Indicator: AAT-19 Annual catch in tonnes of marine species harvested in Australian Antarctic and sub-Antarctic waters - legal and illegal

Data

Total reported catches (tonnes) of target species in fisheries relevant to Australia
Target species Region* 2001/02 2002/03 2003/04
Catch (tonnes) of target species Catch (% limit) Catch (tonnes) of target species Catch (% limit) Catch (tonnes) of target species Catch (% limit)
Total Limit Total Limit Total Limit
Champsocephalus gunnari
(Mackerill ice fish) 58.5.2 850 885 96 2343 2980 79 51 292 17
Dissostichus spp.
(Toothfish) 58.4.1 0 800 0
58.4.2 0 500 0 117 500 23 20 500 4
58.4.3a 250 0 0 250 0
58.4.3b 300 0 7 300 2
58.5.2 1812 2815 64 2130 2879 74 2269 2873 73
Euphausia superba
Krill 58.4.1 0 440000 0 0 440000 0 0 440000 0
58.5.2 0 450000 0 0 450000 0 0 450000 0

2001/02 - Source: Scientific Committee for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources 2002, Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources, Hobart, Table 3.1

2002/03 - Source: Scientific Committee for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources 2003, Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources, 22nd Meeting of the Scientific Committee, Hobart, Table 3.1

2003/04 - Source: Scientific Committee for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources 2004, Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources, Hobart, Table 3.1

Reported catch (tonnes) of Dissostichus spp. (toothfish) and estimated catch from Illegal, unregulated and unreported fishing (IUU)
Region 2001/02 Season 2002/03 Season 2003/04 Season
Reported catch IUU Catch Catch limit Reported catch IUU Catch Catch limit Reported catch IUU Catch Catch limit
58.4.2 0 295 500 117 113 500 20 197 500
58.4.3a and b 0 550 0 550 7 246 550
58.5.2 2756 3489 2815 2130 1512 2879 2269 637 2873

2001/02 - Source: Scientific Committee for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources 2003, Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources, 22nd Meeting of the Scientific Committee, Hobart, Table 3.2

2002/03 and 2003/04 - Source: Scientific Committee for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources 2004, Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources, Hobart, Table 3.3

Estimates of Illegal, unregulated and unreported (IUU) toothfish catches (tonnes) in the CCAMLR Convention Area from 1996/97 to 2003/04 fishing seasons
Fishing Season 1996/97 1997/98 1998/99 1999/00 2000/01 2001/02 2002/03 2003/04
Estimated IUU catch 32673 15106 5868 7644 8802 11857 10070 2622
Total reported and IUU catches 45130 28518 19531 25214 22598 27198 26877 15929
IUU as % of total catch 72.4 53.0 30.0 30.3 39.0 43.6 37.5 16.5
* Estimated as of 1 October 2004. The estimation will be revised next year in order to take into account any new compliance-related information received for the period to the end of the 2003/04 fishing season, I.e. to 30 November 2004

Source: Scientific Committee for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources 2004, Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources, Hobart, Table 8.1

Antarctic fishing zones

Antarctic fishing zones

Source: Scientific Committee for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources 2003, Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources, 22nd Meeting of the Scientific Committee, Hobart, Figure 5.7, p. 466

What the data mean

The data shows that legal catches of the species are below the specified catch limit, and in some cases, well below the limits. Illegal, unregulated and unreported (IUU) catches of toothfish continue to be of concern. Measures to curb IUU fishing seem to be having an impact with the overall level of toothfish taken as a result of IUU fishing decreasing significantly.

Data Limitations

It is difficult to accurately know the level of IUU fishing.

Issues for which this is an indicator and why

Australian Antarctic Territory — Environment - Human Pressures on the environment 

The ongoing health of Antarctic ecosystems and individual species requires that resources are used in a manner that does not exceed that which is sustainable in the long run. By examining both legal and illegal, unregulated and unreported fishing, and comparing those catches to agreed catch limits, this indicator provides an indication of who sustainable the use of resources are.

Other indicators for this issue:

Coasts and Oceans — Direct pressure of human activities on coasts and oceans - Pressure of fishing 

By examining both legal and illegal, including fishing in Antarctic waters, unregulated and unreported fishing, and comparing those catches to agreed catch limits, this indicator provides an indication of who sustainable the use of resources are.

Other indicators for this issue:

Biodiversity — Utilisation and value of biodiversity - Harvesting and trade in wildlife 

In terms of mass and number of individuals killed, harvesting of wild fish is the principal commercial harvesting of wild animals in Australia and the AAT.

Other indicators for this issue:

Biodiversity — Pressures on biodiversity - Pressures on marine biodiversity: pressures of fishing 

By examining both legal and illegal unregulated and unreported fishing, including fishing in Antarctic waters, and comparing those catches to agreed catch limits, this indicator provides an insight into the extent of the pressure of fishing on marine biodiversity.

Other indicators for this issue:

Further Information