Indicator: CO-46 Comparative water quality of coastal lakes and lagoons (water quality gradient from north to south)

Data

There does not appear to have been any data collection at this time, comparing water quality of coastal lakes and lagoons along either the western or the eastern Australian coastline. In the future it may be possible to derive some information from remote sensing data.

On the east coast, the Great Barrier Reef represents a substantial component of “coastal lagoons”. The Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority provides discussion of the principal water quality issues on the Great Barrier Reef.

Twenty-six major river catchments comprising approximately 25% of the land area of Queensland drain directly into the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park. Run-off resulting from land based agriculture, urban development and aquaculture is the largest impact affecting the water quality of the Great Barrier Reef.

Principal water quality influences on Great Barrier Reef ecosystems are: nutrients; sediments and turbidity; salinity; heavy metals; and global climate change.

Source: Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority website:

What the data mean

No comparative or trend data for the indicator are available.

Data Limitations

No comparative or trend data available.

Issues for which this is an indicator and why

Coasts and Oceans — Condition of the ocean and coastal waters - Water quality 

Water quality in coastal lakes is an indicator of the condition of the aquatic habitat more broadly.

Other indicators for this issue:

Coasts and Oceans — Direct pressure of human activities on coasts and oceans - Direct pressure of coastal activities (other than shipping and fishing) 

Comparative water quality of coastal lakes and lagoons, especially along the gradient from north to south, is indicative of the cumulative pressure of human settlements on these systems.

Other indicators for this issue:

Coasts and Oceans — Contributions and pressures between the coasts and oceans and inland water - Effect of changes in inland waters on the coasts and oceans 

Coastal lakes and lagoons are at the interface of coastal and inland waters and their condition could be indicative of changes either from the oceans or from inland waters

Other indicators for this issue:

Coasts and Oceans — Contributions and pressures between the coasts and oceans and inland water - Effect of changes in coasts and oceans on inland waters 

Coastal lakes and lagoons are at the interface of coastal and inland waters and their condition could be indicative of changes either from the oceans or from inland waters.

Other indicators for this issue:

Biodiversity — Pressures on biodiversity - Pressures on marine biodiversity: pressures of coastal activities 

Loss of water quality in coastal lakes and lagoons has the potential to place pressure on coastal and estuarine biodiversity. Comparative water quality of coastal lakes and lagoons, especially along the gradient from north to south, is indicative of the cumulative pressure of human settlements on these systems.

Other indicators for this issue:

Inland Waters — Habitat scale influences - Wetlands 

Comparative water quality of coastal lakes and lagoons, especially along the gradient from north to south, is indicative of the cumulative pressure of human activities on these systems including wetlands.

Other indicators for this issue:

Inland Waters — Habitat scale influences — Water Quality (for surface and groundwater) - Nutrients 

Comparative water quality of coastal lakes and lagoons, especially along the gradient from north to south will provide information on nutrient loads entering coastal waters.

Other indicators for this issue: