Species nominations not prioritised for assessment

The following species were nominated for assessment as threatened under the EPBC Act, but have not been prioritised for assessment. This is because at the time of nomination other species were considered to be of greater conservation concern and were considered to be a higher priority for listing assessment. The Minister accepted the Committee's advice and decided not to include the species on a Finalised Priority Assessment List for assessment for listing as threatened. A copy of the nomination and reasons that the species was not prioritised for assessment, are available below. Nominations are also available for data deficient species not prioritised for assessment for reasons of data deficiency.

Species name Years considered Reasons the Threatened Species Scientific Committee (the Committee) recommended that the nomination was not prioritised
Acizzia veski 2010, 2011 & 2014

Vesk's plant-louse (Acizzia veski ) is a small winged plant-louse (~3 mm) that feeds on plant sap and can provide a large part of the diet of many insectivorous birds and predatory invertebrates. The species is currently known from one location within the Stirling Range National Park of Western Australia. The species is known from the host plant Acacia veronica which is listed as a Priority 3 species under Western Australian legislation. This species has a very restricted distribution which is wholly protected within the Stirling Range National Park. The Committee recognises that its conservation may derive some benefit from listing under the EPBC Act. However, other species were considered to be of greater conservation concern and were considered to be a higher priority for listing. It is therefore not recommended for inclusion on the 2014 FPAL. The species is not automatically eligible for reconsideration for inclusion on the 2015 PPAL.

Nomination - Acizzia veski (Vesk's plant-louse) (PDF - 190.84 KB)  | (DOC - 219.5 KB)

Acizzia keithi 2010, 2011 & 2014

Keith's plant-louse (Acizzia keithi) is a small winged plant-louse (~3 mm) that feeds on plant sap and can provide a large part of the diet of many insectivorous birds and predatory invertebrates. The species is currently known only from one population of its host plant, Pultenaea glabra in the Blue Mountains, NSW. The host plant Pultenaea glabra is listed nationally as 'vulnerable' because of its disjunct distribution and vulnerability to threatening processes such as fire, habitat clearing and dieback. Given that the host plant already has the protection of listing under the EPBC Act, there may be limited conservation value in also listing A. keithi. Other species were considered to be of greater conservation concern and were considered to be a higher priority for listing. It is therefore not recommended for inclusion on the 2014 FPAL. The species is not automatically eligible for reconsideration for inclusion on the 2015 PPAL.

Nomination - Acizzia keithi (Keith's plant-louse) (PDF - 122.04 KB) | (DOC - 214 KB)

Bolemoreus hindwoodi = Lichenostomus hindwoodi 2013 & 2014

The Eungella honeyeater (Bolemoreus hindwoodi) is endemic to the Clarke Range, west of Mackay in Queensland; it occurs mainly in the Eungella National Park and the Crediton State Forest. The species was a publicly nominated for inclusion in the vulnerable category under the EPBC Act. The species is listed as Near Threatened under Queensland legislation. The nomination presents a case for population decline based on a series of formal and informal surveys carried out since 1980; the main threats are considered to be logging and mining exploration, and possibly habitat change from encroaching habitation. However, the severity of the declines and the scale and impacts from the threats were unclear. The nomination did not include data (on either the survey results, or the scale and impacts of the threats) that could be independently assessed by the Committee. The Committee therefore recommended excluding the species from the 2014 FPAL. However, the Committee suggested that the nominator should seek advice from a relevant expert and consider revising the nomination so that it better addressed the listing criteria. The nomination is not automatically eligible for consideration for inclusion on the 2015 PPAL.

Nomination - Bolemoreus hindwoodi (Eungella honeyeater) (PDF - 227.73 KB)  | (DOCX - 66.24 KB)

Canis lupus ssp. dingo (dingo) 2010 & 2011 & 2012

The dingo is found across Australia, in all states and territories except Tasmania. It has been affected by land clearing, agricultural practices, urbanisation, hybridisation with domestic dogs, lethal control, state and territory laws and, in the earlier part of the 20th century the erection of the Dingo Barrier Fence.

