McCutcheon's Grevillia (Grevillia maccutcheonii) Interim Recovery Plan 2003-2008

Interim Recovery Plan No. 144
Gillian Stack, Andrew Brown and Val English
Department of Conservation and Land Management, WA, 2003

4. Term of plan

This Interim Recovery Plan will operate from June 2003 to May 2008 but will remain in force until withdrawn or replaced. If the taxon is still ranked Critically Endangered after five years, the need to review this IRP or to replace it with a full Recovery Plan will be determined.

5. Acknowledgements

The following people have provided assistance and advice in the preparation of this Interim Recovery Plan:

Anne Cochrane
Manager, DCLM's Threatened Flora Seed Centre
Colin Crane
Senior Technical Officer, DCLM's Science Division
Leonie Monks
Research Scientist, DCLM's Science Division
Amanda Shade
Horticulturalist, Botanic Garden and Parks Authority
Bryan Shearer
Principal Research Scientist, DCLM's Science Division
Meredith Spencer
Conservation Officer, DCLM's Blackwood District

We would like to thank the staff of DCLM's WA Herbarium for providing access to Herbarium databases and specimen information, and DCLM's Wildlife Branch for their extensive assistance.

6. References

Brown, A., Thomson-Dans, C. and Marchant, N. (Eds). (1998) Western Australia's Threatened Flora. Department of Conservation and Land Management, Western Australia.

English, V. (1999). Shrubland Association on Southern Swan Coastal Plain Ironstone (Busselton Area) (Southern Ironstone Association), Draft Interim Recovery Plan. Department of Conservation and Land Management, Western Australia.

Gibson, N., Keighery, B., Keighery, G., Burbidge, A and Lyons, M. (1994). A floristic survey of the Southern Swan Coastal Plain. Unpublished report for the Australian Heritage Commission prepared by the Department of Conservation & Land Management & the Conservation Council of Western Australia (Inc.).

Keighery, G.J. and Cranfield, R.J. (1996) Grevillea maccutcheonii (Proteaceae), a New Rare Grevillea from Western Australia. Nuytsia 11(1), 33-36.

Murray, D. (ed). (1997). Control of Phytophthora and Diplodina Canker in Western Australia. Department of Conservation and Land Management, Western Australia; Environment Australia.

DCLM (1992a) Dieback disease hygiene manual. Department of Conservation and Land Management, Western Australia.

DCLM (1992b) Policy Statement No. 44 Wildlife Management Programs. Department of Conservation and Land Management, Western Australia.

DCLM (1994) Policy Statement No. 50 Setting Priorities for the Conservation of Western Australia's Threatened Flora and Fauna. Department of Conservation and Land Management, Western Australia.

DCLM (1995) Policy Statement No. 29 Translocation of Threatened Flora and Fauna. Department of Conservation and Land Management, Western Australia.

DCLM (1998) Western Australian Herbarium FloraBase - Information on the Western Australian Flora. Department of Conservation and Land Management, Western Australia. http://www.calm.wa.gov.au/science/

World Conservation Union (2000) IUCN red list categories prepared by the IUCN Species Survival Commission, as approved by the 51st meeting of the IUCN Council. Gland, Switzerland.

7. Taxonomic description

Keighery, G.J. and Cranfield, R.J. (1996) Grevillea maccutcheonii (Protease), a New Rare Grevillea from Western Australia. Nuytsia 11(1), 33-36.

Grevillea maccutcheonii is an erect spreading densely branched, domed shrub to 2m tall x 2m wide, not lignotuberous or suckering. Branchlets terete, glabrous, reddish green, young growth red. Immature leaves entire or with a single apical lobe. Mature leaves sessile, pandurate, 12-33 mm long (mean 19), 6-22 mm wide (mean 11), with a central sinus, base stem-clasping, amplexicaule, rigid, glabrous, with a distinct white margin, margin flat, 3-lobed, one lobe apical, the others shortly below on either side, each lobe terminating in a black pungent point c. 1 mm long, shiny green above, dull green below, mid vein prominent when dry on both surfaces. Inflorescence terminal, racemose 26-42 flowered, lower flowers more widely spaced than upper flowers; peduncle glabrous, 10-12 mm long; rachis glabrous, markedly decurved, usually simple, rarely two-branched; unit inflorescence 2-4 cm long, loosely hemispherical and secund to subsecund, acropetal. Inflorescence bract leaf-like, narrowly cordate. Floral bracts ovate c. 1 mm long, 1 mm wide, margin hairy, caducous when buds are small. Pedicels 2-3 long, glabrous, green, torus oblique. Flowers reddish green, acroscopic. Perianth 6-8 mm long, narrowly ovate-oblong below the curve, c. 3 mm wide, green, glabrous outside, inside margins of tepals with a line of hairs and bearded in the throat above the ovary. Nectary prominent, yellow, broadly lunate. Pistil 20-24 mm long, glabrous; stipe 2-3 mm long; ovary obliquely ovoid, 1-2 mm long, green; style red; pollen presenter at 90 degrees, almost round, green; stigma almost central. Fruits brown, narrowly and obliquely ovoid, 13-16 mm long, 5-6 mm wide, surface smooth, pericarp uniform and c. 0.5 mm thick. Seeds narrowly oblong, 7-8 mm long, 2-3 mm wide, outer face markedly convex, margin revolute, inner face channelled, eliasome lacking.

Addendum

McCutcheon's Grevillea (Grevillea maccutcheonii) Interim Recovery Plan 2003-2008

In adopting this plan under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (EPBC Act), the Minister for the Environment and Heritage has approved the following modifications.

Critical Habitat

The plan identifies a broad area as critical habitat, including buffer zones of a set distance around known populations. The Threatened Species Scientific Committee does not necessarily believe that such an area qualifies as habitat critical to the survival of the species, as defined in the EPBC Act.

Recovery Criteria

For the purposes of reviewing this recovery plan under the EPBC Act, the Recovery Criteria are amended to read as follows:

Criteria for success: The number of individuals within populations and/or the number of populations have increased by 10% or more over the period of the plan's adoption under the EPBC Act.
Criteria for failure: The number of individuals within populations and/or the number of populations have decreased by 10% or more over the period of the plan's adoption under the EPBC Act.