Exotic bird record–keeping scheme

The Australian Government has introduced a record–keeping scheme to help exotic bird owners keep adequate records. The Exotic Bird keepers Advisory Group (EBAG) played a major role in the consultation process to develop this scheme and in advising the department.

Classification of exotic birds

All exotic birds in Australia have been classified as either 'high interest' or 'low interest' based on their pest and disease risk and the potential for illegal trade. Read the 2007 Inventory of exotic (non-native) bird species known to be in Australia to find out the classification of your birds.

How to keep records

A guide to record–keeping for exotic birds provides details of how to keep records of your birds and return forms to the department. To keep records under this scheme you should:

  • use the Movement Transaction Record forms to record when you sell, loan or give birds as gifts
  • use the Activity Record forms to document events such as births and deaths and help you keep track of the specimens you hold.

Copies of record forms for high-interest birds should be returned to the department:

  • Activity records begin on 1 July each year and finish on 30 June the following year. Records should be sent to the department by 31 July each year.

Movement transaction records should be returned within 30 days of the transaction. The department encourages bird keepers to:

  • make a list of all the exotic birds they have
  • divide the list into Class 1, 2 or 3 species
  • compile all the documentation they have for each bird
  • individually identify high-interest (Class 1) birds
  • keep records for transactions involving Class 1 or 2 birds
  • send records for high-interest birds to the federal environment department.

Record–keeping forms

The forms for high-interest birds and low-interest birds are different. You cannot use record forms for low-interest birds to record movements and activities involving high-interest birds.

Forms for high-interest exotic birds

High-interest forms are only available in hard copy (book form) and can only be sent to you through the post. To order high-interest forms you can either email your address to exoticbirds@environment.gov.au or call 1800 720 466.

Forms for low-interest exotic birds

Movement transaction record form for low-interest species exotic birds

Use this form when you sell, loan or give birds as gifts-for low-interest species only (see the 2007 Inventory of exotic (non-native) bird species known to be in Australia to find out the classification of your birds.

Low-interest bird activity record form

Use this form to record information about your birds-for low-interest species only (see the 2007 Inventory of exotic (non-native) bird species known to be in Australia to find out the classification of your birds.

Marking and individual identification of exotic birds for record–keeping purposes

Bird keepers should individually mark and identify all of their high-interest birds. Permanent individual identification of exotic birds will:

  • allow exotic bird keepers to keep accurate records of the birds they hold and breed
  • help prove the source of exotic birds under national environment law
  • help prove ownership of a bird should it be stolen or escape
  • help to reduce illegal trade in exotic birds.

The method used to mark and identify each bird is a personal choice for bird exotic keepers. Bird keepers should use a system best suited to the species they keep and their individual situation; for example, bands, microchips, DNA samples etc. For more information on marking your birds read marking and individual identification of exotic birds for record–keeping purposes.

Free information package

The information pack includes:

More about exotic birds