The Committee found that this species presents a complex range of issues, relating particularly to definition of species' bounds, cultural and ecological significance, interbreeding with wild dogs, and contested management and legislative requirements at regional, state and national levels. The Committee recommended the dingo not be prioritised, but that the merits of developing a wildlife conservation plan should be investigated.

Nomination - Canis lupus ssp. dingo (dingo) (PDF - 596.77 KB) | (DOC - 418.5 KB)

Cycas rumphii (a cycad)

2007 & 2008

There is likely to be a conservation benefit in assessing this nomination for listing and sufficient information to undertake an assessment.  However, there are insufficient resources at this time to give this nomination priority over those recommended for assessment because the species' ecological role is not as substantial and the level of threat acting on the species is not as high as other nominations.

The species will be covered under a regional recovery plan for Christmas Island which is currently being developed.

Nomination - Cycas rumphii (a cycad) (PDF - 247.26 KB) | (DOC - 120.5 KB)

Four large macropods: Macropus fuliginosus, Macropus giganteus, Macropus robustus robustus and M. erubescens, Macropus rufus

2012 & 2013

The Committee considered that the nomination was unlikely to succeed for any of the four species. The evidence provided did not appropriately address, and was not likely to meet, any criteria for listing. The nomination also failed to adequately address the status of the four species across the full national extent.

Manta alfredi (reef manta ray)

2012 & 2013

Overall and across all regions, there is a paucity of reliable information on relative decline, either historical or recent, of both species of manta (FAO panel for CITES, 2012).

The species is listed by the IUCN as vulnerable at a global scale. The rate of population reduction appears to be high in several regions, up to as much as 80% over the last three generations (approximately 75 years), and globally a decline of 30% is strongly suspected, however, populations are likely to be stable in locations where they receive significant protection, such as Australia (IUCN, 2011).

Nomination - Manta alfredi (reef manta ray) (PDF - 1 MB) | (DOCX - 154.38 KB)

Olax obcordata (sweetheart leaves)

2012 & 2013

The only extant populations are protected in a high conservation status reserve, and there are no clear causes of decline. Therefore, listing would have limited additional benefit at this time.

Nomination - Olax obcordata (sweetheart leaves) (PDF - 333.64 KB) | (DOC - 171.5 KB)

Pteropus conspicillatus 2013 & 2014 The spectacled flying-fox (Pteropus conspicillatus) was nominated for removal from the EPBC Act list of vulnerable species. Surveys to understand population dynamics are ongoing as part of the four-year National Flying Fox Monitoring Program, which commenced in 2012. These data provide some evidence of the species undergoing further decline over recent years. In light of this, and the fact that the monitoring program is ongoing, the Committee did not recommend the spectacled flying-fox for inclusion on the 2014 FPAL.

Nomination - Pteropus conspicillatus (spectacled flying-fox) (PDF - 181.03 KB) | (DOC - 149 KB)

Solanum bauerianum 2009, 2010 & 2014

This species is listed as extinct in NSW. The Committee is focussing on species where a conservation benefit may be obtained. The Committee may consider the species for assessment in the future if additional information becomes available.

Nomination - Solanum bauerianum (PDF - 109.45 KB)  | (DOC - 195.5 KB)

Stiphodon rutilaureus 2013 & 2014

The orange cling goby (Stiphodon rutilaureus) occurs in Australia, Northern Papua New Guinea, Solomon Islands, Vanuatu, Bismarck Archipelago and New Caledonia.  In Australia, the species is known from 12 creeks (a short 50-200m reach in each) along a narrow coastal strip in the central Wet Tropics from Russell Heads in to Emmagen Creek.  The species was publicly nominated for listing as Vulnerable under the EPBC Act. The Committee recognizes that the species has a fragmented and restricted distribution and that, while some populations are in National Parks, others are threatened by peri-urban development including water extraction and riparian zone clearing.  While the Committee recognises that the species would benefit from listing, other species are considered to be of greater conservation concern and the species was not recommended for inclusion on the 2014 FPAL other species are considered to be of greater conservation concern. The species will not be automatically eligible for reconsideration in 2015.

