Quartz-loving synaphea (Synaphea quartzitica) interim recovery plan 2003-2008

Interim recovery plan no. 128
Gillian Stack and Val English
Department of Conservation and Land Management, Western Australia, January 2003

4. Term of plan

This Interim Recovery Plan will operate from January 2002 to December 2007 but will remain in force until withdrawn or replaced. If the taxon is still ranked Critically Endangered after five years, the need to review this IRP or to replace it with a full Recovery Plan will be determined.

5. Acknowledgements

The following people have provided assistance and advice in the preparation of this Interim Recovery Plan:

Ryonen Butcher    Ph.D. Student - taxonomy of Synaphea, University of Western Australia
Martin Caldwell    Geologist
Anne Cochrane    Manager, the Department's Threatened Flora Seed Centre
Melanie Harding    previously Honours student - conservation biology of S. quartzitica, Curtin University
Diana Papenfus    Botanist, previously W.A. Herbarium
Robert Powell    Acting Land Acquisitions Officer, the Department's Land Administration Unit

Thanks also to the staff of the W.A. Herbarium for providing access to Herbarium databases and specimen information, and the Department's Wildlife Branch for assistance.

6. References

Brown, A., Thomson-Dans, C. and Marchant, N. (Eds). (1998) Western Australia's Threatened Flora. Department of Conservation and Land Management, Western Australia.

Department of Conservation and Land Management (1992) Policy Statement No. 44 Wildlife Management Programs. Department of Conservation and Land Management, Western Australia.

Department of Conservation and Land Management (1994) Policy Statement No. 50 Setting Priorities for the Conservation of Western Australia's Threatened Flora and Fauna. Department of Conservation and Land Management, Western Australia.

Department of Conservation and Land Management (1995) Policy Statement No. 29 Translocation of Threatened Flora and Fauna. Department of Conservation and Land Management, Western Australia.

Department of Conservation and Land Management (1998) Western Australian Herbarium FloraBase - Information on the Western Australian Flora. Department of Conservation and Land Management, Western Australia. http://www.calm.wa.gov.au/science/

George, A.S. (1995). Synaphea. Flora of Australia 16: 271-315. Australian Government Publishing Service, Canberra.

Hamilton-Brown, S. (2000) Interim Recovery Plan - Heath dominated by one or more of Regelia megacephala, Kunzea praestans and Allocasuarina campestris on ridges and slopes of the chert hills of the Coomberdale Floristic Region. Department of Conservation and Land Management, Western Australia.

Harding, M.G. and Lamont, B.B. (2001) Conservation biology of the rare Synaphea quartzitica and common Synaphea spinulosa. Department of Environmental Biology, Curtin University of Technology, Western Australia.

Stack, G. and English, V. (1999) Interim Recovery Plan number 50, 1999-2002 Synaphea quartzitica. Department of Conservation and Land Management, Perth

World Conservation Union (2000) IUCN red list categories prepared by the IUCN Species Survival Commission, as approved by the 51st meeting of the IUCN Council. Gland, Switzerland.

7. Taxonomic Description

George, A. S. (1995). Synaphea. Flora of Australia 16: 271-315. Australian Government Publishing Service, Canberra.

Synaphea quartzitica
Stems several, to 7 cm long, branched, silky but covered by leaf bases. Leaves pinnatipartite with 2 or 3 pairs of lobes, gently undulate; petiole 6-15 cm long, pilose, glabrescent; lamina 6.5-8 cm long, 8-9 cm wide, pilose to pubescent, glabrescent; primary lobes 3-6 mm wide, tripartite, the upper ones simple; ultimate lobes triangular, abruptly pungent; reticulation very fine, shallow. Inflorescence not or shortly exceeding foliage; spikes 6-18 cm long; flowers rather openly spaced; peduncle 2-10 cm long, branched, tomentose to puberulous, prominently striate; rachis puberulous; bracts ascending, 1-2 mm long, broad, acute, puberulous to hirsute in lower half. Perianth spreading, opening moderately widely, glabrous; adaxial tepal 4.5-5 mm long, 1.5-2 mm wide, strongly curved; abaxial tepal 2.5-3.5 mm long. Stigma narrowly oblong, slightly broadened at base, emarginate, 0.8-1 mm long, 0.3-0.4 mm wide, straight to gently sigmoid, thick; ovary pubescent. Fruit narrowly obovoid, 4 mm long, pubescent.

Flowers July-Aug.

Distinguished by the leaf shape, long spikes, prominently curved adaxial tepal with much shorter abaxial tepal and very narrow stigma. The tip of the abaxial tepal is slightly recurved.

Addendum

Quartz-loving Synaphea (Synaphea quartzitica) Interim Recovery Plan 2003-2008

In adopting this plan under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (EPBC Act), the Minister for the Environment and Heritage has approved the following modifications.

Critical Habitat
The plan identifies a broad area as critical habitat, including buffer zones of a set distance around known populations. The Threatened Species Scientific Committee does not necessarily believe that such an area qualifies as habitat critical to the survival of the species, as defined in the EPBC Act.

Recovery Criteria
For the purposes of reviewing this recovery plan under the EPBC Act, the Recovery Criteria are amended to read as follows:

Criteria for success: The number of individuals within populations and/or the number of populations have increased by 10% or more over the period of the plan's adoption under the EPBC Act.
Criteria for failure: The number of individuals within populations and/or the number of populations have decreased by 10% or more over the period of the plan's adoption under the EPBC Act.