National recovery plan for Zieria lasiocaulis

NSW National Parks and Wildlife Service, 2002
ISBN 0 731 36892 4

Executive Summary

The conservation of threatened species, populations and ecological communities is crucial for the maintenance of this State's unique biodiversity. In NSW, the Threatened Species Conservation Act 1995 (TSC Act) provides the framework to conserve and recover threatened species, populations and ecological communities through the preparation and implementation of recovery plans.

The object of a recovery plan is to document the research and management actions required to promote the recovery of a threatened species, population or ecological community and to ensure its ongoing viability in nature.

Introduction

Zieria lasiocaulis J. A. Armstrong ms is a tall shrub known from a limited area in Willi Willi National Park on the mid-north coast of New South Wales (NSW). This recovery plan describes the current knowledge of the distribution and ecology of Z. lasiocaulis, documents the research and management actions undertaken to date, and identifies the actions required to ensure the ongoing viability of the species in the wild.

Current conservation status

Z. lasiocaulis is endemic to NSW, and is restricted to a small area of about 20 square kilometres. The total population is estimated to be between 20,000 and 25,000 individuals. All populations occur within Willi Willi National Park.

Threatening processes include inappropriate disturbance regimes, road and track construction and maintenance and potential development of recreational facilities.

Z. lasiocaulis is listed on Schedule 1 of the NSW TSC Act as Endangered. It is listed as Endangered under the Commonwealth Environment Protection and Biodiversity Act 1999 (EPBC Act).

Legislative context

The Threatened Species Conservation Act 1995 (TSC Act) is NSW's most comprehensive attempt at establishing a legislative framework to protect and encourage the recovery of threatened species, populations and communities. Under the TSC Act, the Director-General of National Parks and Wildlife has responsibilities which include the preparation of recovery plans for threatened species, populations and ecological communities. Similarly, the EPBC Act requires the Commonwealth Minister for the Environment ensure the preparation of a recovery plan for nationally listed species and communities or adopt plans prepared by others including those developed by state agencies. This recovery plan has been prepared to satisfy both the requirements of the TSC Act and the EPBC Act.

Preparation of plan

This recovery plan has been prepared by consultant botanist Phil Gilmour, and updated by Dianne Brown of the Threatened Species Unit, Northern Directorate of NSW National Parks and Wildlife Service (NPWS).

This plan will be reviewed and updated five years from the date of publication.

Recovery objectives

The overall objective of this recovery plan is to protect known populations of Z. lasiocaulis from decline induced by non-natural impacts, and to ensure that wild populations of Z. lasiocaulis remain viable in the long-term.

Specific objectives of this recovery plan are to:

  • protect and maintain new and existing wild populations of Z. lasiocaulis and their habitat from threatening processes;
  • improve the knowledge of the distribution, ecology, biology, population demographics and genetics of Z. lasiocaulis to enable appropriate management;
  • protect any new populations and their habitat by suitable measures;
  • ensure that land managers are familiar with Z. lasiocaulis both in the field and as a dried specimen;
  • monitor known populations of Z. lasiocaulis;
  • assess the need for ex situ conservation;
  • increase community awareness of Z. lasiocaulis in particular, and threatened plant species in general; and
  • assess whether the declaration of critical habitat for Z. lasiocaulis under the TSC Act would deliver demonstrable conservation benefits.

Recovery criteria

Recovery criteria are that:

  • new and existing wild populations of Z. lasiocaulis are protected and maintained by suitable measures;
  • knowledge of the distribution, ecology, biology, population demographics and genetics relevant to appropriate management of Z. lasiocaulis is improved;
  • land managers are able to recognise Z. lasiocaulis;
  • populations are monitored taking note of recruitment, death, flowering and seed production;
  • the need for ex situ conservation is investigated and undertaken if appropriate;
  • educational material on Z. lasiocaulis is available to the community; and
  • assessment of the need for critical habitat for Z. lasiocaulis is undertaken.

Recovery actions

Recovery actions will be directed towards:

  • implementing management strategies which ensure the survival of known wild populations of Z. lasiocaulis;
  • research into the ecology, biology, population demographics and genetics of Z. lasiocaulis;
  • survey in potential habitat for additional populations of Z. lasiocaulis;
  • familiarising land managers with Z. lasiocaulis;
  • monitoring existing populations of Z. lasiocaulis;
  • investigating the need for establishing ex situ collections of Z. lasiocaulis;
  • community education; and
  • assessment of the need for the declaration of critical habitat for Z. lasiocaulis.

Biodiversity benefits

The occurrence of Z. lasiocaulis contributes to the high biodiversity of the flora of the north coast of NSW. The presence of Z. lasiocaulis in a number of vegetation communities makes these communities unique. The conservation of Z. lasiocaulis in the wild will also benefit other plant and animal species and communities of conservation significance.

By increasing the public awareness of threatened plants such as Z. lasiocaulis, the conservation of other threatened species, and biodiversity in general, is encouraged.

Signed
Brian Gilligan
Director-General

Signed
Bob Debus MP
Minister for the Environment