Nomination - Stiphodon rutilaureus (orange cling goby) (PDF - 305.96 KB) | (DOCX - 532.74 KB)

Stiphodon birdsong 2013 & 2014

The birdsong cling goby (Stiphodon birdsong) has been recorded from Papua, Papua New Guinea, Indonesia and the Australian Wet Tropics. In Australia, the known extent of occurrence spans a narrow coastal strip, at least from Oliver Creek near Cape Tribulation to the Malbon-Thompson Range.  The species was publicly nominated for listing as vulnerable under the EPBC Act.  The Committee recognizes that the species has a fragmented and restricted distribution and, while some populations occur in National Parks, would benefit from listing.  However, other species are considered to be of greater conservation concern and the birdsong cling goby was not recommended for inclusion on the 2014 PPAL. The species will not be automatically eligible for reconsideration in 2015.

Nomination - Stiphodon birdsong (birdsong cling goby) (PDF - 305.27 KB) | (DOCX - 508.2 KB)

Stiphodon atratus = Stiphodon sp. 1 2013 & 2014

The emerald cling goby (Stiphodon atratus) has been recorded from Indonesia, Northern New Guinea, Admiralty Islands, Halmahera Island, Bismarck Archipelago, Bouganville, Vanuatu and New Caledonia and the Australian Wet Tropics.  In Australia, the known extent of occurrence spans a narrow coastal strip, from Nyletta Creek in the south of the Wet tropics (Liverpool Creek catchment) to Camp Creek on Cape York.  The species was publicly nominated for listing as vulnerable under the EPBC Act.  The Committee recognizes that the species has a fragmented and restricted distribution and, while some populations occur in National Parks, would benefit from listing.  However, other species are considered to be of greater conservation concern and the Emerald Cling Goby was not recommended for inclusion on the 2014 PPAL. The species will not be automatically eligible for reconsideration in 2015.

Nomination - Stiphodon atratus (emerald cling goby) (PDF - 309.92 KB) | (DOCX - 543.95 KB)

Species – possible future consideration

The following nominations are either with the state/territory authority for consideration for state listing prior to being consider for national listing or have not been prioritised but are eligible for consideration in the next assessment cycle.

Species name Years considered Reasons the Threatened Species Scientific Committee (the Committee) recommended that the nomination was not prioritised
Aipysurus fuscus 2014 The dusky sea snake (Aipysurus fuscus) has a very restricted distribution in the Timor Sea. The species was publicly nominated for listing in the endangered category under the EPBC Act. The species now occurs only on Scott and Hiberian Reefs, which are separated by ~260 km of unsuitable habitat; and it is apparently threatened by hybridisation with Aipysurus laevis (Olive Seasnake) at both these locations. The species is extinct on Ashmore Reef. The estimated number of individuals is very low and there is evidence of a substantial population reduction in the last 10 years. The species is already afforded protection as a listed marine species under the EPBC Act and there is limited potential to mitigate threats. The species was not recommended for inclusion in the 2014 PPAL but is eligible for reconsideration in the 2015 PPAL.
Blechnum geniculatum 2009 & 2010

The nomination for this species is being assessed by New South Wales as part of the list alignment partnership with that state.

Callistemon purpurascens (a bottlebrush) 2012, 2013 & 2014

Callistemon purpurascens is a bottlebrush endemic to New South Wales that has very low numbers and a very restricted distribution. However, the description of the taxon has not yet been accepted for publication. This putative species, which is a public nomination,  is not recommended for inclusion on the 2014 PPAL. The taxon may be reconsidered for the 2015 PPAL if its taxonomic status is resolved.

Carcharhinus longimanus 2014 The oceanic whitetip shark (Carcharhinus longimanus) has a pantropcial and subtropical distribution. The species was publically nominated for listing as vulnerable under the EPBC Act. Within Australian waters, it is likely there are insufficient data to list this species under the EPBC Act despite widespread evidence of declines in other parts of its range, particularly the Atlantic Ocean. The species will be afforded some protection in Australian waters by being listed on Appendix II of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES), which becomes effective in September 2014. Further conservation and management of this species will require international agreement. The species was not recommended for incusing on the 2014 FPAL but is eligible for reconsideration in the 2015 PPAL.
Carmichaelia exsul 2009 & 2010

The nomination for this species is being assessed by New South Wales as part of the list alignment partnership with that state.

