Indicator: IW-32 Frogs - Abundance and distribution

Data

Frogs listed under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999
Extinct
Rheobatrachus silus Gastric-brooding Frog
Rheobatrachus vitellinus Eungella Gastric-brooding Frog
Taudactylus acutirostris Sharp-snouted Day Frog, Sharp-snouted Torrent Frog
Taudactylus diurnus Southern Day Frog, Mt Glorious Torrent Frog
Endangered
Geocrinia alba White-bellied Frog, Creek Frog
Litoria castanea Yellow-spotted Tree Frog, Yellow-spotted Bell Frog
Litoria lorica Armoured Mistfrog
Litoria nannotis Waterfall Frog, Torrent Tree Frog
Litoria nyakalensis Mountain Mistfrog
Litoria rheocola Common Mistfrog
Litoria spenceri Spotted Tree Frog
Mixophyes fleayi Fleay's Frog
Mixophyes iteratus Southern Barred Frog, Giant Barred Frog
Nyctimystes dayi Lace-eyed Tree Frog, Australian Lacelid
Philoria frosti Baw Baw Frog
Pseudophryne corroboree Southern Corroboree Frog
Spicospina flammocaerulea Sunset Frog
Taudactylus eungellensis Eungella Day Frog, Mt Glorious Torrent Frog
Taudactylus rheophilus Tinkling Frog
Vulnerable
Geocrinia vitellina Orange-bellied Frog
Heleioporus australiacus Giant Burrowing Frog
Litoria aurea Green and Golden Bell Frog
Litoria littlejohni Littlejohn's Tree Frog, Heath Frog
Litoria olongburensis Wallum Sedge Frog
Litoria piperata Peppered Tree Frog
Litoria raniformis Southern Bell Frog, Growling Grass Frog, Warty Bell Frog, Green and Golden Frog
Litoria verreauxii alpina Alpine Tree Frog, Verreaux's Alpine Tree Frog
Mixophyes balbus Stuttering Frog, Southern Barred Frog (in Victoria)
Pseudophryne covacevichae Magnificent Brood Frog
Pseudophryne pengilleyi Northern Corroboree Frog
Taudactylus pleione Kroombit Tinker Frog, Pleione's Torrent Frog

Source: Department of the Environment and Heritage 2004, EPBC Act List of Threatened Fauna, viewed 31 Mar 2005, http://www.deh.gov.au/cgi-bin/sprat/public/publicthreatenedlist.pl?wanted=fauna

Countries with most amphibian species

Countries with most amphibian species

Source: Conservation International and NatureServe 2004, Global Amphibian Assessment, viewed 23 Nov 2005, http://www.globalamphibians.org/patterns.htm

Countries with Highest Number of Threatened Amphibians

Countries with Highest Number of Threatened Amphibians

Source: Conservation International and NatureServe 2004, Global Amphibian Assessment, viewed 23 Nov 2005, http://www.globalamphibians.org/patterns.htm

What the data mean

Frogs are declining on a world scale. In Australia there are about 220 species and 14 percent are threatened.

Data Limitations

Up to date, verifiable frog data are difficult to obtain.

Issues for which this is an indicator and why

Inland Waters - Response of biota - Frogs 

Declines in abundance and distribution are indicative of declines in the overall viability of a species.

Biodiversity - Species, habitats and ecological communities - Conservation status of species and ecological communities 

The abundance and distribution of frogs over time is an important indicator of the health of aquatic ecosystems as frogs are very sensitive to changes in their environment. Frogs are affected by habitat change, pollution, disease, predation and climate change. The global populations of frogs have been in decline for a number of years and this trend is also evident among Australian frog populations.

Other indicators for this issue:

Biodiversity - Species, habitats and ecological communities - Condition of freshwater biodiversity 

Frogs are very sensitive indicators of declining water condition as they are very sensitive to changes in their environment. Many species have suffered dramatic population declines since the 1980s, including disappearances from pristine habitats. Declines in abundance and distribution of frogs may be indicative broader declines in freshwater biodiversity.

Other indicators for this issue:

Further Information

WWF - Australia's declining frogs

Western Australian museum database