Indicator: A-36 Rainfall extremes - percentage area experiencing extreme wet and dry conditions

Data

Percentage area wet (above 90 percentile) and dry (below 10th percentile)

Percentage area wet (above 90 percentile) and dry (below 10th percentile)

Source: Bureau of Meteorology 2005, Percentage area of Australian Decile 1 (90th percentile).

What the data mean

The percentage of Australia experiencing wet conditions shows a slight increase over the reporting period 1900 to 2004, while the percentage experiencing dry conditions shows a slight decrease.

Data Limitations

Nil known

Issues for which this is an indicator and why

Atmosphere — Climate variability and change - Weather 

Australia is the driest inhabited continent on earth. Its interior has one of the lowest rainfalls in the world and about three-quarters of the land is arid or semi-arid. Rainfall trends are important from an environmental and an economic perspective. For thousands of years, Australia has experienced strong year-to-year variations in rainfall. Changes in rainfall extremes give an indication of change beyond the normal extreme climate variations.

Other indicators for this issue:

Inland Waters — Catchment scale influences - Influence of climate variability and change 

Australia is the driest inhabited continent on earth. Its interior has one of the lowest rainfalls in the world and about three-quarters of the land is arid or semi-arid. Rainfall trends are important from an environmental and an economic perspective. For thousands of years, Australia has experienced strong year-to-year variations in rainfall. These natural variations and any more extreme variations or changes in the normal scope of variation that may result from anthropogenic climate change are important indicators for the pressure of this change on inland waters.

Other indicators for this issue:

Biodiversity — Pressures on biodiversity - Climate variability 

Australia is the driest inhabited continent on earth. Its interior has one of the lowest rainfalls in the world and about three-quarters of the land is arid or semi-arid. Rainfall trends are important from an environmental and an economic perspective. For thousands of years, Australia has experienced strong year-to-year variations in rainfall. These natural variations and any more extreme variations or changes in the normal scope of variation that may result from anthropogenic climate change are important indicators for the pressure of this change on biodiversity.

Other indicators for this issue:

Further Information