Spiral flag Patersonia spirafolia interim recovery plan 2004-2009

Western Australian Threatened Species and Communities Unit (WATSCU) © The Western Australian, Department of Conservation and Land Management, 2004

4. Term of Plan

This Interim Recovery Plan will operate from June 2004 to May 2009 but will remain in force until withdrawn or replaced. If the taxon is still ranked Endangered after five years, the need to review this IRP or to replace it with a full Recovery Plan will be determined.

5. References

Atkins, K. (2003) Declared Rare and Priority Flora List for Western Australia. Department of Conservation and Land Management, Western Australia.

Brown, A., Thomson-Dans, C. and Marchant, N. (Eds). (1998) Western Australias Threatened Flora. Department of Conservation and Land Management, Western Australia.

CALM (2003 onwards) Western Australian Herbarium FloraBase 2 Information on the Western Australian Flora. Department of Conservation and Land Management, Western Australia. Accessed 2003. http://www.calm.wa.gov.au/science/

CALM (1995) Policy Statement No. 29 Translocation of Threatened Flora and Fauna. Department of Conservation and Land Management, Western Australia.

CALM (1994) Policy Statement No. 50 Setting Priorities for the Conservation of Western Australias Threatened Flora and Fauna. Department of Conservation and Land Management, Western Australia.

CALM (1992) Policy Statement No. 44 Wildlife Management Programs. Department of Conservation and Land Management, Western Australia.

CALM (1990 onwards) Threatened Flora Database (DEFL). Wildlife Branch, Department of Conservation & Land Management, Western Australia. Accessed 2003.

IUCN - World Conservation Union (2000) IUCN Red List Categories prepared by the IUCN Species Survival Commission, as approved by the 51st Meeting of the IUCN Council. Gland, Switzerland.

Keighery, G.J. (1990) Patersonia spirafolia (Iridaceae), a new species from south-western Australia. Nuytsia 7(2), 137-139.

Patrick, S. and Brown, A. (2001) Declared Rare and Poorly Known Flora in the Moora District. Department of Conservation and Land Management, Western Australia.

Smith, L. and Broun, G. (2003) Declared Rare Flora in the Shire of Dandaragan. Unpublished report produced by Northern Agricultural Catchment Council, CALM, Threatened Species Network, World Wide Fund for Nature (Australia), Natural Heritage Trust, Shire of Dandaragan, Landskills, and the WA Government. Dandaragan, Western Australia.

6. Taxonomic Description

Excerpt from: Keighery, G.J. (1990) Patersonia spirafolia (Iridaceae), a new species from south-western Australia. Nuytsia 7(2), 137-139.

Patersonia spirafolia

Rootstock a spreading woody rhizome, forming a tussock to 40 cm across, producing 2-15 slender, erect, leafy, woody stems to 30 cm, covered by leaf bases. Leaves linear, spirally twisted, 50-200 x 3-5 mm, biconvex with minute grooves; margins brown, with silky, appressed hairs pointing to the middle; base brown, scarious, glabrous. Scape 150-250 x 1-2 mm, glabrous, reddish-green. Spathe lanceolate (longest 24-26 mm, shortest 21-22 mm), brown, glabrous; margins scarious, almost transparent. Involucre slightly gaping; inner bracts exposed, 7-9 mm wide. Flowers sessile, fugacious, each with a scarious bracteole, diurnal; floral tube filiform, 11-16 mm long, sparsely hairy at ovary summit, included in the bracts. Sepals free, rhomboid, spreading, 16-19 mm x 8-14 mm, blue-violet. Petals erect, blue-violet, c. 1 mm long; apex acute. Stamens inserted at apex of floral tube; filaments 2-4 mm long, white, connate. Anthers connective triangular, basifixed, yellow; 7-8 mm long, dehiscing by slits. Style filiform, narrowed towards base, c. 10 mm long; stigmatic lobes 3, equal, flattened, free, papillose on upper surface. Ovary pubescent. Capsule ovoid-oblong, 1.5-3 cm long. Seed not seen.

Notes: Occurs on low hills in and around Badgingarra National Park, along the Gardner Range.

Habitat: Grows in low, species-rich heath in sand over laterite.

Flowering period: October to November.

Discussion: Patersonia spirafolia belongs with those Western Australian species of Patersonia which form tussocks, comprising P. inaequalis and P. drummondii. It differs from P. inaequalis in having purple flowers and brown spathes; it differs from P. drummondii in the short appressed hairs on the leaf margins and the shorter spathes, which are brown when flowering occurs.

Etymology: The specific epithet refers to the spirally twisted leaves.