Indicator: A-03 Rainfall extremes - inter-annual variations in annual extreme rainfall

Data

Annual values of rainfall (99th percentile) - central arid

Annual values of rainfall (99th percentile) - central arid

Annual values of rainfall (99th percentile) - central coast

Annual values of rainfall (99th percentile) - central coast

Annual values of rainfall (99th percentile) - north east

Annual values of rainfall (99th percentile) - north east

Annual values of rainfall (99th percentile) - south east

Annual values of rainfall (99th percentile) - south east

Annual values of rainfall (99th percentile) - south west

Annual values of rainfall (99th percentile) - south west

Annual values of rainfall (99th percentile) - tablelands

Annual values of rainfall (99th percentile) - tablelands

Annual values of rainfall (99th percentile) - west

Annual values of rainfall (99th percentile) - west

Source: CSIRO Atmospheric Research 2006

What the data mean

Locations of extreme rainfall events

Locations of extreme rainfall events

The data looks at trends in extreme rainfall for the period 1910 to 2004 and whether extreme rainfall events are becoming stronger, in terms of the amount of rain falling in a twenty four hour period. If the 99th percentile rainfall is increasing then extreme rainfall events are becoming stronger. If the 99th percentile rainfall is decreasing then extreme rainfall events are becoming weaker.

There is a large annual and decadal variability in rainfall. This means that the trends in extreme rainfall over the 1910-2004 period differs from the trends over the 1970 to 2005 period. Over the 1910-2004 the only one statistically significant change is a decrease in annual 99th percentile intensity for the southwest region.

In most regions, the decreases in total and extreme rainfall have occurred since the early 1970s. All regions except the tablelands and the central arid region show a decline in extreme rainfall since the mid-1970s.

Data Limitations

Nil known.

Issues for which this is an indicator and why

Atmosphere - Climate variability and change - Weather 

Australia is the driest inhabited continent on earth. Its interior has one of the lowest rainfalls in the world and about three-quarters of the land is arid or semi-arid. Rainfall trends are important from an environmental and an economic perspective. For thousands of years, Australia has experienced strong year-to-year variations in rainfall.

Other indicators for this issue:

Land - Contributions and pressures between the land and the atmosphere - Climate 

Australia is the driest inhabited continent on earth. Its interior has one of the lowest rainfalls in the world and about three-quarters of the land is arid or semi-arid. Rainfall trends are important from an environmental and an economic perspective. For thousands of years, Australia has experienced strong year-to-year variations in rainfall. These natural variations and any more extreme variations or changes in the normal scope of variation that may result from anthropogenic climate change are important indicators for the pressure of this change on the land.

Other indicators for this issue:

Inland Waters - Catchment scale influences - Influence of climate variability and change 

Australia is the driest inhabited continent on earth. Its interior has one of the lowest rainfalls in the world and about three-quarters of the land is arid or semi-arid. Rainfall trends are important from an environmental and an economic perspective. For thousands of years, Australia has experienced strong year-to-year variations in rainfall. These natural variations and any more extreme variations or changes in the normal scope of variation that may result from anthropogenic climate change are important indicators for the pressure of this change on inland waters.

Other indicators for this issue:

Biodiversity - Pressures on biodiversity - Climate variability 

Australia is the driest inhabited continent on earth. Its interior has one of the lowest rainfalls in the world and about three-quarters of the land is arid or semi-arid. Rainfall trends are important from an environmental and an economic perspective. For thousands of years, Australia has experienced strong year-to-year variations in rainfall. These natural variations and any more extreme variations or changes in the normal scope of variation that may result from anthropogenic climate change are important indicators for the pressure of this change on biodiversity.

Other indicators for this issue: