Split-Leaved Grevillea (Grevillea althoferorum) Interim Recovery Plan 2003-2008

Interim Recovery Plan No. 129
Gillian Stack and Val English
Department of Conservation and Land Management, WA, 2003

4. Term of plan

This Interim Recovery Plan will operate from May 2003 to April 2008 but will remain in force until withdrawn or replaced. If the taxon is still ranked Critically Endangered after five years, the need to review this IRP or to replace it with a full Recovery Plan will be determined.

5. Acknowledgements

The following people have provided assistance and advice in the preparation of this Interim Recovery Plan:

Gina Broun    Conservation Officer, the Department's Moora District
Dr Margaret Byrne    Principal Research Scientist, the Department's Science Division ,WA Herbarium
John Carter    Nature Conservation Coordinator, the Department's Perth Hills District
Anne Cochrane    Manager, the Department's Threatened Flora Seed Centre
Colin Crane    Senior Technical Officer, the Department's Science Division, Kensington
Sheila Hamilton-Brown    Botanist, previously W.A. Threatened Species and Communities Unit
David Mitchell    Program Leader Nature Conservation, the Department's Swan Region
Amanda Shade    Horticulturalist, Botanic Garden and Parks Authority
Dr Colin Yates    Senior Research Scientist, the Department's Science Division, WA Herbarium

Thanks also to the staff of the W.A. Herbarium for providing access to Herbarium databases and specimen information, and the Department's Wildlife Branch for assistance.

6. References

Brown, A., Thomson-Dans, C. and Marchant, N. (Eds). (1998). Western Australia's Threatened Flora. Department of Conservation and Land Management, Western Australia.

Burne, H.M., Yates, C.J. and Ladd, P.G. (in press). Comparative population structure and reproductive biology of the critically endangered shrub Grevillea althoferorum and two closely related more common congeners. Submitted to Conservation Biology.

Department of Conservation and Land Management (1992a). Policy Statement No. 44 Wildlife Management Programs. Perth, Western Australia.

Department of Conservation and Land Management (1992b). Dieback disease hygiene manual. Perth, Western Australia.

Department of Conservation and Land Management (1994). Policy Statement No. 50 Setting Priorities for the Conservation of Western Australia's Threatened Flora and Fauna. Perth, Western Australia.

Department of Conservation and Land Management (1995). Policy Statement No. 29 Translocation of Threatened Flora and Fauna. Perth, Western Australia.

Department of Conservation and Land Management (1998). Western Australian Herbarium FloraBase - Information on the Western Australian Flora. Perth, Western Australia. http://www.calm.wa.gov.au/science/

Drechsler, M., Lamont, B.B., Burgman, M.A., Akcakaya, H.R., Witkowski, E.T.F. and Supriyadi (1999) Modelling the persistence of an apparently immortal Banksia species after fire and land clearing. Biological Conservation: 88: 249-259.

Gibson, N., Keighery, B., Keighery, G., Burbidge, A. and Lyons, M. (1994). A floristic survey of the Southern Swan Coastal Plain. Unpublished report for the Australian Heritage Commission prepared by Department of Conservation and Land Management and the Conservation Council of Western Australia (Inc.).

Hamilton-Brown, S. and English, V. (1999) Interim Recovery Plan number 42, 1999-2002 Grevillea althoferorum. Department of Conservation and Land Management, Perth.

Olde, P.M. and Marriott, N.R. (1993). New species and taxonomic changes in Grevillea (Proteaceae: Grevilloideae) from south-west Western Australia. Nuytsia: 9 (2): 237-304.

Olde, P. and Marriott, N. (1995). The Grevillea book; species A-L Volume 2. Kangaroo Press, Kenthurst, N.S.W.

World Conservation Union (2000). IUCN red list categories prepared by the IUCN Species Survival Commission, as approved by the 51st meeting of the IUCN Council. Gland, Switzerland.