Coprosma inopinata 2009 & 2010

The nomination for this species is being assessed by New South Wales as part of the list alignment partnership with that state.

Coprosma sp. nov. 2009 & 2010

The nomination for this species is being assessed by New South Wales as part of the list alignment partnership with that state.

Crinia sloanei 2014 The Sloanes Froglet (Crinia sloanei) is a small ground-dwelling frog, restricted to the floodplains of the Murray Darling Basin in NSW, with a small number of records extending into northern Victoria along the Murray River and some of its tributaries. There is evidence that it is rare and in decline in relation to other frogs, particularly over the last 40 years. Remaining habitat largely occurs on small rural holdings and its survival is likely to be dependent on sympathetic management by private landholders. The Committee has been made aware that a review of all Australian frog species is intended to be undertaken in the next 12 months  and the Committee intends to await the outcome of this review prior to considering undertaking an assessment of this species. Itwas therefore not recommended for inclusion on the 2014 FPAL but is eligible for reconsideration in the 2015 PPAL.
Hibbertia sp.Turramurra (A. Robinson s.n. NSW981514) 2014 Julian's Hibbertia (Hibbertia sp.Turramurra (A. Robinson s.n. NSW981514)) is a small shrub only known from one population occurring in the Turramurra area (Sydney northern suburbs). This species is considered to be a new taxon by the National Herbarium of NSW and has not been previously considered for listing under the EPBC Act. There is likely to be a conservation benefit in assessing this species for listing. The Committee is aware that the NSW Scientific Committee is currently assessing the species' status, and will await the outcome of the assessment by NSW before considering whether to assess the species for listing under the EPBC Act. This specieswas not recommended for inclusion on the 2014 FPAL but is eligible for reconsideration in the 2015 PPAL.
Hydrophis donaldi 2014 Therough-scaled sea snake (Hydrophis donaldi) has been publicly nominated for listing in the vulnerable category under the EPBC Act. This newly discovered species appears to be rare but few data have been collected, a situation that will make meeting the EPBC listing criteria difficult. Collection localities are restricted to coastal regions of Weipa, Queensland. Data are not available to estimate population trends, total population size, or the number of mature individuals. Further survey work needs to be carried out before this species could be assessed as eligible for listing. This species was not recommended for inclusion on the 2014 PPAL. The taxon may be reconsidered for the 2015 PPAL if further information relevant to the listing criteria is made available.
Lasiorhinus latifrons 2014 The southern hairy-nosed wombat (Lasiorhinus latifrons) is an iconic species of significance to Indigenous Australians found in Western Australia, South Australia and New South Wales. The species was publicly nominated for listing in the vulnerable category under the EPBC Act. Its area of occupancy is fragmented and estimated to be less than 2000 km2 and the species is threatened by sarcoptic mange which can cause high levels of mortality in affected groups..Although there is sufficient information to undertake an assessment, this species is not recommended for inclusion on the 2014 FPAL because The Action Plan for Australian Mammals 2012 suggested that the species may meet criteria for listing as near threatened using IUCN criteria and priority has been given to other species. The nomination will be eligible for reconsideration for inclusion on the 2015 PPAL.
Lathamus discolor 2014 The swift parrot (Lathamus discolour) is currently listed as endangered under the EPBC Act, a listing supported by the The Action Plan for Australian Birds 2010.  The public nomination recommends its uplisting to critically endangered, based on new information (since 2010) on the threats to the species. Management plans for the species exist or are under development for its key habitats in Tasmania, and there is a National Recovery Plan for this species. Uplisting would not provide significantly greater protection under the EPBC Act. At this time, prioritisation of other species for listing will provide a greater conservation benefit so the species was not recommended for the 2014 PPAL. The species is eligible for reconsideration for the 2015 PPAL.
Macroderma gigas (ghost bat) 2013 & 2014

