Round-leafed Honeysuckle (Lambertia orbifolia subsp. Orbifolia ms) 2002-2007

Interim Recovery Plan No. 115
Robyn Phillimore and Andrew Brown
Department of Conservation and Land Management, WA, 2003

Summary

Scientific Name: Lambertia orbifolia subsp. orbifolia ms Common Name: Round-leafed Honeysuckle
Family: Proteaceae Flowering Period: November to May
Dept Region: South Coast Dept District: Albany
Shire: Plantagenet Recovery Team: Albany District Threatened Flora Recovery Team (ADTFRT)

Illustrations and/or further information: Brown, A., Thomson-Dans, C. and Marchant, N. (Eds). (1998) Western Australia's Threatened Flora. Department of Conservation and Land Management, Western Australia;

Current status: Following the splitting of Lambertia orbifolia into two subspecies in September 1999, the subsp. orbifolia ms was ranked as Critically Endangered (CR). It currently meets World Conservation Union (IUCN, 2000) Red List Category 'CR' under criteria B2ab(ii,iii,v) due to it being known from just three populations and a continuing decline in number of individuals, area and quality of habitat. The main threats are disease, grazing, road and track maintenance, weed invasion and inappropriate fire regimes.

Habitat requirements: Lambertia orbifolia subsp. orbifolia ms is endemic to Western Australia where it is found only in the Narrikup area, growing in Jarrah (Eucalyptus marginata), Marri (Corymbia calophylla) and Banksia woodland on grey/brown/white gravelly, sandy, loam over ironstone.

Critical habitat: The critical habitat for Lambertia orbifolia subsp. orbifolia ms comprises the area of occupancy of the known populations; similar habitat within 200 metres of known populations; corridors of remnant vegetation that link populations and additional nearby occurrences of similar habitat that do not currently contain the subspecies but may be used for translocations.

Existing Recovery Actions: The following recovery actions have been or are currently being implemented -

  1. Land managers and adjacent landowners have been made aware of the location of the Lambertia orbifolia subsp. orbifolia ms and its threatened status.
  2. Declared Rare Flora (DRF) markers have been installed at Population 1 and subpopulations 2a, 2b and 3a.
  3. Dashboard stickers and posters that illustrate DRF markers and describe their purpose have been produced and distributed.
  4. Approximately 1356 seeds were collected from Population 1 between 1985 and 1996. During the same period a further 2237 seeds were collected from Population 2. These seeds are stored in the Department's Threatened Flora Seed Centre (TFSC) at -18°C.
  5. Forty-five out of 51 (88%) of germinants received by the Botanic Garden and Parks Authority (BGPA) from the TFSC have survived with another planting having 100% survival.
  6. An experimental translocation was initiated in 1998 and continued in 1999 and 2000. Three treatments were tested, light mulch, thick mulch and gro-cones. Monitoring has been undertaken every two months.
  7. L. Sage from Curtin University undertook an Honours project on Lambertia orbifolia.
  8. Research on the genetic structure and mating systems of Lambertia orbifolia was undertaken by Science Division between 1996 and 1997.
  9. Hand spraying of phosphite, for the control of Phytophthora cinnamomi, was undertaken at Population 1 and 2 in autumn/winter of 1994 and 1995.
  10. An article and drawing of Lambertia orbifolia subsp. orbifolia ms was placed in the Albany Advertiser and Narrikup News in April 2000.
  11. Staff from the Department's Albany District attended the Department of Agriculture's, Wilson Inlet Catchment field day and gave an oral presentation on Lambertia orbifolia subsp. orbifolia ms and provided the Community Landcare Coordinator with posters for the area.
  12. Subpopulations 2a and 2b have been fenced. A dog-leg was put in by the private property owner so that the fence did not go through the centre of the population.
  13. Staff from the Department's Albany District Office regularly monitor all populations in relation to the impact of Phytophthora cinnamomi and effectiveness of phosphite application.
  14. The Albany District Threatened Flora Recovery Team (ADTFRT) is overseeing the implementation of this IRP and will include it in its annual report to the Department's Corporate Executive and funding bodies.

IRP Objective: The objective of this Interim Recovery Plan is to abate identified threats and maintain or enhance in situ populations to ensure the long-term preservation of the subspecies in the wild.

Recovery criteria
Criteria for success: The number of individuals within populations and/or the number of populations have increased.
Criteria for failure: The number of individuals within populations and/or the number of populations have decreased.

Recovery actions
1. Coordinate recovery actions. 9. Conduct further surveys.
2. Apply phosphite. 10. Collect seed.
3. Install fencing. 11. Liaise with land managers.
4. Propagate plants for translocation. 12. Achieve long-term protection of habitat.
5. Undertake further translocations 13. Obtain biological and ecological information.
6. Implement weed control. 14. Promote awareness.
7. Develop and implement a fire management strategy. 15. Write a full Recovery Plan.
8. Monitor populations