplete quaternary veining; oil glands numerous, several per areole, island. Inflorescences axillary and unbranched usually clustered at the leafless ends of branchlets; peduncles more or less terete, up to 1.5 cm long with 7 flowers. Buds on long pedicels up to 1 cm long, rhomboid, up to 0.9 x 0.6 cm, with a single slightly beaked operculum. Stamens very numerous (c. 300 per bud), variously flexed, all fertile; anthers dorsifixed, versatile, oblong, dehiscing by longitudinal slits, with a prominent terminal gland. Style glandular; stigma apparently lobed. Flowers white. Ovules in 2 vertical rows. Fruit on pedicels to 0.7 cm long, cupular to truncate-globose and slightly contracted at the rim, wider than long, to 1 x 1.4 cm; valves 4, to rim level. Seed brown, pyramidal, winged, with terminal hilum.

Distribution: Mt Misery, between Cataby and Dandaragan, Western Australia, where it occurs within a hectare including the flat mesa top and the southern slope in 5 or 6 clumps, each consisting of several apparent individuals.

Flowering period: March.

Etymology: The specific epithet simply alludes to the only known occurrence of this species, viz. Mt Misery (Latin, dolorosus sorrowful).

Notes: E. dolorosa persists on a refugial site similar to species such as E. suberea and E. lateritica in Mt Lesueur National Park. It is probable that E. dolorosa is a relict species barely surviving extinction due to drying climate in the late Pleistocene.