The cave-dwelling ghost bat (Macroderma gigas) is endemic to Australia, where it now occurs only in northern parts of Queensland, the Northern Territory and Western Australia. Some populations occur in protected areas. Its total area of occupancy is <2000 km2 and its geographic distribution is precarious to the survival of the species as a result of a range of threats, including land degradation, mining and competition with introduced predators. Despite prior listing as Vulnerable under the Endangered Species Protection Act 1992, the species was delisted in 2001 following assessment as ineligible under the EPBC Act. The species is believed to be declining in Queensland (where it is listed as Vulnerable) and possibly in the Northern Territory (listed as Near Threatened), although there are fewer data. There is little information on the status of Western Australian populations. The species was listed as Vulnerable in 2008 on the IUCN Red List, and The Action Plan for Australian Mammals 2012 assessed it as Vulnerable. There is likely to be a conservation benefit in assessing the species for EPBC listing, but given the species’ broad, cross-jurisdictional geographic distribution, and the likelihood that information may is incomplete for some parts of the range and assessment would be complex. Therefore, this species is not recommended for inclusion on the 2014 FPAL. As this is the second time the Committee has considered this public nomination, it will not be automatically considered for inclusion on the 2015 PPAL. However, the Committee has yet to consider the recommendation of The Action Plan for Australian Mammals 2012 and may considered including the species on a future PPAL is it is determined that an assessment is warranted.

Passiflora herbertiana subsp. insulae-howei 2009 & 2010

The nomination for this species is being assessed by New South Wales as part of the list alignment partnership with that state.

Sarcophilus harrisii 2014 The Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii) occurs only in Tasmania, where it is widespread across a range of land tenure types. It was listed as endangered under both the EPBC Act and Tasmanian legislation following substantial declines between 1996 and 2005 as a result of devil facial tumour disease (DFTD). A public nomination to delist the species was received in 2014. There is some evidence that the species' decline may have stabilised, and that the impacts of the disease may be less severe in some populations than others. However, DFTD has not yet spread to all parts of the devil's range and hence some level of ongoing decline is to be expected over the foreseeable future. Therefore, the Committee considers that the species is likely to still meet criteria for EPBC listing at this time. Accordingly, this species was not recommended for inclusion on the 2014 FPAL but is eligible for consideration for inclusion on the 2015 PPAL.
Solanum sulphureum 2014 Solanum sulphureum is a shrub restricted to the Taree district of New South Wales. There are currently low numbers of individuals and the species has a restricted and fragmented distribution. The species is threatened by agricultural management and competition from pasture grasses and invasive species. It is currently under consideration by the NSW Scientific Committee for listing in that state. The Committee recommends exclusion from the 2014 FPAL pending the outcome of the NSW assessment.  The species is eligible for reconsideration for inclusion on the 2015 PPAL.
Trachystoma petardi 2014 The Freshwater mullet or pinkeye mullet (Trachystoma petardi) is endemic to Australia, where it is found in a limited number of rivers and associated estuaries in Queensland and New South Wales.  The species has almost disappeared from the rivers at the northern end of their range, however, population decline is currently inferred and has not been yet based on any quantitative analysis. While the Committee recognizes that this species may meet criteria for listing, other species have been determined as higher priority and the Freshwater mullet was not recommended for inclusion on the 2014 FPAL but is eligible for consideration for  consideration for inclusion on the 2015 PPAL. 
Westralunio carteri (Carter's freshwater mussel) 2014

Carter’s Freshwater Mussel (Westralunio carteri) is endemic to Western Australia and was once found from Moore River in the north to King George Sound in the south and inland to the Avon River. The species has undergone a reduction (~50%) in range, largely as a consequence of salinization, and is now restricted to freshwater streams, rivers, reservoirs and lakes within 50-100 km of the coast, from Gingin Brook southward to the Kent River, Goodga River and Waychinicup River. The species was publicly nominated for listing as vulnerable under the EPBC Act. While the Committee recognizes that the species may meet at least some of the criteria for listing, there is not a diverse amount of information to support an assessment, and conclusions about its current conservation status may be difficult. Accordingly, Carter's Freshwater Mussel was not recommended for inclusion on the 2014 PPAL but is eligible for consideration for inclusion on the 2015 PPAL.