7. Taxonomic description

Olde, P.M. and Marriott, N.R. (1993). New species and taxonomic changes in Grevillea (Proteaceae: Grevilloideae) from south-west Western Australia. Nuytsia: 9 (2): 237-304.

Compact, rounded shrubs 0.3-0.5 m high, 0.5-1 m wide; flexuose, ascending to spreading branches, dense to the ground. Branchlets round, scabrous to sparsely hirsute. Leaves 3-7.5 cm long, 1-5 cm wide, including petioles 1-5 cm long, bluish green, tangled, persistent after death, secund, ascending to erect, persistent, usually pinnatipartite; rarely (confined to foliage at the base of the plant) simple, pinnatifid, obovate-cuneate with 3-4 apical teeth, sometimes with secondary lobing of apical lobe, sometimes leaves subtending the peduncles simple and entire, 1.8-2.4 cm long, 0.1-0.2 cm wide, linear, often fasciculate near the base of the conflorescence, sessile, usually curved, pungent; primary leaf lobes 3-7 per leaf, 2-2.5 cm long, 1-3 cm wide, obovate-cuneate, distant, cuspidate, apically 3(4)-fid, the ultimate secondary lobe broadly triangular, pungent; the apical lobe often linear, occasionally the secondary lobes bifid; upper and lower surfaces similar, scabrous to sparsely hirsute; concolorous; venation prominent, more conspicuous on undersurface; mixed craspedodromous with prominent reticulum, margin flat, coincident with a conspicuous, rounded, scabrous vein; texture firmly chartaceous to coriaceous. Conflorescence terminal, usually simple, rarely 1-3 branched, erect, sessile, scarcely or not exceeding the foliage; unit conflorescence 2-5 cm long, 1.5 cm wide, cylindrical, loose, development acropetal; floral rachis 1.5 mm wide at the base, arising from a leaf-opposed rosette of bracts, villous; floral bracts 6-7 mm long, 1.5 mm wide, narrowly triangular with apex acuminate, villous outside with mixed biramous and glandular trichomes, glabrous inside, caducous. Flowers pedicels 2-3 mm long, villous, patent; torus ±1 mm across, straight; nectary not evident; perianth 5-6 mm long, 1.5-1.8 mm wide, actinomorphic, reddish when young, ageing dull creamy-yellow, oblong below the limb, villous outside with a mixed indumentum of biramous and glandular trichomes; tepals cohering to anthesis, becoming free to base and strongly rolled down after anthesis, exposing an inner surface either densely papillose or bearing short papilloid trichomes; limb 1.5-2 mm long, 1.5-2 mm wide, erect, densely villous with spreading to erect straight trichomes; style creamy yellow, kinked or folded above ovary, glandular-pubescent on lower filiform portion, papillose on the upper third where continuously dilated to c. 4mm wide below the broadly expanded style-end; pollen presenter c. 0.8 mm long, 0.6-0.7 mm wide at its base, straight, conico-cylindrical with cupuliform apex. Fruits not seen.

Addendum

Spilt-leaved Grevillea (Grevillea althoferorum) Interim Recovery Plan 2003-2008

In adopting this plan under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (EPBC Act), the Minister for the Environment and Heritage has approved the following modifications.

Critical Habitat
The plan identifies a broad area as critical habitat, including buffer zones of a set distance around known populations. The Threatened Species Scientific Committee does not necessarily believe that such an area qualifies as habitat critical to the survival of the species, as defined in the EPBC Act.

Recovery Criteria
For the purposes of reviewing this recovery plan under the EPBC Act, the Recovery Criteria are amended to read as follows:

Criteria for success: The number of individuals within populations and/or the number of populations have increased by 10% or more over the period of the plan's adoption under the EPBC Act.
Criteria for failure: The number of individuals within populations and/or the number of populations have decreased by 10% or more over the period of the plan's adoption under the EPBC Act.