Indicator: A-32 Implementation of national fuel quality standards

Data

Estimated national reduction in emissions of major pollutants under National Fuel Quality Standards, 2000-2010-2020

Estimated national reduction in emissions of major pollutants under National Fuel Quality Standards, 2000-2010-2020

Source: Department of the Environment and Heritage 2000, A Review of Fuel Quality Requirements for Australian Transport Volume 2, Department of the Environment and Heritage, viewed 20 Dec 2005, http://www.deh.gov.au/atmosphere/fuelquality/standards/index.html.

Sulfur levels in premium unleaded petrol (PULP), unleaded or lead replacement petrol (ULP/LRP) and diesel (2000-2010)

Sulfur levels in premium unleaded petrol (PULP), unleaded or lead replacement petrol (ULP/LRP) and diesel (2000-2010)

Source: Department of the Environment and Heritage 2005, Fuel Quality Standards, viewed 22 Mar 2006, http://www.deh.gov.au/atmosphere/fuelquality/standards/index.html.

What the data mean

The most useful measure of the effectiveness of this response measure will be trend data on the level of emissions or concentrations of relevant pollutants. No data is yet available to measure this, with the most recent data being for 2001 (State of the Air Report 1991-2001). Data, including baseline data, will be provided in the data reporting system when it becomes available.

The graph provided estimates the reduction in emissions of major pollutants between 2000 and 2020 as a result of the national fuel standards. The predicted cut to vehicle emissions of these pollutants is between 30 to 80 percent between 2000 and 2020. This reduction will contribute to improved environmental and health outcomes.

The Department of the Environment and Heritage Annual Report 2003-04 reported that in 2003-04, inspectors took a total of 822 petrol and diesel samples from around 400 sites nationwide. Overall, test results indicated a high level of compliance with the standards with the Department commencing 13 briefs of evidence for eventual referral to the Director of Public Prosecutions.

Data Limitations

No data available at this stage of actual impacts of emissions of pollutants.

Issues for which this is an indicator and why

Atmosphere — Air quality - Air quality - pressures and responses 

The transport sector is one of the major causes of air pollution with motor vehicles being the single largest contributor to urban air pollution and a major influence on the incidence of smog and haze.

In 2002 national legislation came into force on national fuel standards for petrol and diesel. This legislation prohibited the supply of leaded petrol and reduced the level of sulfur in diesel fuel. In addition, fuel quality standards for biodiesel and liquefied petroleum gas came into force in late 2003. Inspectors monitor adherence to the standards through taking samples along the fuel supply chain.

This indicator is a measure of the effectiveness of the government response to pollution from motor vehicles.

Other indicators for this issue: